Skip to main content

Full text of "Aggie life"

See other formats




?Sftfef»»5aa^P%'^" 



k^^ ; 


r. 1 

1 ;• '>A 





^^^^ 



--'m«, 



1#« 



^^:^f.^^^/^^^' K , 



^^' 



i.^^- 



^?!fF5 



'^'i 









''^ 




w 


1 


1 

a 




s« 








LIBRARY 



OF THE 




.if 

MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 

No.___ Date 

SOURCE 



J. p. CAMPION, 

•FASHIONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of AVoolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY . 

(^ All suits made in ray own work-shops. .^^1 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



A. B. CALL, 

273 riain St., 



Society « Catering: 



^=*BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON...^ 
GIVE us A CALL. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



(Dassaehosetts flgpieciltuFal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Perclieroii \m\ and Soytndom Slieep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



m/m 



{■ms^/% 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $S'00. 



^^REIRAlRiNO. 

New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and. Engagefnent Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RiaHT. 



GOLLESE 
JEWELER 



BENNETT 



COLLEGE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

;8®-EYES PITTED FREE.®a^ 
By a graduate of Dr. Fostee, Occulist. 




I have the ammunition to fit 
you -with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AQQIE LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 20, 1899. 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni ar« requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
te all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in advance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, . . . Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, . , . Y. H. Canto, Manager. 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, P. C. Brooks, Manager. 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon, Secretary. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi-tbrials. 



At the beginning of a new college year the "'Life " 
again greets its readers. Since the last issue many 
changes have been made in the board of editors but 
the general tone of the paper remains the same. 
Whatever changes shall be made in any of the 
departments shall be principally the results of changed 
conditions. In the past few years the " Life " has 
become an important factor in the college, and its 
aim shall be to continue along the lines which experi- 
ences have shown to be the most prolific of good 
results. 



All who have at heart the best interests of the col- 
lege should be pleased at the spirit which prevails at 
this time. The college has started upon another year 
carrying with her almost fifty new men to the goal of 
higher education. To better accomplish this end the 
cooperation of upper and lower classmen is necces- 
sary. Without this only partial success is possible. 
With cooperation a glorious field is opened up for the 



activities of the college. The present entering class 
is the largest which we have had for some time and 
is the forerunner of still larger classes. We have at 
last reached a position in the eyes of the people of 
Mass., where we can command their attention and 
consideration. The young men of our state and of 
neighboring states at last realize that there is hidden 
here a vast amount of knowledge awaiting only to be 
liberated and bestowed on him who desires it. 



At a Mass Meeting held in the Chapel a short time 
ago, a tax of three dollars was levied for the support 
of the football team. Immediately upon the breaking 
up of the meeting, the football manager collected 
over sixty dollars. This spirit should be fostered in 
every way possible and not only should managers of 
college teams endeavor to collect all taxes as soon as 
possible, but each man should feel it his duty to 
immediately discharge the debt which he contracts 
by signing a subscription paper. The advantages of 
the early payment of subscribed amounts by students 
are obvious. It not only gives the team manager ample 
time to devote to his work by relieving him of unnec- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



cessary labor, but it also inspires him with confidence 
which he cannot have without money in the treasury. 
The benefits coming to the individual from acquiring 
the habit of promptly meeting his obligations are also 
manifold. 



Once more we have a football team in the field 
that looks to us for support and encouragment. 
Whether this team shall be a success or failure 
depends in a great measure upon the numbers of the 
second eleven. If we are willing to subscribe and pay 
money for the support of this team, we should all 
make a more strenuous effort and come out at prac- 
tice. There is nothing so encouraging to a captain as 
to see a large team out for practice, and on the other 
hand, nothing is so discouraging as to see only a few 
men in uniforms. The management of our team has 
procured a competent coach and has done everything 
that can be done to insure a successful season. We 
have a schedule of games before us that has never 
been equaled. Rubbers have been engaged to aid 
the men in getting in good condition and every possi- 
ble encouragement is being given to players. Noth- 
ing more is necessary but good solid practice to bring 
new laurels to our college. 



The honor system in examinations was brought 
before the college last year quite strongly by the action 
of the class of ninty-nine. As there is at present no 
class in college who have adopted definite resolutions 
with regard to this matter, we wish to say a few words 
relative to the benefits which a class might derive by 
taking a stand against this form of dishonesty. The 
system of term examinations for all who have not 
attained a certain percentage in daily recitations is 
based upon sound principles and under certain condi- 
tions is productive of excellent results. But under 
other conditions this system may be subject to much 
abuse by the student. Were the ill effects of such 
abuse to stop with the man himself, the subject would 
not be worthy of so much consideration. But the 
man who by dishonesty gains in an examination a 
higher mark than his classmate who has studied hon- 
estly and conscientiously ,not only forfeits his own self- 
respect and that of all who know him, but he does the 
conscientious student an irreparable injury. The stu- 
dent who after earnest work finds, himself outclassed 



by a man who has come unfairly by his standing, is 
rarely stimulated by this to more study. On the con- 
trary he too will be tempted to become dishonest if he 
sees his classmates respecting the unfair man. But 
if a class show by their treatment of a man who acts 
unfairly that they do not sanction his doings, the man 
will soon learn that it is wiser for him to act fairly. 
The greatest enthusiasm and interest in study cannot 
be aroused in a class where men are acting unfairly 
and it is for the welfare of any class that they use the 
strongest measures to suppress this unfairness. 



A VINEYARD ADVENTURE. 

We were up in Mason's room one fine September 
evening, having a sort of business meeting. By " we " 
I mean the College Pomological Society, devoted to 
the collection and examination of desirable fruits and 
vegetables, and composed of a select half-dozen of 
enthusiastic investigators. It was our busy season 
just then, and meetings had been scheduled for pretty 
nearly every night. The one on this particular even- 
ing, however, was of special importance, since we had 
with us as a guest our former classmate and member, 
Billy Marshall, who had been obliged to leave the col- 
lege a couple of years before. 

As we were taking over old times together, and of 
course examining the new specimens that had been 
brought in, I happened to notice that Marshall, while 
bestowing much attention on some choice species of 
melon, was letting our grapes severely alone. This 
struck me as being very peculiar, as in the old days he 
had been our best connoisseur on the genus Vi'ti's. 

"Come, Bill," said I, "try a Delaware, they're 
pretty fair this year. Or say, there are some Niagaras 
that simply can't be beaten. Here, take a few." 

To my surprise he refused. 

"Sworn off. Never eat grapes- now," was all he 
would say. 

Naturally this reply provoked a laugh of derision. 

"Now, Billy, see here," we remonstrated, "do 
talk sense if it's just as easy. You might as well try 
to make us think that we'll pull a term mark of 100 
or anything else that's absurd, as to tell us that. 
We've seen you before." 

" Fact though. Got all I wanted last year." 

" That's likely. You used to be good for a peck 
anytime. You must have run up against — But if it's 



AGGIE LIFE. 



true there must be some sort of story attached ?" 

" Well, yes, there is, such as it is." 

" Then out with it. Anything that could give you a 
change of heart in that direction must be worth hear- 
ing. Come, we're waiting." 

So Marshall took another slice of melon and began. 

" You fellows all remember that last fall I went to 
work as a reporter in the little village of Plattsburg, 
just this side of the Adirondacks. It was rather a 
sleepy sort of place and it wasn't easy to settle down 
to steady work. Still, I made out to keep myself 
within bounds fairly well till one fatal night about the 
first of October. I had been restless and uneasy" all 
that day, fairly aching, in fact, to get into a scrape of 
some sort, and when, on my way home, I chanced to 
see a tempting basket of Concords displayed in a 
grocery window, my mind was made up. Cost what 
it might grapes I would have, and have that night. 
Buy a basket ? I laughed at the very idea. " Stolen 
fruit is much the sweetest ' and the sweetness was 
what I wanted." 

" Conscience didn't trouble you much, I take it?" 
queried Bailey. 

" Not a bit. Why should it ? Doesn't the Book 
of Leviticus expressly say, ' Thou shalt not glean thy 
vineyard, neither shalt thou gather every grape of thy 
vineyard ; thou shalt leave them for the poor and 
stranger.' All I was trying to do was to get my share 
of my rightful property. 

Well, about midnight, I left my room, groped my 
way down to the woodshed, where I had left a large 
peach-basket, and then crept stealthily out into the 
open air. It was broad moonlight, which enabled me 
to get my bearings easily, and I slipped off on a sort of 
dog-trot toward my destination. The cool night wind 
blew strong on my face and my spirits rose higher and 
higher as I ran along. I felt like my old self again, 
a college boy once more, ravaging familiar fields on 
just such a night as this. 

When I reached the place I reconnoitred a bit. It 
was a typical hill-farm, with the vineyard in the corner 
beside the house and the road. As I came near I 
could see the long rows of vines stretching up the 
hill ; and what was of more importance, I could see 
no sign of anyone watching. Evidently everyone was 
asleep and the ground was clear. Accordingly, I 
walked into the first row and soon had my basket 



filled. Thus far everything had gone well, and I was 
chuckling to myself over my proverbial good-luck when 
I heard a step behind me. I turned to see a man not 
ten feet from me. 

Naturally, I set off at my utmost speed down the 
row, and I doubt if the hundred-yard dash was ever 
run off in better time. I easily distanced my pur- 
suer, and breathed more freely, when just as I came 
out of the row I felt myself tackled from behind and 
fell heavily to the ground. Up again in a second, I 
sprang forward, and this time encountered a barbed- 
wire fence, which held me fast. Before I could free 
myself my pursuers came up and I found myself 
neatly trapped. 

Now this was a phase of the situation I had pre- 
viously tailed to consider, and I began to have some 
curiosity as to the termination of the affair. I sud- 
denly remembered that the owner had been variously 
described as an 'elderly gentleman with marked 
eccentricities,' ' the stingiest, meanest old skinflint in 
Plattsburg,' and ' the worst man for an enemy in 
Minor County.' In fact the more I considered the 
case, the less I liked it. 

My meditations' however, were rudely interrupted 
by one of my captors who instructed the other to 
bring me up to the house, ' and I'll carry the grapes,' 
he concluded. Resistance was evidently useless so I 
meekly followed to the kitchen. Here the farmer 
seated himself comfortably in one corner, and the 
other fellows a stalwart, stolid German, evidently the 
hired man, stood guard over the door. Then my 
ordeal began. 

' Well, young fellow, what have you to say for 
yourself ?' was the first remark. 

Hastily concocting a plausible answer, I replied that 
I had set out from the village early in the evening to 
buy a basket of grapes from him ; that I had lost my 
way and when I reached his house I had been unable 
to rouse him (which I devoutly wished had been the 
case), but not caring to go back empty-handed I had at 
last decided to pick a basket and settle with him the 
next time we met ; that he had come upon me unex- 
pectedly and so I had started to run involuntarily ; 
and finally that I would pay him for what grapes I 
had taken, then and there. 

The farmer looked at me intently for a moment then 
said. " Wall, suppose you do.' 



AGGIE LIFE. 



I put my hand to my pocket and just then remem- 
bered that I had left my money in my other suit. 

' I — I didn't — I forgot to bring any change with me,' 
I stammered, confusedly. 

' That's just what I thought, but never mind,' never 
mind. I don't begrudge a man a few grapes, not 
when he's had such a hard time to get 'em as you've 
had, at any rate. You shall have all you want without 
waiting another minute. Come, sit right down here. 
Fritz, you bring in his basket. And now, young fellow, 
just eat them grapes, and eat 'em all, and we'll call it 
square.' 

At first I thought he was joking, and I made no 
move to obey. 

' Come,- hurry up. No use in waiting. It's getting 
late and* you know you've got quite a job on your 
hands to eat them all.' 

' But I can't eat half a bushel of grapes at once, 
my stomach doesn't hold only three pints,' I objected. 
'0,1 guess you can if you try real hard. You see 
I want you to be sure and have enough.' 
' What if I don't eat them ?' 
' Go before the court to-morrow morning, cost you 
$10 or $15 and give you all the free advertising you 
want besides.' 

So that was the situation. Well, there was no 
help for it. I cast one glance at the farmer and saw 
no signs of relenting ; another at the doorway and saw 
the impassive Fritz blocking escape in that direction 
and still another at the rapidly increasing volume of 
the basket ; and then I began. 

The first four or five quarts were easy ; not for 
nothing had I been to college ; but after that they 
began to go hard. Anyone knows that grapes lose 
their good taste after a certain point is reached , and 
I had long since passed the limit. Yet 1 ate wearily 
on, though every grape cost an effort and every new 
bunch a sigh. I longed for a cup of gall and worm- 
wood, or poison hemlock, or even a drink of castor 
oil ; I thought of Tantalus, with dainties ever just 
beyond his reach and reflected how much more 
enviable was his lot ; or again 1 recalled stories of 
men who had drunk whole barrels of beer on a wager 
to die afterwards a horrible death. I considered the 
idea of accepting the alternative offered ; but the 
mere thought of the loss of position, reputation, but 
most of all of the esteem of a certain young lady 



of my acquaintance, was too much ; and I returned 
sadly to my interminable task. 

Once, indeed, I did stop for an instant ; but a sig- 
nificant gesture from the farmer warned me that no 
mercy could be looked for there. By this time too, 
my eating had become purely mechanical. Indeed, I 
could not have told whether I was eating grapes or 
sawdust. And in this condition, grape by grape, I 
finished the basket, how I do not know, and sank back 
in my chair completely exhausted. 

Not a word had been spoken since I began, though 
the eyes of both men had never left me for an instant. 
Now the farmer spoke again. 

' Wall, you see you did eat 'em after all. Now 
you better have some more.' 

I was too tired even to refuse. 

' No ? Why, that's funny. Thought you liked 
grapes. Wall, whenever you want some more just 
call around and I'll help you out. If there's anything 
I like it's to see a man get just what he likes, and 
enough of it to last.' 

How I got back to my room three miles away was 
something I never knew; but I do know that for the 
next week I was the sickest man you ever saw. And 
I never wanted another grape." 

" Well, I don't wonder," said I ; and the rest fully 
concurred. 



A WONDERFUL PHENOMENON. 

" Why don't you build a larger fire ? I had a hard 
time finding the place." 

" I was afraid the old codger that owns the pond 
would see it and think his ice house was on fire. It's 
mighty cold though, without a good blaze. While I 
was reconnoitering this afternoon I heard one man say 
to another that the ice on the pond is twenty inches 
thick and they are going to start cutting it to-morrow." 

" Then we are just in time ; when they start, the 
chances are there will be some one around about all 
the time This is a pretty good place for the purpose, 
eh?" 

" There's where I think you're off. I noticed this 
afternoon that the siding is banked mighty high on the 
outside of the curve. Although the bend is sharp I 
bet the train keeps to the track." 

"Well, supposing it does, it's not more than two 
hundred yards to the pond, and before the train stops 



AGGIE LIFE, 



it will be wrecked in it. Anyhow, between the tinie 
the accommodation and the express trains go by we 
haven't time to destroy or even obstruct the track. 
You saw that the switch worked ? " 

"Yes, I tried it and oiled it; so there's no worry 
about that. But what's worrying me is that if the 
train stays on the track it will not be wrecked, but 
merely stick in the mud at the bottom of the pond. 
You see, before the pond was dammed up higher the 
rails of the switch ran to its edge ; so now there's 
several hundred feet of track under water, and by the 
time the train breaks through all that ice to the end of 
the track — the engineer meanwhile putting on the 
emergency brakes — the train will be ready to stop." 

" Pshaw, you're full of notions. Wait ; time will 
tell the tale." 

A rumbling becomes rapidly distinct, a light 
approaches gliding swiftly over the rails. A straight 
stretch of several miles. The engineer opens wide 
the throttle. Before he has time to remove his hand 
the engine gives a violent lurch to one side. Cab and 
cars creak and strain, wheels rattle and scrape. Quick 
as a flash the engineer shuts the throttle and applies 
the air brakes. The train goes slower and slower, the 
pond approaches nearer and nearer. Here it is. The 
engineer and fireman hold their breaths and close 
their eyes. There is a jolt and a great booming 
sounds from all directions. A crunching sound con- 
tinues, then all is silence. Where is the wreck, where 
is the water ? The engineer and fireman open their 
eyes. 

In the next issue of the " Quebec Herald " appeared 
the startling headlines : " Wonderful Phenomenon. — 
Switch Left Open. — Train Rushes Down a Siding 
Towards the Ice Fields of Ihe Mittineague Ice Com- 
pany. — Now Rests Unharmed upon the Ice. 



THE ESSENTIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF A 
SCHOLAR. 

In every pursuit of life, whether requiring mental 
or physical application, there are some qualities that 
are necessary to success and without which there can 
be no great achievement. 

Industry is perhaps the most important of these 
qualities. We can point to no talented scholar, either 
in literature, science or the arts, and find a man of 
ordinary industry ; but all have acquired their learning 



only by faithful, persistant efforts ; these efforts are 
always the foundation of success. Shakespeare strug- 
gled on from year to year with untiring zeal, as we 
can readily see by the quantity, and the excellence of 
his works. Who can study his writings without 
noticing the toil, and the study in every department of 
nature that they required ? Who can think that his 
plays were written for recreation or for filling up his 
leisure hours ? It would be absurd to take this view, 
for we know such works could only have been written 
by a man possessing the ability and the capacity for 
indefatigable toil. The writings of Dickens, occupy- 
ing fifteen thousand octavo pages, require consid- 
erable time to be read, and when we consider the 
time spent in planning the works, in collecting the 
material and in forming the characters we are 
astonished at such persistent efforts. Sir Isaac New- 
ton studied month after month, on the mathematical 
and philosophical problems that now are important and 
accepted theories in our leading sciences, and he 
stated that all of his success was due to industry. 
Since such scholars as these, and hosts of others, 
have won laurels through their industry we must regard 
it as essential for the success of any scholar. 

A second characteristic is ambition. Whoever 
achieved success in any branch of knowledge, who 
was not ambitious ? The desire to be an accomplished 
scholar is a fitting one, and this oftentimes seems the 
only motive that induces persons to study. Many a 
young man before he has reached maturity has been 
deluded by the thought that some day he will make a 
second Webster or Lincoln. This thought spurs him 
to action and though he fails to reach his ideals, yet 
he accomplishes far more than he would otherwise 
have done. Suppose a man to have superior talent, 
a strong mind and a quick perception and all the qual- 
ities that go to make a thorough scholar, yet allows 
his powers to remain dormant. As a scholar he will 
not be above the average, but on the other hand, he 
who has ambition, and the same ab'lity, will cultivate 
his powers, and by his exertions he will far outshine 
the first. Caesar became so powerful a ruler by his 
ambition, and his quotation, made on passing through 
a small village " I had rather be first here than second 
in Rome," showed the strength of that trait. 

A third characteristic is natural ability; some persons 
undoubtedly have a natural tact for imbibing knowl- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



edge, lessons are to them easy to acquire. Yet this 
power is often abused, and the person who has it 
neglects to use it. Caesar appears to have been 
wonderfully endowed. We are told, he was able to 
read, write, hear and dictate at one time. We know 
that the mathematical scholar, with quick perceptive 
powers can accomplish little with the artist's brush, 
and if he lacks the taste he can never excel. So 
the successful student should study carefully the direc- 
tion of his natural abilities, for he can run more 
smoothly in those channels than in any other. 



Imprfssionj of a^n Idler. 



Oncejnore the Idler is back at his desk, thin, hol- 
low-eyed, careworn with all his summer duties. Once 
more he takes up his pen and his pipe, and falls back 
on that ease and carelessness, that has been his pil- 
low in years past. How good it seems to lay aside all 
those agreeable little manners, and those learned 
words and phrases, which used to dazzle the old folks 
at homd ; how easy it is to let care and worry slip on 
some other shoulders while he gazes about him and 
criticizes his fellows. He sees on all sides new faces, 
some happy and careless, others earnest and even 
careworn. He smiles at the earnestness, for he re- 
members how anxious he himself once was, as he 
started on an unknown path of life. In his heart he 
pities the fond, doting mothers who must miss the 
objects of their loving care. He even criticizes the 
judge of manhood who says, " This is a college man, 
this is not." 

There has crept into the heart of the Idler, a new 
spirit. It disturbs his mind sadly, it has crept in like 
a contagious disease from his fellow students. He 
feels ambitious, he wants to do right, he even wants to 
pay his honest debts. He looks about him and on all 
sides he sees men moved by the same impulse and 
doing the same things that he is so strongly moved to 
do. On Sunday morning he knows that he does not 
love to attend service but he goes expecting to be the 
only man ; but to his surprise the building is crowded 
with students and Faculty, and all seem to listen to 
the sermon. The change is inexplicable, but the 
Idler thinks that it has come to stay. 

To the Idler the friendly spirit manifested between 
the lower classes is a grand thing. There is no rea- 



son on earth, why gentlemen should not show a gen- 
tlemanly spirit toward each other, no matter what the 
conditions may be. Such gentleness as was shown 
on the campus a few days back is sure to produce 
friendly relations, and moreover, sooner or later, it 
will breed a good healthy college spirit in the hearts 
of both classes. However the matter should be car- 
ried no further. It should rather be stopped and each 
class should be taught to respect the other until one 
has proved itself the superior in everything. 

The old time war cry of the captain of our varsity 
foot ball team has arisen once more to the very sky. 
No one can explain why men will want to play the 
game and sit in their rooms while the team is bucking 
the wind on the campus. To be sure they have a 
good worthy opponent to fight, but wind never did and 
never will develop muscle, head, and all-round speed. 
The Idler is a lazy joy but it goes against his grain to 
hear men cry for opposition and have it refused. It 
is contrary to all the settled rules or the world, and 
makes men feel as though the world was wrong. 



^olle;^^ IMot^S- 



— The class of 1900 are Seniors now. 

Miss Ella Hall of North Amherst has been ap- 
pointed College librarian and entered upon her duties 
on August 1. 

— The Freshman class are learning rapidly these 
days under the instructions of Prof. Sophomore. 
The professor proves to be a pretty hard teacher. 

— Professor Howard, the successor of Professor 
Flint in the chemical department, has entered upon 
his duties. Professor Lull has returned from his 
western trip to the bad lands of Wyoming. 

— The officers for the Senior class are as follows : 
Pres't, F. H. Brown; vice pres't.Y. H. Canto ; sec'y 
and treas., E. T. Hull ; class captain, G. F. Parmen- 
ter; historian, M. B. Landers ; sergeant-at-arms, M. 
H. Munson. 

— The first social event of the year, the reception 
tendered to the members of the incoming class by 
the Y. M. C. A., was held on Friday evening Sept. 
15. The affair was largely attended and proved to 
be very successful. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The Junior class has elected the following offi- 
cers : Pres't, E. S. Gamwell ; vice pres't, E. L. 
Maconmber ; sec'y and treas., J. H. Chickering ; class 
captain, C. L. Rice ; historian, C. E, Gordon ; class 
physician, D. S. B. Greeley ; class undertaker, P. C. 
Brooks. 

— The Sophomore class has elected the following 
officers : Pres't, J. C. Hall; vice pres't, L. A. Cook; 
sec'y and treas., D. N. West ; class captain, J. H. 
Belden ; historian, H. L. Knight ; sergeant-at-arms, 
M. A. Blake; foot ball captain, W. Z. Chase ; rope- 
pull captain, H. L. Bodfish. 

The Freshman class has elected the following offi- 
cers: Pres't, E. L.Perkins; vice pres't, H. T. Kelly; 
sec'y and treas., G. D. Jones ; class captain, E. G. 
Proulx ; historian, N. F. Monahan; sergeant-at-arms, 
W. L. Hood; football captain, H. M. Cheever ; rope 
pull captain, C. A. Tinker. 

— The foot ball team is hard at work every day and 
under the directions of Captain Halligan and Coach 
Murphy promises to do unusually well. The mana- 
ger, C. L. Rice, has an excellent schedule for the 
season. The coach, Fred W. Murphy, was captain 
of the Brown team during the foot ball season of '98. 

— The reading-room association has appointed the 
following officers for the year : Pres't, A. C. Mona- 
han; sec'y and treas., C. E. Gordon; directors, M. 
B, Landers, J. H. Chickering and H. A. Paul. The 
reading-room has been reopened, the usual list of 
periodicals subscribed for and the telephone placed in 
its usual place. A few repairs are to be made and 
some new furnishings added. The room is open for 
the present from 7-30 a. m. to 9-00 p. m. 

— Dr. Goessmann, who is at present abroad in Ger- 
many with his wife and three daughters enjoying a 
years' leave of absence from, college and station duties, 
reports very favorably of German life. The Doctor 
has not been back to his native land for a number of 
years and it is his intention to make a study of Ger- 
man agricultural institutions and from time to time he 
he will communicate with Life his experiences. He 
hopes to visit all the prominent universities and exper- 
iment stations and thus get a thorough insight into the 
present scientific research of Germany. 

—In accordance with the old custom a mass-meet- 



ing was held on Friday evening, Sept. 8, the first Fri- 
day of the term. The advisory board. Prof. Mills and 
Dr. Page, was elected for the year. Prof. Smith 
was re-elected on the athletic board. The inter-fra- 
ternity agreement, as adopted by the four fraternities 
in May, was read and its significance explained to the 
Freshmen. A reading-room association was formed 
consisting of the entire student body. A board of 
directors was appointed. The foot ball situation was 
discussed and a tax to support the team was levied. 

— Nearly all the members of the three upper 
classes have returned to College this fall. The Sen- 
ior class has one addition, Ralph D. Gilbert of Gilead, 
Conn. E. B. Saunders, ex- 1900, who has been ab- 
sent a year on account of sickness contracted while 
serving in the army, has entered the Junior class. 
The Sophomore class has lost three men. E. S. Ful- 
ton has entered Mass. Institute of Technology; H. C. 
Hanlon has entered Tufts college ; T. M. Carpenter of 
Foxboro has become a member of the class and also 
H. A. Paul, ex-'Ol, who served a year under Colonel 
Pew in the 8th Massachusetts Volunteers, U. S. A. 
The total number of students in the College at the 
present time is 125. 

— The names and home addresses of the members 
of the entering class are as follows : 

Lilly Bertha Allen, Amherst 

Stephen C. Bacon, Leominster 

George L. Barrus, Goshen 

Ernest E. Blake, Turners Falls 

Howard C. Bowen, Rutland 

Patrick H. Bowler, ' Bondsville 

Charles L. Bowley, Milton 
Philip W. Brooks, Point Shirley [Winthrop] 

Edward S. Carrington, Monterey 

John T. Caruthers, Columbia, Tenn. 

Herbert M. Cheever, West Boylston 

Joseph G. Cook, Clayton 

James H, Dillon, Belchertown 

Harry J. Franklin, Bernardston 

Frank A. Goodwin, Ashfield 

Frederick A. Harris, Amherst 

Willis E. Higgins, Maynard 

William L. Hood, Vandiver, Ala. 

Gerald D. Jones, South Framingham 

Herbert T. Kelley, Amherst 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Charles P. King, 
Clarence W. Lewis, 
Henry T. Martin, 
Neil F. Monahan, 
Paul N. Nersessian, 
George E. O'Hearn. 
Albert Parsons, 
Josiah W. Parsons, 
William W. Peebles, 
Edward L. Perkins, 
Arthur A. Phelps, 
Lee Phillips, 
Elmer M. Poole, 
Roland D. Potter, 
Edward G, Proulx, 
Harlan Is. Richardson, 
Richard N. Robertson, 
Edward B. Snell, 
Leslie I. Thompson, 
Clifford A. Tinker, 
William E. Tottingham, 
Winthrop V. Tower. 
Phillip G. Vance, 
Frank W. Webster, 
Myron H. West, 
George A. Witherell, 
Ernest Wollheim, 
Wilbur F. Wyman, 



Sutton 

Melrose Highlands 

Amherst 

South Framingham 

Bitlis, Turkey 

Pittsfield 

North Amherst 

Northampton 

Washington, D. C. 

Roxbury 

Marlboro 

West Hanover 

North Dartmouth 

Rutland 

Hatfield 

Boxboro 

Maiden 

Lawrence 

Middleboro 

West Tremont, Me, 

Bernardston 

Melrose Highlands 

Stow 

Bay State 

Belchertown 

Warwick 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Hyde Park 



LIBRARY RULES. 



The library and reading room shall be open during 
term time (holidays excepted) from 8.00 a. m. to 5.00 
p. M. and from 6.30 to 8.00 p. m. On the Sabbath 
from 10.30 a. m. to 1.30 p. m. 

Access to the shelves is freely granted under the 
oversight and direction of the librarian in charge from 
8.00 A. M. to 5.00 p. M. 

Members of the college, officers, students and resi- 
dents shall be entitled to the use of the library. Also 
such other persons as may receive permission from 
the Librarian. 

No person except officers of instruction and resi- 
dent graduates shall retain from the library more than 
three volumes at a time or a book, without renewal 
longer than two weeks, except by special permission. 



No officer of instruction shall retain from the 
library more than fifty volumes at one time. 

Books placed in the Reading Room for reference 
cannot be drawn. 

A person taking, without permission, a book put in 
the Reading Room for reference shall be fined. 

Except by special permission, no book shall be 
renewed unless brought to the library. 

Officers of instruction and students shall return or 
renew all books during the week ending with the last 
Thursday of each term. 

A fine of two cents a day shall be imposed if a book 
is kept over time : if not returned after one month's 
notice the book will be considered lost and the bor- 
rower shall be charged its value. 



AGREEMENT OF THE COLLEGE FRA- 
TERNITIES. 

1. A Fraternity conference consisting of two 
undergraduate and one graduate member from each 
fraternity was organized during the fall term of 1898. 

2. " The object of the conference is to further 
the best interests of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, to secure closer union between the fraterni- 
ties, and to make possible the more united action by 
them in matters of common interest," (taken from 
by-laws). 

3. It was voted by the conference Dec. 15, 1898 : 

a. No pledges of new men shall be taken by 
members of college fraternities before the opening 
day of the winter term. 

b. Men entering after Dec. 1, shall not be pledged 
for a month after entrance. 

c. Any pledge taken in violation of these rules 
shall be considered void. 

d. These agreements shall be presented to the 
freshman class within three days after the opening of 
the fall term, by the president of the senior class. 

e. They shall also be published in the first issue of 
Aggie Life for the fall term, and in the Y. M. C. A. 
handbook. 

All these agreements have been formally ratified 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and ratification reported to the conference by each 
fraternity. 

4, Plans are under consideration by the confer- 
ence to bring all the fraternities together for a social 
intercourse and a general good time, occasionally 
during the present college year. 

F. S. CooLEY, Chairman. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE MAS- 
SACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE ATHLETIC BOARD. 

The following was published in the Life, Nov. 4, 
1896 and is republished for the benefit of those who 
have entered college since that time : 

SECTION I. 

Article 1. The Board shall have control of the 
athletic interests of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College and of any funds or income of any funds that 
may be intrusted to them for athletic purposes. 

Article 2. The Board shall have the power to raise 
and collect subscriptions and in other ways to increase 
the athletic funds of the college. 

Article 3. The Board shall have advisory power 
in questions of intercollegiate athletic policy. 

Article 4. The Board shall appoint a resident sec- 
retary and treasurer who shall receive and deposit all 
moneys for athletic purposes, whether gate receipts, 
subscriptions, guarantees, or proceeds from benefit 
entertainments. 

Article 5. All contracts relating to athletic objects 
shall be made by the treasurer or by any authorized 
agent in the name of and with the approval of the 
board. 

SECTION II. 

Article 1 . The Board shall be composed of nine 
members, viz., the chief officer respectively of the 
base-ball, foot-ball and athletic clubs, the latter shall 
include all field sports except base-ball and foot-ball ; 
three members of the faculty, and three of the 
alumni of the college, one of whom shall be a resi- 
dent alumnus who shall also be secretary and treasurer 
of the board. 

Article 2. The chief officer of each of the above 
named associations shall become a member of the 
board by virtue of his office and his membership shall 



cease upon the expiration of his term of office. 

Article 3. The President of the College, at the 
commencement of the fall term of each year, shall 
appoint three members of the board from the faculty. 
The President shall have power to fill vacancies 
occurring among the faculty members of the board. 

Article 4. The three alumni members shall be 
elected as follows : 

One by the student body at a mass meeting at the 
commencement of the fall term of each year. 

One by the faculty at their first meeting after the 
commencement of the fall term. 

One by the associate alumni at their commence- 
ment meeting. 

Article 5. The term of office of members of the 
board shall be one year or until their successors are 
chosen. 

SECTION III. 

The board shall have power to fill all vacancies 
occurring in the board not already provided for in 
Article 3, Section II. Members thus appointed shall 
hold office for the unexpired term of their predecessors. 

SECTION IV. 

Article 1. The board shall have the power to 
frame its by-laws governing time, place and conduct 
of meetings and its procedure in matters brought it 
for action. 

Article 2. As soon as possible after the com- 
mencement of the fall term, the board shall be called 
together by the senior faculty member for the purpose 
of organizing and electing a secretary and treasurer 
from the alumni members of the board. 

Article 3. Amendments may be made to this con- 
stitution when proposed by two thirds of the board 
members and ratifed at a college mass meeting. 

BY-LAWS. 

SECTION I. 

The officers of the board shall be a President, Vice- 
President, a Secretary and Treasurer, and an execu- 
tive committee consisting of five members, viz., a 
faculty member of the board, the secretary and treas- 
urer of the board, and the undergraduate members of 
the board. 



lO 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SECTION n. 

The election of officers shall be by ballot at the 
first meeting of the board after the commencement 
of the fall term. 

Article 2. The officers shall hold terms for one 
year. 

SECTION in. 

At the first meeting of the board after the com- 
mencement of the fall term an auditor shall be elected 
who shall be a member of the board but hold no other 
office in the board, and who shall once in a year audit 
the accounts of the treasurer and report to the board. 

SECTION IV. 

Artfcle 1. The duties of the President shall be to 
call and preside at all meetings of the board. 

Article 2. The duties of the Vice-President shall 
be to perform the duties of the President in his absence 
or disability. 

Article 3. The duties of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer shall be to issue by letter the call for all meetings 
of the board at least seven days before the hour of 
meeting. He shall keep an accurate record of all the 
votes and other doings of the board, in a book pro- 
vided for the purpose, in which shall also be written 
the constitution and by-laws of the board. He shall 
record the place, time, score and expense of all 
official games and contests. He shall notify the chair- 
man of each committee chosen by the board of his 
appointment and each individual of any duty assigned 
him by the board. 

He shall also receive and account for all the money 
of the board in whatever way placed in his hands. 
He shall pay out money for all general purposes only 
on the written order of the executive committee. 
He shall pay out money for the expenses of the single 
associations only upon the written order of the mana- 
ger of that association, some other member of the 
executive committee and the treasurer. All of his 
accounts shall be kept in a book prepared for the pur- 
pose, which shall be open for inspection at any time 
to the members of the board. 

Article 4. The duties of the executive committee 
shall be to act upon all questions which shall require 
attention between the meetings of the board. They 
shall submit all such actions for approval to the board 



at its next meeting. In all questions of general interest 
the entire committee shall act, the undergraduate 
members, however, having but one vote. On ques- 
tions concerning the affairs of any single association, 
the committee shall consist of the faculty member, 
the treasurer of the board and the manager of the 
association concerned. 

SECTION V. 

The board shall hold one regular meeting each year 
as provided by the constitution. A special meeting 
may be called at any time by the President and two 
other members provided one week's notice in writing 
be given to each of the members, 

SECTION V!. 

Five members of the board shall constitute a 
quorum for transaction of business provided there be 
at least one representative from the faculty, alumni 
and undergraduates. 

SECTION VII. 

These by-laws may be added to, altered, amended 
or repealed by a two-thirds vote of the members pres- 
ent at any regular meeting, or special meeting called 
for that purpose, provided that the addition, alteration, 
amendment or repeal is left with with the secretary 
and notice thereof given to each member one week at 
least before said meeting. 

SECTION VIII. 

No person shall be a member of any team who is 
not an accredited member of the college as deter- 
mined by the books of the registrar. 

SECTION IX, 

Article 1. No manager or other official shall con- 
tract debts to a greater extent than ten dollars ($ 1 0) 
without the approval of at least three other members 
of the executive committee. 

Article 2. No manager or other official shall incur 
any expense after all the money subscribed has been 
expended until he has collected and placed in the hands 
of the treasurer new funds sufficient to cover 
expenses. 

SECTION X. 

Each manager shall make his returns to the treas- 
urer within three days after a home event or on his re- 
turn from a trip. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SECTION XI. 

The executive committee shall have the control of 
the field and its appurtenances between meetings of 
the board. They may also appoint a director to have 
immediate charge of the field. 



E:)ScKain^es. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

This Country of Ours by Ex-President Benjamin 
Harrison. This book is intended to give an idea of 
the inside workings of our national government and of 
the relation and uses of the several parts. The author 
certainly is one who has had ample opportunity to 
observe the governmental machinary in motion and 
the story savors of his own experiences. 

Labratory Work in Bacteriology by Prof, Frederick 
G. Novy, M. D., of Univ. of Mich. The subject of 
bacteriology is one that must be thoroughly mastered 
by medical and veterinary students of the present day. 
The laboratory work is the most important feature of 
this study. It is as a beginner's laboratory guide that 
this book is especially useful although there is also 
much of value to advanced students to be found in the 
latter part of the work. 

A Text Book of Plant Diseases by George Massee , 
F. L. S. This book is of great practical value to 
those directly occupied in the cultivation of plants. 
It enables one to determine the nature of diseases 
caused by cryptogamic parasites and gives directions 
for the use of the best preventives or curatives in 
each case. The authorities upon which the work is 
based are the results of investigation in the leading 
Experiment Stations in United States and England. 
It is especially commendable for its convenient form 
as a reference book. 

The Dawn of Reason by Dr. James Weir, This 
little volume which is based upon the personal obser- 
vation of the author contains much reliable data con- 
cerning the mental traits of the lower animals. The 
book proves quite conclusively that the lower animals 
possess one or all of the five senses — sight, smell, 
taste, hearing and touch, that they evince conscious 
determination, that they possess the faculty of memory, 
that the emotions are quite highly developed in most 
cases, that they give evidence of aestheticism, paren- 
tal affection and even reason. The book is not lack- 
ing in interesting incidents and shows the result of 
careful observation. 



The problem of the exchange column of a college 
paper in many instances yet remains to be solved. 
Proper heed must be paid to the office of the depart- 
ment. It is more or less incongruous with the head- 
ing of the exchange column when simply a list of 
papers is mentioned, or when the column is filled up 
with quibbles. It is not what is expected. What 
interest can you, my reader, have in the mere 
acknowledgement of the receipt of your paper by the 
exchange editor of some other college journal ? 
None, I venture to say ; but if some criticism appeared, 
your interest would be at once awakened ; you would 
feel that the paper had at least been opened instead 
of being laid away till kindling time should arrive. 
And what is more, those papers which did not receive 
mention would feel that a paper which devoted its col- 
umn to criticism would be more apt to have scanned 
their columns than would a paper which used the 
space in the exchange column for other purposes. 
They would appreciate the fact that the exchange list 
is too large for every paper to receive criticism, and 
that some selection must be made. 

The exchange and interchange of friendly criticism 
is what is needed. In this way we may hope to have 
our notice drawn to articles we may have overlooked ; 
to have the merits of an especially good composition 
pointed out to us, or better yet to afford an opportunity 
for expression of opinion on points of excellence in a 
composition ; in short, to have carried out in the col- 
lege paper world the highest good that an exchange 
department can accomplish. 

It follows from the similarity of conditions among 
all student bodies that the representative papers of^ 
any college may contain much that is valuable for 
another, especially in the editorials. Some time and 
thought must be put on editorials. The space devoted 
to them should be ample, and should not be sacrificed 
to matters manifestly of less importance. 



Alu 



mm. 



71. — William Wheeler, Civil Engineer, 14 Beacon 
St., Boston. 

71. — L. A. Nichols, Engineer of the Nichols' 
Engineering and Contracting Co., 1538 Monadnock 
Bl'd'g, Chicago. 

'73. — Chas. M. Cooke is President of the Bank of 
Honolulu. Address, Honolulu, H. I. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



74.— John A. Hobbs, Proprietor of the Rocky Mt. 
Dairy. His present address is 13 E. 3d South St., 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 

76._Chas. H. Phelps, Real estate agent. 32 
Broadway, New York city. 

Ex-79.— Elisha H. Hunt died July 25 at Park 
Ridge, 111. from the effects of pneumonia united with 
phthisis. 

'85. — Isaac Newton Taylor is Adjuster of the San 
Francisco Gas and Electric Co. His present address 
is 815 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

'87. — Henry N. W. Rideout, Ass't paymaster in 
the office of the Fitchburg R. R. 

'91. — Certain readers of the Life will be glad to 
learn that a daughter, Margaret, was born to E. P. 
Felt on'june 27, 1899. 

Ex-'92. — Harlan F. Stone and Agnes Ella Harvey 
were married Sept. 7 at Chesterfield, N. H. They 
Will reside at 912 West End Ave., New York city. 

'92. — Homer Cady West, who has for some time 
been with the Waltham Manufacturing Co., Waltham, 
Mass., was lately appointed superintendent of that 
company. 

'94. — Claude Walker is teaching chemistry in the 
High School at Calumet, Mich. 

'94. — Linus Hersey Bacon and Miss Edith Florence 
Howland were married June 28th at Spencer. The 
conple will make their home at 36 Cherry St., Spencer. 

'94. — T. S. Bacon, Practicing Physician, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

'95. — Thos. P. Foley. Word has been received 
that Mr. Foley has been appointed instructor of Math- 
ematics and Physics in St. Austin's School, the posi- 
tion previously filled by A. J. Morse '94. Address 
West New Brighton, New York. 

'95. — Fred Andrew Smith and Frances Mary Kirk- 
land were married Monday, July 10. They will make 
their home in Lynn where Mr. Smith will continue 
his business of market gardening. 

'96.— Married at Petersham, July 13, 1899, Allen 
Bradford Cook and Emma Louise Shepardson. 
Address, Pine Orchard, Ct. 

'96. — Married at Tokyo, Mr. Seijiro Saito and Miss 
Ren Sato, June 3, 1899. 

'99. — Fred A. Merrill was in town a few days last 
week. He is at present private secretary to Mr. M. 
R. Knowlton. 278 W. 70th St., New York. 



''THERE'S A BIG DIFFERENCE" is the title of a 
unique little catalog issued by the Walker Publish- 
ing Co. of Chicago, showing their bargain prices on 
miscellaneous standard books, sheet music, etc. It is 
a handy little reference to have on one's desk espec- 
ially if purchases are to be made. It is sent free for 
the asking. Students who like extra pocket money or 
assistance towards expense paying would do well to 
read the advertisement of this Company in another 
part of this paper, and correspond with them at once. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN, 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St., 
NORTHAMPTON. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand' 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



i>]<iMta$, 

AMHa$-r, Aa$$. 



TEACHERS WANTED 



UNION mim DIEPIES OF miw- 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



PittBburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York, •Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver.' There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. UncLualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHlflGTOH, D. G., OP PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. 1:^. BKOWN, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Etlier and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



James E. Stintson, Manager, 

CLOTHIERS and FURNISHERS. 

ALL THE NEW THINGS IN 

NECKWEAR, HATS AND CAPS, 

GOLF SUITS, &c. 

Cook's Block, ----.- Amherst, Mass. 

OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

EEAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



/^GGlE LIFK. 



Staf t in Basiness for Yoafself . 



SUCGUSS ASSURED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructious and outfit, "We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 



ica. 



DARFAGH & RICH, 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. Tt^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
BEIILER IN STOVES BND Mim. 

AGENT FOR THE CELEBKATEB 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



^^. R. Ell lDER, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Eememher these suits sire pressed not sponged or hurned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Lo'velly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. 0. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




THeLeaiiiiigPliotograplie 



rapner 

OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS. 
'Work Guaranteed or money refunded. Give us a trial. 



102 Main St., opp. Court House, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



MAKUFACTUBER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RiVEH Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. 3. HICKINSDN, B. IS. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours: 

9 TO IS -A.. Iwl., 1-30 TO 5 I>. l^Ai. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered wlien desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBEIS C3-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Jl^Itepairing done while you wait, Sit 

2 FsoEifix now. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AUITT aTXHUT, AMMUJRST, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 



FINE REAOMADE SUITS. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



Ti 



S 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
■west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-OperatiYe Steam Lanndry* 

and Carpet Renovating Estaisliment, 



A.8:s:ie> wA-geixt, 



H. 3Cv. C£«A.JVE5 »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

ff'^sS A-TISFA-OTIOISr G»-XTA.RA.3SrTEBr>, (MS* 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE, 



PaitriHge's mietic Qutflttiis.^ 



Base Ball, Toot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NE]N STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, - 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. KELTON. 



F. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POOLTBY, VEGETHBLES, FISH UdD OYSTEHS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPH/G STUD/O. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



108 Main Stbeet, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 




Consider— If yon can keep tlie wet ont 
1^ of your rifle it vrill not rustnoifreeze. Only 

I Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, shedding -water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-paae book (just out) 
tells aU about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about powder8,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketed^ soft-nosed, mushroom,') etc.: 
trajectories, Telocities,penetrations. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
1,000 other things, including many trade 
, . secrets never before given to the public. 
'^\Free if i/ou mil send Stamps for postage to 
^^'- The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



^ 



HEADQUA RTERS FOR AB6!E STUDENTS. 

HAIR BRESSIMa ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, barbers' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

C. R. KENFIELD, 

:e=23:otoo-:k-^:fi3:eib. 



Portrait and Group WorTc a Specialty. 
Prices always tlie lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, $2.00 and $2.50 im- doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 2Jer doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
Studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A.MSEMST, MJLSS. 



Hmberst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENORICK, Manager. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STOBE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
STJITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, "Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices, 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amhekst, Mass. 



J. A. RAWSON, 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWEIiRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

' Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMRTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OE 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR EURNACE HEATING, 

ALS O 

STEAM AND HOT "WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



. . fllHEt^ICflH . . 
Pl^IJlTlKG m E|GTO1G COflPlIJlY. 

RINTINQ 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 




Speelal Httentlon given to Hl9h"elass illastfated 
Book and ]«[agazlne ^oi<k. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 
SERVICE PROMPT. 

TELEPHONE, BOSTON 860. 



50 met) Street, Boston, mass. 



MASS.JIGRICDLTUP COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We ■would inform the friends of the college, and the puhllo 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 
PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



^TA I LP R> 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



* l '^ — :the:: — =^ t *- 

flba66acbu6ett6 

HGticultura 



OFFEIRS 



1. A SHOl&T WINTESl GOUH.SE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A rOUS, YEARS' COUE.SE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, , 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply, to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



CCrvL_A^, 



■MiASS. 

Oct. 4, 1899 



^<r-a!j<j»^ 




y! A..t^^ 








VLL. X. 



NO. 2. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH IN OS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



A. B. CALL, 

273 riain St., 



I^BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON.:.^ 
GIVE US A CALL. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoflfman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S APER8T HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, %2.^o to $5.00. 



REIRAIRINO. 



New Soles and Heels, 75e. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICEIS RIOHT. 



GOLLEE m 
JEWELER Dl 



JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

4®-BYES FITTED FREE.=ffi8r 
By a graduate of Dr. Fostee, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




^^^j;;;;^^ 



COHjL-A-I^S 



UNDEK THE HOTEL. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 4, 1899, 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications stiould be addressed. Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ofi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'to rials. 



The new plank walk to the boarding-house satisfies 
a long felt want. A few electric lights along its 
course would also be appreciated. 



We are pleased to note that the debts of the old 
reading room have all been paid off and the new read- 
ing room now stands upon a business basis. We 
think that this paying off of old debts and reorganizing 
old college organizations is a sign of the better times 
upon which we have entered. If the spirit which is 
manifested by the actions of mo,st of the students 
while in the reading room can be carried into other 
departments of college life, we can gain much there- 
from. 



A QUESTION which presents itself to us for consider- 
ation at this time is, what preparation can be made 
for the indoor training of our track athletes, during 
the coming winter ! Our experience of last spring 
has clearly demonstrated our ability in this branch of 



athletics. If however we are to continue our advance- 
ment along these lines we must have our men pre- 
pared for spring training by occasional indoor meets 
during the winter. In order to properly carry on these 
meets a few things are necessary. First we must 
have something in the way of equipment in our gym- 
nasium. A large amount of apparatus is not neces- 
sary but some things are positively needed. Next the 
Drill Hail must be kept sufficiently warm so as not to 
endanger the health of those exercising in light cloth- 
ing. Whether the money needed for apparatus can 
be obtained by subscription or otherwise if anything is 
to be done, it should be done soon. 



The exact position which the Life holds in college 
is perhaps unappreciated by many. In larger colleges 
a newspaper and also a literary magazine are pub- 
lished, but in our own case this is not possible and 
our paper must perform both of these functions. To 
succeed best in both of these capacities the Life 
needs the aid of all those who can write. The contri- 
butions which have been received this year seem to 



M 



AGGIE LIFE. 



indicate a lack of interest. To awaken this interest 
and arouse competition in writing the Life proposes to 
make the following offer : To the author of the best 
story of not less than fifteen hundred words will be 
presented a set of the works of some standard writer. 
All stories must be handed in before Oct. 14. All 
articles handed in shall be carefully examined and the 
prize will be awarded upon the basis of originality and 
literary excellence. These articles will also be taken 
into consideration in electing new members to the 
board. 



Those who have looked closely into the condition 
of affairs, find that we are absolutely lacking in social 
life here at, College. Occupied as we are with study, 
we are ap* to forget that we possess a social side to 
our natures which needs attention perhaps more than 
the physical or intellectual side. Several plans have 
been considered for awakening this dormant feeling 
of socialness but as yet no direct move has been 
made in that direction. One of the ideas which has 
been proposed is the holding of a social gathering in 
the Drill Hall or Chapel during the winter. A meet- 
ing of this kind would draw the students closer to- 
gether and enthuse men with a better feeling toward 
their college and toward each other. A sleighride 
party to Northampton or some neighboring place has 
been suggested. If any of these plans are to be car- 
ried out they must be unanimously supported or they 
will be more harmful than otherwise. If they are 
well supported they will be production of much good. 



Again we have a Glee Club and watch its progress 
with an interest born of previous disappointments. It 
has become common with us to see the Glee Club 
organized and making excellent progress only to have 
it fade away and gradually go out of existence, when 
it should be ready to furnish its share of entertain- 
ment for the College. There is ever present the 
need of a well organized Glee Club and the good it 
could accomplish would be great. It would bring out 
in men the best talent which now slumbers unused. 
It would develop others who think they have no talent 
but who moved to effort by the force of example 
would be surprised at their own efficiency. Music 
brightens all our lives without exception. The influ- 
ence of a song upon the singer is well known. It 



cheers the inward man even though there is no appeal 
to the ear. Mutual good must result from a Glee 
Club if it be managed aright. Informal rehearsals 
given in the Chapel would do much to arouse the 
interest of the college and ensure financial support. 



A TALE OF A HAT. 

•' Say, Tilden, what's the matter with Kendall 
lately? " asked Ned Powers the other night as I sat 
down to supper. 

" Why, what seems to be ? I haven't noticed any- 
thing special. Guess he's all right." 

" Yes, but he's so quiet. Kind of subdued, you 
know. He used to be rather combative and had an 
idea he was as infallible as the Pope. Now to-night 
we were talking and he admitted that he ' might pos- 
sibly be mistaken.' A week ago you couldn't have 
convinced him of that in a month." 

" Oh, that's what you mean, is it? Well, I don't 
wonder he's somewhat changed. He had a little 
experience the other night — but I thought you men 
knew all about it ? " 

" Knew about it? No, you never said anything." 

" Perhaps I didn't. Oh, I guess he made me 
promise to keep still ; but it's a little too good for that. 
You remember, Kendall and I went down to that 
church reception the other night. Had a fine time 
too ; saw that girl who was here Commencement ; 
she's — but I'm getting off the track. To go back, 
when the thing was over we went to get our hats. I 
found mine all right, but Kendall's was missing. He 
began to look around for it, and suddenly he gave a 
sort of jump. 

' By Jove that fellow's got my hat,' he whispered 
excitedly. ' Look there, Tilden, quick ! ' pointing to 
the person directly in front of us. 

Sure enough there stood a man with a hat in his 
hand exactly like Kendall's. The color, size, and 
style corresponded perfectly ; and even the trade-mark 
inside was the same. 

' It does look so, Fred,' I replied, ' but go slow 
about it.' 

' Go slow about it ? I see myself going slow and 
letting him or any other thief walk off with my hat. 
You just wait and see.' 

With these words he rushed up to the man, and in 
rather aperemptory tone jerked out : 



AGGIE LIFE. 



is 



' Sir, that is my hat which you have in your hand.' 

The man turned at this so that we could see his 
face. Instead of a sneak-thief we saw an elderly gen- 
tleman with a rather distinguished air. It struck me 
that I had seen him before, though for the life of me I 
couldn't think of his name. 

'What is that ? Pardon nie, but I fear you are 
mistaken. I hardly think this is your hat,' he 
responded, politely enough. 

The calm assurance of his answer raised Kendall's 
wrath to the boiling-point. He never could stand 
being contradicted, you know. 

'Why, but I say it is. Don't you suppose I know 
my own hat? I left it over there,' — indicating the 
place with a sweep of his hand — ' I came in, found it 
gone and here it is. You will find, sir ' — this with an 
attempt at dignity truly amusing — ' that it will be 
entirely unavailing for you to attempt to deceive me in 
the matter." 

The gentleman turned away, to hide a smile I 
thought, and then said in his most courteous tones : 

' Oh, very well. Since you are so certain about it, 
take the hat by all means. Accept my most humble 
apologies for my share in the mistake.' 

Kendall took the hat with a nod and followed me 
outside. 

' There, old fellow, you see what a little backbone 
will do. He saw that I meant what I said and that 
he couldn't bluff me. Tried to make out it was a 
mistake though. I should think a man of his age 
ought to be in better business than stealing hats.' 

• But are you sure it's yours ? ' I asked, ' It may 
have have been his after all.' 

' Of course it's mine. There isn't another like it in 
the city. He admitted it was mine too before I got 
through with him.' 

Knowing that argument was useless, I changed the 
subject and forgot all about the incident till the next 
morning when I saw the hat lying on his trunk. Out 
of curiosity, I picked it up and looked into it. Inside, 
I saw in small characters, a name. 

' Ho, Kendall, look here. There's a name in your 
hat.' 

He came, he saw — but he didn't conquer. The 
name wasn't ' Kendall ' by a good deal. The hat 
belonged to Congressman Spaulding. And Kendall 
wants to go to West Point. He's learned a lesson 



that will do him good, all right. That's all. Only, 
fellows, don't mention the word ' hat ' when he's 
around, unless you want an explosion." 



AN OCEAN STORM. 

Time never will erase from my memory the awe- 
inspiring sight of a great storm on the ocean. In the 
early fiftys I was second officer on the clipper Harpoon 
and.while off Cape Horn on a trip from Boston to San 
Francisco we encountered a succession of northeast 
gales which buffeted our ship about like a mere cockle- 
shell. One night I particularly remember; we had 
beco.Tie worn out by the constant strain to which we 
had been subjected, a heavy gale, which had kept us 
continually on deck, had been blowing for some days 
and life lines were run fore and aft to enable us to 
get about with some degree of safety, but other than a 
thorough seaman would find it extremely dangerous to 
attempt a passage across the decks. The ship pitched 
and rolled frightfully ; the wind swept through the 
rigging with terrifying shrieks and moans ; so great was 
the din that the captain who was lashed to the weather 
snigger shrouds, could not make himself heard even 
with the aid of his speaking trumpet. The decks were 
strewn with junk and pieces of stoven boats which 
washed hither and yon as the ship pitched forward or 
shipped a heavy sea. 

One look at the raging sea was enough to strike 
terror to the bravest heart, the phosphorescent light 
giving to the crest of each gigantic wave the appear- 
ance of immense streaks of molten fire, running as 
far as the eye could reach. 

We were laying to under a double-reefed fore-course 
with the proverbial gunny-bag of oil suspended from 
our jib-boom to lessen the danger of being swamped 
by a breaking wave. I went below to get my night 
peajacket and as I came up the companion way I was 
transfixed to the spot by the sight of a mountainous 
wave larger than its fellows, rolling down upon us with 
great sheets of luminous spray driven before it by the 
force of the wind. In my terror it seemed to be higher 
than our top gallant yard. The captain bellowed some 
order to the men lashed to the wheel but his words 
were blown away and he was unable to make himself 
understood. Then there came a terrible crash, I 
closed my eyes to shut out the terrible sight, a tremend- 
ous quiver went through the ship, she gave a fearful 



t6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lurch, and seemed to sink under the enormous weight 
of the water on her decks. Instinctively I grasped the 
brass raiHng which was on the after-house ; a great 
rush of water surrounded me and nearly took me off 
my feet, I held to the rail for dear life and happily was 
not swept away. Opening my eyes and glancing round 
I saw a sight that beggars all description, the foremast 
had broken off at the deck and was lying athwart the 
ship the canvass was blowing to shreds, and the yards 
and rigging were trailing over the side ; the bulworks 
on the leeward side were carried away, together with 
two yawl-boats which hung at the side davits ; and the 
decks were strewn with the debris. 

During the momentary lull which followed this 
onslaught of the elements, I heard the captain shout 
" Man overboard." All eyes were turned to the 
leeward, several life buoys were thrown, but all to no 
avail. God help a man overboard in such a sea. It 
was utterly impossible to lanch a boat and it is extremely 
Improbable that the poor fellow ever breathed after 
being struck by the water, so great was the force of 
the blow. 

A crew was sent forward to clear the wreckage from 
the decks and set it adrift. With a great amount of 
labor and the aid of a timely sea, we were enabled to 
float the spars and tangle rigging clear of the ship. 
The first officer who had been below to examine the 
hold for a possible leak, now reported three feet of 
water already in the hold and rapidly rising. Crews 
were immediately sent to man the pumps, and the men 
realizing their danger worked with a will and to such 
good purpose that the water did not gain on them to 
any extent, and to add to our good fortune the gale 
seemed to be abating. The men at the pumps were 
relieved every hour and we entertained strong hopes 
of working the ship to Valparaiso and there make the 
necessary repairs to enable us to proceed on our voyage. 
Next morning the wind had ceased to blow with that 
rending, tearing force peculiar to the fall winds of that 
latitude and we made as much sail as our crippled 
condition would permit ; the ship did not plunge and 
twist as wildly as before thereby lessening the leak and 
the men were enabled to gain on the leak and lower 
the water in the hold. Next day the sun broke through 
the clouds long enough to allow the captain and first 
officer to get our bearings. The course was at once 
shaped for Valparaiso, and after many days of toil and 



anxiety we reached the harbor and at once began our 
repairs. We found that the ship had sprung a butt on 
one of the lower steakes of her planking, and had 
strained her deck in a number of places. Our voyage 
from Valparaiso to San Francisco was without mishap 
and the delightful weather and fair winds were in sharp 
contrast to our experiences off Cape Horn. 



WHERE MARTYRS AND POETS LIVED 
AND DIED. 

Anyone who is at all interested in the early history 
of the war of the Revolution, or in the famous school 
of thinkers, writers, and poets for which the town of 
Concord is famous will find the time well spent in a 
visit to that quiet and altogether most delightfully 
pleasant town. It is easily accessible, and anyone 
passing through on the cars should not fail to take 
advantage of the opportunity afforded to pay a visit to 
this historic ground consecrated forever to the cause 
of freedom, and forever made famous by the residence 
of Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Alcott, Channing, 
Ripley, and their contemporaries, 

I do not imagine that it would be easy to find in all 
New England a spot more interesting for its associa- 
tions and literary history than is the town of Concord. 
Hundreds of tourists and of those who are interested 
in the lives and works of these men visit annually 
the homes which have sheltered the geniuses of their 
time. 

It is a pleasant task to search for the relics of the 
lives of those men ; and pleasant, too, to feel as one 
looks upon the Emerson House, the Old Manse, or 
the site of the cabin in the woods that here indeed 
it was that Emerson thought and wrote, or here, Haw- 
thorne pondered on the subtle workings of human 
nature, or here, Henry David studied woodland life 
and hoed his garden of beans. One can almost feel 
that these men are somewhere present, hiding, per- 
haps, from the curious eyes of a strange generation. 

Remembering the natures of these men one might 
almost expect to see Emerson come forth with a 
genial greeting, looking as benevolent and sunny as 
ever; or in his search to find Hawthorne buried in 
deeper recesses yet than those in which he hid him- 
self from the eyes of his own generation ; or while 
roaming about Walden to see Thoreau's countenance 
reflected from the crystal waters of the pond. The 



AGGIE LIFE. 



17 



imagination does, indeed, carry one a long way into 
the tinne wtien tiiese men lived, until one can almost 
trace the footprints of their tread. Not until the 
pretty streets of this town are left behind is the spell 
cast off, or till one has looked upon the resting-places 
of the dead does the present make itself fully felt. 

Perhaps the one thing that at first most impresses 
the visitor to Concord is the quietness that everywhere 
prevails, as though the gentle river that flows so 
silently through its meadows had made the serenity of 
its own life felt in that of the inhabitants of the town. 
Added to the quietness is the charm of beautiful 
streets, lined with comely maples, and tall, stately 
elms, which in the summer give a pleasant shade and 
in the autumn a pleasing effect of brilliantly colored 
leaves, many-hued. 

The Battle Ground, for many, is probably the first 
place of interest. In approaching the scene of the 
fight from Monument Square you must needs pass by 
the Old Manse ; but you will probably leave this for 
closer study until you have looked over the fighting 
ground. 

You will find it of profit to have read, befo re visit- 
ing Concord the introductory chapter to "Mosses from 
an Old Manse " in which is a delightful description of 
the old Homestead, and some mention of the Battle 
Ground. 

Running up from the river is a stone-wall which 
divides the historic ground from the land adjoining. 
At the base of this wall, a short distance up from the 
bridge, is the grave of the two British soldiers first 
killed in the fight, and where they fell near by stands 
a monument. Across the bridge is another monu- 
ment, the figure of a sturdy farmer leaving his work 
in the field, and with gun in hand hastening to the 
scene of conflict. It is a fine representation of the 
Minute-man of the Revolution as we would imagine 
him to have appeared. This is the side occupied by 
the patriot forces during the fight. The British had 
crossed over the bridge to the east side and attempt- 
ing to tear up the planks, firing ensued. Davis and 
his comrade fell under the British fire. Over the 
bodies of their fallen comrades the patriots discharged 
their muskets, killing and wounding, and causing con- 
fusion in the ranks of King George's men who with- 
drew to the town. 

The old bridge remained for a long time ; but in 



1875 anew one was built, although the road to Acton 
had been for many years over another route. It is 
now a quiet and beautiful spot. The peacefulness of 
the scene, once so stormy, is heightened by the river 
that flows so lazily beneath the spanning arch. 
Should you visit this spot in summer you would be 
attracted by the beauty of this stream, with its grassy 
banks, on the margin of which the pickerel weed and 
yellow water-lilies grow. In the autumn, after the 
foliage is gone, the scene changes to a more pictur- 
esque one, and you get a very pretty effect of hill and 
meadow in the longer stretch of scenery brought 
into view. 

Now, leaving the Battle Ground and returning to 
the traveled road you again pass the Old Manse as 
you go towards the centre of the town. Here you 
must be content with a view from the road. The 
old weather-beaten structure appears to-day just as it 
seems as though it must have appeared for the last 
century. In front of the house, and leading from the 
gate to the door, is an avenue of trees which partly 
hide the house from view and although you would 
fain get a closer look, you at least have the satisfac- 
tion of seeing where Emerson wrote his Nature, and 
Hawthorne some of his most delightful studies. 

In the centre of the town are tablets here and there 
which mark points of interest for the stranger. The 
old Wright Tavern where the British officer's dined 
in still standing, and is even now accustomed to 
administer to the wants of hungry travelers. 

Leaving Monument Square again and journeying 
towards Lexington you approach the later home of 
the sage and philosopher of Concord. It is a large 
squarely-built house of respectable but not particularly 
imposing appearance, with a picket fence and tall 
square gate posts shutting out the street from the pre- 
cincts of the home. Dark pines shade the pathway 
of marble slabs that leads from the gateway to the 
door. Here Emerson lived and gathered around him 
that bright galaxy of literary men and women. 
Very few there were who could resist the influence of 
his attractive personality. Margaret Fuller and Haw- 
thorne retained a relatively large proportion of their 
independence, but most of those who were associated 
with him as citizens or friends were deeply influenced 
by his personality and philosophy. 

While the stranger will visit Emerson's home as 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the shrine of a great Intellect, the inhabitants of the 
town, particularly those who knew E.nsrson, will 
remember the place as the home of a loving and lov- 
able man. He sought, as it were, to live in the eyas 
of all men. His was a transparent and sunny nature ; 
but his sunniness has been described as more that of 
cheerfulness than of intense warmth of feeling — a 
predominance of light over heat. And. indeed, it is 
not strange that the descendant of so many generations 
of clergymen should be a little warped. The human 
quality was not most intense in Emerson. But that 
he was a man after the character of a man his own 
age has testified, and to their testimony another gen- 
eration is adding its appreciation. 

A little* way beyond the Emerson House, on the 
Lexington Road, is Wayside which Hawthorne bought 
of Alcott, and where he lived during the last years of 
his life. The house is very near the street — too near, 
I should imagine, for the reticent Hawthorne, but he 
surmounted the difficulty by building a cupola on the 
roof which he used as his study. Here he often 
went for the seclusion he so loved. The land slopes 
up directly in back of the house forming a hill which 
is covered v/ith a woody growth which also covers the 
slope on the west side of the house, to the street. It 
is a pretty place, and with its cupola and wooded hill 
must have furnished seclusion enough. Here the 
man of dreams might indulge in his moody fancies 
with no one to disturb him. 

The singularly retiring character of Hawthorne is 
an interesting one. It seems strange that he should 
have gone so far in rejecting the companionship of men. 
The depth and earnestness with which he carried his 
investigations into the workings of human nature 
causes some wonder. I believe it was Alcott who 
said that he believed Hawthorne inherited some of 
his peculiarities from some ancestor who was a smug- 
gler, or perhaps even an old pirate, and that in his 
investigations of sin he was expiating for the sins of 
his progenitors. 

A few steps beyond Wayside, on the same side of 
the road, is the Orchard House, which was owned and 
occupied by the Alcott family. Here lived one of 
" nature's gentlemen," and the one with whom 
Emerson, in the middle portion of his life most like 
to talk. His daughter, Louisa, famous for her " Little 
Men" and "Little Women" also lived and wrote here, 



To the left of the Orchard House, a little higher up 
on the slope of the hill, is the Hillside Chapel, where 
the meetings of the Concord School of Philosophy 
were held. It is a small building, tall and narrow, 
with a very steep roof and looks for all the world like 
some barn or other outbuilding. One would hardly 
imagine that it had ever housed a school of philoso- 
phers. Its external appearance is like that of an 
unpainted board that has been exposed to the weather. 
But that it has been such a distinguished school-house 
suffices to give it considerable importance in the eyes 
of the tourist. 

There are also on the Lexington Road many places 
that are interesting from an historical point of view. 
This was the road over which the British fled in such 
disorder more than an hundred years ago, and tablets 
are erected here and there along the way to mark the 
spots that figured most prominently in that memorable 
retreat. 

About a mile and a half from the town, in a south- 
easterly direction lies that remarkable sheet of water, 
Walden Pond, and not far from its shore is the site of 
the cabin that sheltered the Hermit of the Woods. 
Here Thoreau, that man of queer experiments, lived 
a year to see how cheaply he could subsist and to 
study forest life. Of his experience we are given a good 
idea in his book " Walden." Though -filled with 
much that is utterly impracticable, this book contains 
a good deal that is well worth reading for its beauty of 
thought. 

Thoreau sympathized deeply with nature as mani- 
fested in the field and forest life about him, but man's 
laws and pustoms, and mode of living seemed to 
rankle in his heart. Wasson argued hard with him 
to prove that customs are the sensible logic of man- 
kind, but Thoreau chose rather to make his history 
one separate from that of his fellow men. He did 
not recognize the highest truth, and his ideas, if carried 
into practice, would wreck the civilization of the 
world. That such a student of nature should have 
held such pronounced antithetic ideas regarding the 
human race is unaccountable. He may have referred 
only to his own individual life, but even then he must 
have seen the necessity of things which nature has 
ordained. 

But Thoreau, notwithstanding his fallacious ideas, is 
an interesting character, and his study of woodland 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



life has given us many a glimpse into the secrets of 
nature, and to those who have read his writings, a 
higher appreciation of the birds and the flowers. It is 
known that Emerson by contact with him gained a 
higher appreciation of nature. 

The stranger in Concord should not fail to pay a 
visit to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Entering at the 
gate and proceeding for a little way you will come to 
a summer booth, which overlooks an enclosure sur- 
rounded by knolls making a sort of amphitheatre. On 
a knoll lying nearly opposite to the summer house are 
the graves of Emerson, Hawthorne and Thoreau. 
The grave of Emerson is marked by a beautiful piece 
of rose quartz rock in which is fastened a plate of 
bronze bearing Emerson's name. Hawthorne's rest- 
ing-place is surrounded by a hedge and is marked at 
both head and root by a tablet bearing the inscription, 
" Hawthorne." Thoreau's grave is in the family lot 
and is marked by a simple stone. 

Trees over all shade the spot and give it a more 
secluded aspect. Hawthorne in death as in life, has 
found his beloved seclusion, but the hedge which sur- 
rounds the grave is somewhat the worse for relic- 
loving tourists who are not averse to robbing the graves 
of the dead. 



n\pr^%%ion% of ai 



ler. 



The Idler has, in the last few weeks, heard a great 
deal about Senates and Senators. People came and 
said: " The Senate has decreed this," or " The Sen- 
ate will not allow that." It stirred him up a great 
deal, so that at last he began to inquire about the 
Senate to find out what it is. He found a great deal 
about aged men, sages and prophets of the Romans. 
He looked deeper, and began to trace it back to mod- 
ern times, it had a great deal to do with laws and law- 
making. At last he traced it into Aggie and there he 
found a body of young men, strong in mind and body, 
who made the lavv^s of the students and attended to 
their enforcements. He looked up the matter fully 
and became convinced that this institution, even 
though it might stir up rebellious feelings, would, none 
the less, continue to be a ruling power, more to be 
feared than the secret Senate of Venice, more to be 
respected than the venerable Senate of the Roman 
people. The Idler extends caution to those who 



would tamper with the chained dog. 

When the Idler strolled to his breakfast at ten, a 
few mornings since, he was electrified to find that a 
sidewalk had sprung up in the night. He had heard 
strange rumors and had even questioned a little, but 
had discredited them all, thinking that it was like 
every other improvem.ent and that it would come with 
time. He pinched himself and rubbed his eyes to 
make sure that he was not dreaming, and even re- 
quested one of his companions to kick him, which 
was done with a hearty good will. He at last con- 
cluded that it was another example of complete change 
of heart and in his opinion it was the greatest of all. 

It is customary at this season of the year for us to 
be inflicted with various sonnets and ballads, telling 
the story of the sweetness and juiciness of the grape ; 
but although the Idler has strained his ears for even 
one song he has never heard a note. He has in- 
quired into this peculiar state of affairs and has dis- 
covered that it is not due to the sour grapes, but 
rather to the zeal and care of the " Husbandman." 
He has heard stories of conflict ; he has been regaled 
with the wonderful records made by sprinters, but 
never has he been treated with the real article. The 
Idler even ventured to stroll into the vineyard and 
there he was captured by means of fish nets, revolvers 
and bludgeons, carried by the care-taker, the prince 
of husbandmen. He was dragged to his captors' den, 
and there he was obliged to endure all the, terrors of 
the •' Spanish Inquisition," until he would divulge 
his name and promise with his hand on the Bible 
never to enter the sacred precinct again. He has re- 
formed now and can sign himself a good. 

Idler. 



THE PATH OF FAME. 

V/e are living in an age of hero worship, in a time 
when all eyes are turned upon the man of the hour. 
We eagerly wait for men to ennoble themselves in our 
eyes and then in a day we cast them aside. At the 
present time Admiral Dewey occupies a pinnacle of 
fame but before one year has gone he will have passed 
in review before the nation and will probably have to 
give way to another. Thus we see that our hero is 
ever changing. 

Since the days of Washington we have had many 
men worthy of being highly honored by our nation. 



20 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Where are their names? They are all gone, they are 
practically forgotten. The sum of all their deeds, 
all their bravery, and all their glory is heaped upon the 
hero of the hour. All had their day of fame, for some 
a short one, for others a long one, but the sun of pop- 
ular favor has set upon all alike and they have all 
been swallowed up in the night of obscurity of which 
there is no morning. 

The paths that lead to glory are many and very 
different. Some lead through the quagmires of polit- 
ical corruption. Some lead through battlefields dark- 
ened with the smoke of the fray and some lead 
through ceaseless labor to the heights of fame. 

Men who follow this first path attain glory easily 
but like all things easily of attainment, their glory 
soon vanishes and they are left more wretched than 
before. In this class we find the least sincerity, the 
least honesty and the least honor. But for outward 
show they surpass. Like the many-colored autumn 
leaf that glitters brightest in the sun on the day that it 
falls to the earth the corrupt politician shines forth the 
more brilliant on the eve of his downfall. 

Of the next class of public heroes there are fewer. 
Those who travel this path find their way more difficult 
and find more obstacles to overcome. Although they 
often mount the last rounds of the ladder aided by 
others the start must be made by them alone. The 
battle field hero remains longer in the eyes of the 
people than the politicians but he is sure to fall. 
While the issues for which he fought continues to be 
remembered he remains a hero but at last he, too, is 
forgotten. His glory was won with difficulty but it 
existed a longer time. 

The last path is of all the most stony and the most 
circuitous and there has been a steady incline upward 
which grows more steep as the top is approached. But 
when once fame is reached Its duration is measured 
by the life of nations. The philosopher, the chemist, 
the mathematician, become famous only by ceaseless 
labor, but this labor once done remains forever. Thus 
we have seen how our heroes have climbed the ladder 
of fame and how short has been the ascendency of 
even the most stable of them, and we feel with the 
poet the uselessness of all this strife. 

The boast of heraldry the pomp and power, 
And all that beauty all that wealth ere gave. 

Await alike the inevitable hour, 

The^paths of^glory lead but to the grave, 



Colle^^ f^otfs- 



— Where's the rope ? Where is the Pull ? 

— Howard Baker, 1900, is living in Dr. Stone's 
house on Mt. Pleasant. 

— The Zoological Museum will be open every 
afternoon from 3-15 to 4-15. 

— A party of sporty Sophomores drove to Green- 
field to the fair on the 21st. Too bad it rained. 

— A large delegation of Aggies attended "The 
Christian " in the opera house at Northampton on 
Sept. 28. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker will represent the college 
at the inauguration of Arthur T. Hadley as president 
of Yale University. 

— The football coach, Fred Murphy, dislocated his 
shoulder in a practice game on the campus. Dr. 
Clark of Amherst reset the shoulder. 

— During Dr. C. A. Goessmann's absence the De- 
partment of Fertilizer Analysis.. Chemical Laboratory, 
Hatch Experiment Station is in charge of Henri D. 
Haskins. 

— The room in the Chemical Laboratory formerly 
occupied by the Veternary Department has been 
fitted as a private laboratory and office for Dr. C. 
Wellington. 

— Mr. Mark Munson visited the fair in Brattleboro 
one day last week. Marcus reports many wonders 
but none to be compared with one. " a slack wire 
with a girl walking on it one inch in diameter." 

— President H. H. Goodell addressed the " Thurs- 
day Morning Club " of Great Barrington, Mass., at 
the meeting held Sept. 17. The subject of the Pres- 
ident's address was, " The Agriculture of the East." 

— Iht Amherst Record reports over 1100 cousins 
at Smith College this year. Won't it be nice when 
the electric road to Hamp in finished — and yet some- 
one in that same Record is continually kicking about 
it. 

— The latest reports from Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey 
state that the doctor is on the sure road to recovery. 
Considerable time to regain lost strength will be 
necessary but we may expect to see him around very 
soon. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



21 



— The periodicals belonging to the Reading Room 
association were sold at public auction on Friday 
evening, Sept. 29. They will be delivered to the 
buyers throughout the year as they are taken from the 
Room. 

— A new sidewalk has been constructed leading 
from North College across the ravine to the Boarding 
Club House. It is a good substantial board walk and 
its usefulness will be highly appreciated during the 
wet and muddy winter and spring weather. 

— The boys were given a day off as usual to visit 
the Hampshire Agr'l Fair. They were also given 
free tickets to encourage them to be present. Among 
the attractions were one bicycle smash-up, two horse- 
trots, and three fights but not a single fakir. 

— A very severe storm passed over this vicinity on 
the afternoon of Sept. 25th. The Meteorological 
Station report a total rainfall of 1.72 inches, 1.5 
inches falling in twenty-five minutes. It is one of the 
most rapid rainfalls on record at this station. 

— The wall on the south gable of the tower which 
was destroyed by the wind in a storm last winter, has 
at last been rebuilt. It was found necessary to use 
new stone for the trimming as the old was so much 
broken by its fall to the ground that it was of no 
further use. 

— The two members of the Faculty elected to the 
Advisory Board by the students at the mass meeting 
held Sept. 8, found that they were unable to serve on 
'account the unusual amount of work that each is re- 
quired to do in his own department. Prof. Has- 
brouck and Dr. Stone have been elected to fill the 
vacancies. 

— The Freshman-Sophomore cane rush at Am- 
herst College was held on Saturday evening Sept. 23d. 
The judges awarded the victory to the Freshman 
class, the score being 23 to 22. The score is rather 
remarkable when we consider that 23 to 22 means 
that 45 hands were upon the cane and the cane only 
four feet long. Each hand occupied a whole inch. 

The Reading Room is undergoing considerable re- 
pairs. The daily papers will be placed in the old 
racks on the east side of the room. The other racks 
are being removed and a table is being placed against 
the west wall the entire length of the room. Cases 



to hold the magazines and weeklies will be placed 
upon the table. The passage through the entry will 
be reopened. 

— No doubt it is too bad that the military bulletin 
board in the passageway through North College has 
remained unused for such a long time, but that is no 
reason why any freshman should presume to think it a 
fit place to exhibit photographs of himself — no matter 
how manly his face and graceful his pose may be. 
If the gentleman in question, or any member of his 
class, have any desire to have his face placed in a 
glass case, please speak to the Senate and the affair 
will be attended to in the most satisfactory manner. 

— The football team has played two games so far 
this season. The boys are playing a good game and 
the result is very encouraging. They are working 
hard every day under the instructions of Coach 
Murphy and Captain Halligan. A great deal of inter- 
est is taken in the team by the student body and there 
is considerable competition for positions. The new 
men are doing well and before the season is over may 
replace some of the old players. A strong scrub 
lined up against the 'varsity in a thirty minute game 
on Wednesday last and although unable to score or to 
prevent the 'varsity from scoring, they proved that we 
have considerable reserve material that can be used 
if needed. 



A LETTER TO THE EDITOR. 

To THE Editor of the Aggie Life : 

My Dear Sir: Permit me to send you a brief 
sketch of my movements since leaving Amherst, 
hoping that my communication may prove of some 
interest to your readers. My crossing the Atlantic 
ocean was favored with the best of weather, and the 
life on the steamer " Kaiser Wilhelm der Crosse " 
was very enjoyable. We travelled at the rate of 528 
to 538 miles per day, with a sea as smooth as a river. 
Arriving at Bremerhaven on the seventh day and after 
a few hours rest at Bremen, I left by rail for Ufiinster, 
the seat of the government of the Prussian Province, 
Westphalen, to visit some near relatives. 

The country surrounding the city is very level, dotted 
with windmills and in many respects similar to the 
adjoining districts of Holland. 

Among the many educational institutions of Miins- 



22 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ter there is one of special interest to agriculturists, an 
Agricultural Experiment Station [Landwirth-schaft- 
liche Versuchs Station] which, since its establishment 
in 1871, has been under the able direction of Dr. J. 
Koenig, the well known author of " Die Chemische 
Untersuchung der Nahrungsmitteliitc. The institu- 
tion is located in the new part of the city, not far 
from the railroad station, in very pleasant surroundings. 
The laboratory building which is situated in a garden 
containing ample provisions for a variety of experi- 
ments carried on in open air and under glass, is a sub- 
stantial, large three story building originally used, in 
part at least, as a dwelling house. The different divis- 
ions are well equipped for the work to be carried on. 
Steam power is largely and profitably used in various 
directions. The laboratory work of the station 
embraces analyses of commercial fertilizers, food and 
feedstuffs ; soils and soil-tests ; examination of seeds, 
besides bacteriological investigation in different direc- 
tions. The Provincial agricultural interests as 
required by laws, receive a special attention in all 
directions ; yet apparently not at the exclusion of a 
series of interesting questions of a more general 
scientific importance. The out door work, as 
explained to me, includes among others, the study of 
the changes which polluted waters, from various 
sources, undergo in consequence of different chemical 
treatment as well as their effect on the life of plants 
and fishes. The condition for the growth of water 
plants and the changes of sewage water passing 
through layers of different kinds of soil, natural and 
artificial are subjects of daily study. The details of 
many of these investigations are too intricate to admit 
of a well deserved discussion in this short article but 
all illustrates the untiring efforts of our scientifc breth- 
ren in the search for truth. With my best wishes for 
the prosperity of your paper, and the interests it 
represents, 1 am, Yours very truly, 

C. A. GOESSMANN. 

Miinster, Sept. 18, 1899. 



Freshman — I smell cabbage burning. 

Senior — You have your head too near the stove. 



Ex. 



o-fe^. 



" Would you not like to gaze on Niagara forever?" 
" Oh, no ; I shouldn't like to have a cataract always 
before my eyes." 



Holy Cross, 1 1 ; Aggie, 0. 

Our football team suffered defeat in its first game 
of the season, at the hands of Holy Cross, at Wor- 
cester, Mass., by the above score. 

All of the points scored by our opponents were 
secured during the first six minutes of the game. 
After this Aggie took a " brace," and seemed more 
determined than ever, not to allow Holy Cross to repeat 
her score of last year, for it was generally known that 
no score of less than thirty points would be at all satis- 
factory to our worthy opponents. 

Holy Cross made most of her gains by means of 
mass plays outside of tackle, while our boys made 
fine gains through tackle and guard. 

On one magnificent plunge through Holy Cross's 
line, Chickering got clear of everyone except Powers, 
the full-back, who finally managed to bring him dov/n. 
Stanley also made a fine run of about 30 yards on a 
similar plunge through the opponent's line. 

The best work for Holy Cross was done by Mercer 
and Kenney, while Aggie's line was almost impene- 
trable after the first few minutes of play. The sum- 
mary is as follows : 

Holy Cross. - M. A, C. 

Monahan, 1. e. r. e., Snell 

Noonan (IVlcQuade), 1. t. r. t.. Cooke 

Connor, 1. g. r. g,, Gamwell 

McCabe, c. c, Bridgeforth 

McTigue, r. g., 1. g., Stanley 

Toohig, r. t. I. t., Bodfish 

W, Sullivan, r. e. 1. e,, Rogers (O'Hearn) 

J. Sullivan, q. b. q. b,, Dunbar 

Mercer, 1. h. b. r. h. b., Barry 

Kenney, r. h. b. 1, h. b., Pieson, Chickering 

Powers, f. b. f. b., Halligan 

Score — Holy Cross 11, M. A. C. 0. Touchdowns — Powers, 
Monahan. Goals from touchdowns — Kenney. Umpire — -L. 
S. Parmenter, Amherst. Referee — M. J. Thompson, Holy 
Cross. Linesmen — L.J, Corcoran, Holy Cross, S. L.Shaw, 
Amherst. Time — 20 and 15 minute halves. 

Wesleyan, 27; M. A. C, 0. 

We were defeated by the Wesleyan team at Mid- 
dletown Saturday by the above score. Our team was 
simply out-classed. 

The summary is as follows : 



AGGIE LIFE. 



23 



M. A. C. 

r. e., Snell 

r. t., Cooke 

r. g., Camwell 

c Bridgeforth 

1. g., Stanley 

1. t., Bodfish, Pierson 

1. e., O'Hearn 

q. b., Dunbar. Canto 

r. h.b., Barry 

1. h.b., Chickering 

f. b., Halligan 

Touchdowns — Rymer 2, Inglis, Wilcox, Hartzell. Goals — 
Inglis 2. Umpire — Rice, Referee — Davis. Linesmen — 
Jones and Rogers. Halves — 20 and 15 minutes. 



Welleyan. 

S. Dodds, 1. e. 

Yarrow, 1. t. 

Browne. 1. g. 

Sullivan, c. 

Tufkin, r. g. 

Montgomery, King, r. t. 

Cornwall, r. e. 

C. Dodds, q. b. 

HArtzell, 1. h. b. 

Rymer, Wilcox, Lacy, r. h. b. 

Inglis, f. b.. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

A History of European Fauna by R. S. Scharf , F. L. 
S. Our somewhat limited data on the historic Euro- 
pean fauna is the means by which many geographical 
and geological problems of the Old World are solved. 
That the British Isles were once a part of the main- 
land, that Spain was once connected across the straits 
of Gibraltar with Morocco and that many parts of 
Europe now fertile lands were once the basins of 
inland seas are all facts proven by the presence or 
absence of certain animal remains. We have reason 
to believe that the different forms of animal life orig- 
inated separately each in a certain locality and subse- 
quently changed the extent of their habitat by migra- 
tion. These points the author thoroughly discusses, 
dwelling for the most part upon the various migrations 
and their importance in scientific researches. 

Volcanoes : Their Structure and Significance, by T. 
G. Bonney, D. Sc, Professor of Geology in University 
College, London. This is a clear and very readable 
account of the present extent of knowledge concerning 
the nature and sequence of volcanic phenomena. It 
is not burdened with scientific details or technical 
terms but nevertheless it contains a trustworthy dis- 
cussion of the most recent researches of geologists. 
The book begins with the life histories of some of the 
most important volcanoes, including Vesuvius, Strom- 
boli and Cotopaxi with descriptions of a number of cel- 
ebrated volcanic outbursts. Following in order is a 
treatise on the products of volcanoes, discussions on 
their distribution and geological history and a study of 
their dissection by the hand of Nature. 



The International Year 5oo^ for year 1898, edited 
by Prof. Colby of New York University and Prof. 
Peck of Columbia University. A work purposing to 
be a compendium of the world's progress for such an 
eventful year is necessarily a large one. The year 
was a remarkable one in almost all lines of activity — 
in science, literature, art, and in industrial and com- 
mercial progress. A brief survey of all the important 
events and lines of progress is to be found in this book 
with numerous tables of statistics, maps and illustra- 
tions, arranged as far as possible in cyclopaedic form. 

David Harum by Westcott and The Day's Work by 
Kipling are too well known to attempt a review. The 
library is indebted for these books to those who have 
so generously contributed in the way of library fines. 



cha^n^ej. 



We are pleased to acknowledge among our 
exchanges the Wisconsin Times, the representative 
paper of the Wisconsin School for the Deaf. April 
19, 1852, ten years previous to the framing and pass- 
ing of the act which established our own college and 
its sister institutions, the Legislature of Wisconsin 
passed the act Incorporating the School for the Deaf. 
We should judge from the columns of the Times that 
the institution is doing good work. 

We like the plan of the Western Oxford. It Is a 
quarterly published In magazine form. The number 
under our notice is that of the last quarter. In criti- 
cism we would say that the space devoted to editorials 
seems a little too short for a magazine which conducts 
an editorial department. The studies are very good. 
Might not a longer story be an improvement? It 
gives an opportunity to work in the principle of sus- 
pense which to successfully introduce requires skill 
and therefore practice. We would particularly men- 
tion the story entitled " An Overland Passenger," 
which if not an absolute fact, at least possesses a very 
striking verisimilitude, and enlists one's interest 
from start to finish. The poem "Sailing" is good. 
The four foot verse is well adapted and the whole con- 
veys some adequate idea of those delightful gliding, 
soaring, rocking sensations which are felt all in one 
while sailing. The notes are spicy and interesting. 



24 



AGGIE LIFE. 



To shave your face and brush your hair 
And then your best new suit to wear — 

That's perspiration. 
And then upon the car to ride 
A mile or two, a walk beside — 

That's transportation. 
And then before the door to smile, 
To think you'll stop a good long while — 

That's expectation. 
And then to find her not at home. 
That homeward you will have to roam — 

That's thunderation — Ex. 

The Fisherman's Song," publishsd in The Stylus 
. It sounds a Httle Uke Kingsley. We quote : 

Sing ho ! my lads, for the bounding deep, 

Sing ho ! for the deep blue sea ; 
Oh, wives and sweethearts sore may weep, 
Sing ho! my lads, for the rolling deep. 
And some beneath the waves will sleep. 

Ere home we come with song of glee ; 
Sing ho ! my lads for the cruel deep. 

Sing ho ! for the pitiless sea. 



'90. — Charles H. Jones, Assistant Chemist, Bur- 
lington, Vt. Experiment Station was visiting in town 
last week. 

'92. — J. E. Deuel, was married on Sept. 28, to 
Miss Jennie R. Ledden, at Gloucester City, N. J. 
At home in Amherst after Nov. 1. The Life extends 
its best wishes. 

'92.— M. H. Williams, M. D. V. Harvard Univer- 
sity '94, has purchased a place in Sunderland, where 
he intends to settle and open up a practice. 

'94. — A. H. Kirkland, secretary of the Association 
of Economic Entomologists, is author of a report, 
just received at the college library, of the meeting of 
the above association held at Columbus, Ohio, in 
August, 1899. 

'96. — A. B. Cook has sold his poultry business at 
Petersham and accepted, July 1 a position as Assist- 
ant Gardener for A. M. Young, at Pine Orchard, 
Conn. Notice was also received of the marriage of 
Mr. Cook to Miss Emma L. Shepardson of Amherst, 
on July 23, last. Congratulations are extended, 
although rather late in the season. 



'96. — W. L. Pentecost, is at present Superintend- 
ent of a milk farm in Leicester. Address care of 
Edward Warren. 

'98. — Alex Montgomery, Jr. with the Waban Rose 
Conservatory, Natick. 

TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



ARKNta ^ AOWHOUS^, 



AMHa$r, Aa$$. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 60 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 eta. 

Remember these suits are pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand- 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
•34 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Secofid door south of Post Office. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



OHIOH TEIHEBS' fl^EpiES OF mWM. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pil'sbui'g, Toronto, New Oilcans, New York, •Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis ami Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WASHINGTON, D. G., Of PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BEOWK, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



3*9 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Canter as and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St., 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents, 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



A.GUiK iu'it'L^. 



Start in Basiness for Yoarself. 



SUCCESS ASSURED. 



Send 50e. for our sj'stem, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our jieople making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. T^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
WWil IN STOVES Rl BSIES. 

AGENT FOR THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 



Telephone 5C-4. 



C R. EIL 



i»- 



(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUf^BlNO AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



J. F. CAMPION, 

ASniONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY 

ly All suits made in my own work-shops. ,^J 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehasetts flgpieultural College. 

AT THE 

OOIiIiEGS FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Percliiiron Horses ant! Souiown Siieep, 

And we beg t« announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amhbkst, Mass. 



AGGIE LiF: 



COLLEGE CO-0?EHATiyE SOOIET!, 
Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and. best. Our prices lowest. 



OPPOSITE TOWN HAi-t-. 



•W, "W. MOTISTOTS, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, Geils' Fumisligs, 

FINE REAOY-liAOE SUITS, 

ALSO 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.60. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



RiVEit Street, 



NOUTUAMPTOK, MASS. 



E. B. DICKINSOH, S. B. B. 



WILLIAMS' block:, 



AMHEPv,ST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO IS A.. Ts/L., l-SO TO 5 I=- 3Vn. 



:e=e:.^^:eii^v<i:..^cist. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVEBYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OP STUDENTS' 

DKESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHEK, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IK-CriBEIHIEB O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



S^IRepairing done while you ■ivait,„SlSr 
2 PMfENlX ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY AND FEED STABLE 



T. E. FAIGS, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BA.RGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AXITY STSEUT, AMHERST, MASS, 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calla responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



and Carpet Renovatini Establisliment. 



A.g:e:i© A.g:exxt, 



H. Iv. ctc.?%.r«E> »oo 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

Office : 
Next Dooe West of Amity St. School House. 



ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



ige's ptlletlG Outfltti 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



S4 and 86 Fratiklin Street, - 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. Kelton. 



•? 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, [ 



pooLTRY, mmmi fish m oystehs. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Ilolyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDiO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



108 Main Stkeet, Nokthampton, Mass. 

Telephona connection. 




Consider— If Ton can feeep the wet ont 
of your rifle it will not rusinoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 



I 



matlon about po wderSiblack and smoke- 
less; proper sizes. Quantities, how to 
load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed. 
Jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, (etc.: 
trajectories, velocitie3,peuetrations. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
, 1,000 other things, including many trade 
ft secrets never before given to the public. 
i\ Free if vou will send stamps for postage to 
V: The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



& 



m^^^'^'^'-''-!^^ 



HEADQUARTERS FOR AGGIE STUDENTS. 



RAZORS HONBD, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

C. R. KENFIELD, 

z= la: o T o o- :rs -<^ z= EI E IS . 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, ^2.00 and $2.50 x)er doz. 
Cards, §1.50 and §1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A.MMEB,ST, MASS. 



Hmberst Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 



THE AMHERST 

FURNITUREJIND CARPET STORE. 


Ptmm flKD EllGl?ftVlHG COIBPflHY. 

Printing 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 


A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 


Speeial attention given to Hld^^'^lass Illastuated 
Book and l«agazine Wo»k. 

lV.Vc.T.t7A^''- 50 flrcn street, Boston, Plass. 

TELEPHONE, BOSTON 860. 


MASS.JlGRICULTOI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST. MASS. 


All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 


E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amhekst, Mass. 


We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 
generally, that we are prepared to supply- 
in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 


J. A. RAWSON, 


For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYIS/ARD. 

AMHERST. MASS. 


DEALER IN 

WflTGHES, GliOGKS, JEWELRY 


GLYNN, 


FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 


4TAI LOR> 

* 






REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 


Repairing Neatly Done. 


S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 


Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 


A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 


HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 


MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



>!> :-T H El: — z^ t * 

flibaesacbueetts 

Hgricultural 



• OFFERS ® 

1. A SHORT WINTEB. COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botanj-, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

•2. A FOUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 




Oet. 18, 1899 







IL. X. 



NO. 3. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH1N03. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest ot new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



K^, :^. .A^^j^^^TK^OB^o-. 



A. B. CA 

273 Hain St., 



MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON,,:^^ 
GIVE US A CALL. 



FJL^^ 



An eittirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AfflHERST HOUSE DilUG STORE. 



W'. 



nm/m 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0., $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $^.00. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICEIS RIGHT. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELER 



BOLLESE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in oiir repair department. 

4®=-EYES FITTED FREE=ffi9- 
By a graduate of Dr. Fostek, Occulist. 




coi:jIj.a.e,s 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 




LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 18, 1899, 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do n'ot receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES EDWARD HALLIGAN, '00, Athletics. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARi.ES LESLIE RICE, '01. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ofi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdl'tb rials. 



We are pleased to note the increased interest which 
seems to be taken in the agricultural and scientific 
papers contained in the library reading room. These 
papers and magazines are the best of their kind and 
contain much valuable information on scientific sub- 
jects. Many of them contain the results of investiga- 
tion, not yet published in book form. On this ac- 
count they are of particular importance to him who is 
interested in scientific research. This reading room 
and the one in North College furnishes a fine collec- 
tion of publications which enables people to be abreast 
of the times on all subjects. 



The Life wishes to say a word to the alumni with 
regards to the Alumni Notes which are published in 
each issue. These notes are compiled from informa- 
tion collected in various places. For a great part of 
this information we are indebted to President Goodell 
and to alumni connected with the Experiment Station. 
What we propose to do is to send a circular letter to 



each alumnus requesting him to acquaint us with any 
information which he may have concerning alumni. 
We hope that those who are in a position to give us 
information will do so. To the undergraduate the 
alumni column rarely presents anything of interest 
but we can readily see how to the alumnus it is more 
interesting than any one other department of the 
paper. To those alumni who eagerly scan the paper 
for information concerning their old college mates we 
hope to appeal most strongly and we wish to make 
each feel that he owes to the paper what informa- 
tion he may possess. 



In previous years it has been the custom here at 
college to hold lectures under the auspices of the 
Natural History Society. These lectures though 
very excellent in themselves were of necessity poorly 
attended and in view of this fact no attempt will be 
made to continue the plan this winter. The Union 
lecture course will however furnish an opportunity for 
all those who wish to attend lectures. This course 
has been run for several years with great success. 
Some of its points of superiority are its cheapness, its 



a6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



variety and the popularity of the speakers and sub- 
jects. Several musical entertainments, which have 
always proved very popular, are to be given in the 
course. Those who are more or less occupied with 
the study of subjects strictly scientific find a relief in 
a lecture which treats of things in a practical way 
without going too deep into the underlying principles. 
To accomplish just this end and at the same time 
furnish valuable information is the object of the Union 
lecture course, a detailed account of which will be 
found elsewhere in this issue. 



At a meeting of the Fraternity conference held 
recently it was decided to hold a social gathering in 
the chapel upon Saturday evening, Oct. 21. A com- 
mittee was appointed to make the necessary arrange- 
ments and we understand that an excellent program 
has been planned. Our football team is to play Trin- 
ity during the day and we hope to be able to make 
the celebration a double one. One of the objects 
which the Fraternity conference had in mind when 
the gathering was proposed was to give the freshmen 
something in place of the social life from which they 
were excluded by the Fraternity agreement. Another 
equally important object was to keep alive the enthu- 
siasm which is manifested everywhere at present and 
to direct this enthusiasm along beneficial lines. An- 
other matter which was discussed at the Fraternity 
conference meeting was the holding of a dancing 
class in the Drill Hall during the winter term. In past 
years a class has been held but the attendance has 
been rather poor. The idea now proposed is to hold 
a class which all who wish to, may attend. In this 
way a dancing teacher might be hired much more 
cheaply than if payed by each individual. It has 
been suggested that the money to cover the expenses 
of such a class be raised by public subscription or by 
assessing those who attend. 



TWO TRAMPS. 

In the summer of 1895 a friend and I started out to 
take our summer vacation. We were rather short of 
funds after our college year and we were at loss to 
know just how to make our allowance carry us through 
until the opening of the fall term. At last we hit upon 
an idea which although not original, had still many 
points to recommend it. Our plan was to turn tramps 



for the summer and to live the free careless life of 
the tramp whom we had so often met. Truthfully I must 
say that we would both of us have liked much better 
to spend our summer at home, but as our homes were 
in California,going there was out of the question. We de- 
cided to make the whole country our field of opera- 
tion and to drift about without regard to time or place. 
We prepared some of our old clothes to carry with us 
until we should be many miles from our college and 
friends. When we had passed the danger of recogni- 
tion we were to make the exchange and send our re- 
spectable clothes back to a friend, by express. 

The morning after we had heard the results of our 
final examinations we started and went by train to a 
small town about ten miles distant. At this place we 
waited until noon and when the station agent 
went home for dinner, we went into the station 
and changed our clothes. I must say that I felt a lit- 
tle faint-hearted as I looked at my companion in his 
tattered suit. But we had both gone too far to quit 
then and we would not have done so had we been 
able to. We carefully folded up our good clothes and 
left them where the station agent would find them. 
We also left a note asking him to send the package 
by express to our friend at college. 

Our first experience came soon after we had donned 
our old clothes and it gave us promise of an exciting 
season. After leaving the station we started out into 
a thinly settled country where we met but few people 
to stare at us in our embarrassment. We had not 
gone far when we came to a prosperous looking farm. 
On one side of the road was a field of corn which 
served but poorly to hide from view a patch of straw- 
berries beyond. Without thinking for a moment on 
the probability of there being an owner of the berries 
we sprang lightly over the wall and were soon walking 
between the rows of low corn. We were not allowed 
to reach our object, however, for scarcely had we 
gotten half way when a large dog that had been lying 
lazily in the sun near the house woke up with a start 
and as if by instinct made straight for us. We were 
hardly counting on this kind of a greeting but we still 
thought it best to hold our ground. My companion, 
who had been a pitcher upon our college nine, grasped 
a few stones and when the animal was a few rods 
away he sent in a volley which brought an answer of 
barks and yelps. Another stone changed the animal's 



AGGIE LIFE. 



27 



mind completely, and instead of continuing as the 
aggressor he turned and dashed away through the 
corn. We then thought that we had the field to our- 
selves and proceeded to gather some of the berries 
but we were soon startled by a shrill whistle from the 
vicinity of the house. We looked in that direction 
and saw an old farmer and two younger men coming 
at us through the corn. We decided to have recourse 
to our former tactics if necessary, and gathered a 
number of stones, retreating as we did so. The 
farmer came on in front followed by his dog who evi- 
dently seemed an unwilling participant in the affair. 
When they were within speaking distance we could 
hear the abuse that the farmer was heaping upon us, 
and we threw a large stone at him by way of warn- 
ing. The stone missed him but struck the unfortu- 
nate dog, who made off again as fast as he could run. 
The loss of this much of his forces brought the old 
man to a standstill. He began to threaten us with 
all kinds of punishment, but we took no notice of him 
except to keep on making retreat with our stones in 
readiness. Soon we were out of the ploughed land 
and we turned and ran with speed that would easily 
have won us a place on our college track team. The 
farmer and his sons kept falling farther in the rear and 
we felt no more fear of them until we found ourselves 
on a narrow strip of land with water on both sides of 
us. We soon discovered that we were running straight 
into a river which took a considerable bend at the 
point where we were. In a few seconds we were at 
the water's edge and stopping, just long enough to see 
the farmer, we ran out into the water. The river was 
a wide one and we had gone but a short way when we 
perceived that the water was getting deeper and we 
would soon be in over our heads if we continued. 
Neither of us cared to try swimming with our wet 
clothes so there was no alternative but to wait until 
the farmer came up and to make terms of peace with 
him. He was not long in making his appearance and 
his face bore a smile of suceess. 

" Now you're caught," he cried, standing on the 
bank and shaking his big brown fist at us. '' You fel- 
lows near killed that dog of mine, that's worth more'n 
the both of you." " Ned, " he cried, turning to one 
of his sons, " You just go fetch that dog and we'll see 
which is the better on an equal footing." 

I began to feel cold and clammy all over as I stood 



there with the water up to my shoulders. I cared 
but little for the dog when in the open field, but being 
there in the water changed the situation. I turned 
inquiringly to my companion, but his face bore its us- 
ual look of self possession and he said nothing. 

We waited there for some time until at last it 
seemed almost a relief to see the dog coming up with 
the farmer's son. " Get at 'em. Tiger," cried the 
youth. The dog, seeming to realize our situation, 
sprang into the water and came at us confidently. 
My companion stood a little in front with his arms 
folded at the surface of the water. When the dog 
came up he quickly grasped him by the nose and col- 
lar and forced his head under water. The dog kicked 
and splashed a great deal but he was in firm hands 
and it was all to no avail. The farmer furious with 
rage would have rushed into the water had not my 
friend brought the dog to the surface and given him a 
breath of air in time to save his life. He then turned 
to the farmer and told him that we were willing to call 
it square and go away, but if he persisted in following us 
his ill-fated dog would suffer in consequence. The 
old man seemed to see the sense of our argument and 
agreed to say no more if we allowed the dog to go 
uninjured. We then walked to the bank and the dog 
scampered off through the grass. The farmer was so 
glad to see his dog safe again that he forgot his an- 
tipathy for us and even asked us up to the house. On 
our way up, despite our wet clothing, we stopped at 
the strawberry patch and ate some more of the ber- 
ries. At the house we met the farmer's wife, a good- 
natured woman about fifty, and her daughter, a young 
girl about twenty. They seemed sorry to see us in 
such a condition but we explained that such things 
were but every day circumstances in our lives. While 
we were standing there the dog came trotting up and 
lay down near me, but on noticing my companion, 
he got up and ran away. We then thanked the far- 
mer for his kindness and started away feeling in the best 
of spirits except for our wet clothes. Later in our 
career as tramps we had occasion to meet our friend 
quite often much to our mutual advantage. 

(to be continued.) 



HERRICK'S FIRST RACE. 

Some of the Haverhill men were lounging in the 
dressing room discussing the chances of success in 



28 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the dual meet with Swartham College ; and judging 
by their expressions their chances were small. 

" There's our best miler over on the mattress, run 
off his feet in the half mile by that Swatham man. If 
he had won, the meet would be ours, but now we've 
got to get that mile somehow. Now if Herrick — " 

A slightly built nervous fellow sitting quietly by him- 
self gave a start and flushed when he heard his name 
mentioned. He could guess what they were saying 
and he knew that all of them were turning to him as a 
forlorn hope to win the meet for their college ; they 
did not encourage him or try to cheer him up, they 
were in no such mood, but instead they seemed to 
look at him with disfavor for not being a good enough 
runner to win the mile. He felt his responsibility and 
their att!tude towards him severely ; he was young 
and sensitive. Just then a man stuck his head in the 
doorway and shouted, " Last call for the mile run 1 " 
A buzz of excitement at once arose, Herrick's heart 
seemed to take a violent leap into his throat, his head 
reeled ; the trainer bustled up to him, gave him some 
advice, which he heard as if in a dream, slapped him 
on the back, and told him to come back on the fel- 
lows' shoulders or on a litter. 

When Herrick reached the starting place the other 
runners were waiting for him. He was formally intro- 
duced to the Swartham men, whom he had never seen 
before but of whom he had been told : Tillman, who 
can do the distance any day in less than four forty and 
who likes to run his opponents off their feet ; Penker- 
man, who is a strong finisher ; and Haskins, who is 
used to set a fast pace. How lonely Herrick feels ; 
their best miler is in the dressing room unfit to run, 
his only other colleague, Cutler, can it is true keep up 
a fast gait but is unable to spurt at the finish, and he 
himself who has just started to train this spring and 
who nas never before competed in an intercollegiate 
meet, has to overcome all obstacles and win the race. 
But he knows what he is to do — he and Cutler have 
their instructions. 

" Get on your marks." Again that lump in his 
throat. 

" Get set ! " How his knees shake. 

Bang! Cutler shoots ahead and gets the pole, 
Herrick is right behind him. It seems more like a 
half mile race the pace is so fast. They swing around 
into the home stretch, Herrick just back of Cutler, 



Haskins third, Tillman chaffing at fourth place. Till- 
man doesn't seem to be running with his usual assur- 
ance. First quarter sixty-three seconds ! How is he 
going to run his opponents off their feet when of their 
own accord they set so fast a pace ? As they pass 
the bleachers Tillman shoots to the lead, as much as 
to say, " two can play at this game." He runs as if 
trying to shake off his competitors. Second quarter 
sixty-two seconds ! Tillman leading, Herrick right 
at his heels, and the others out of the race. Herrick's 
long, light stride comes in handy for this rapid gait, 
nevertheless his breath comes in gasps and his stride 
is perceptably shorter. He looks admiringly at Till- 
man, — how can he keep up such a gait ? But he 
can't ; setting such a pace the second quarter tells on 
him, his stride also lessens. Third quarter seventy- 
one seconds, Tillman leading by five yards. As they 
pass the bleachers nothing but the crunch of cinders 
and gasps of the runners is heard, the silence is pain- 
ful, each one of the audience is utterly oblivious to 
everything save the two runners who are to decide the 
day. Tillman's powerful clockwork stride is broken. 
Herrick's is short and uncertain. They swing around 
the first curve and on to the straightaway slowly and 
laboriously, Tillman still leading. They creep around 
the last curve, — what a state of tension the audience 
is in. They are on the home stretch, Tillman stum- 
bles, Herrick is even with him. The former recovers 
and passes Herrick. They are fifty yards from the 
finish. The spell is broken ; the crowd arises as one 
man, sway to and fro, shout, wave banners. Herrick 
never before had hundreds of spectators cheering him 
on, it stimulates him, he lurches ahead of Tillman 
twenty-five yards from the finish. He staggers, Till- 
man comes abreast, they run thus until within a few 
feet of the finish, when Herrick with a frantic effort 
throws himself across the tape and drops to the ground 
the winner. 



THE COLLEGE COURSE OF TO-DAY. 

The college course of to-day differs vastly in its 
purpose and in its results from the college course of 
fifty years ago. Then only young men who wished to 
fit themselves for some profession entered college 
where there was very little practical instruction given. 
They became versed in things which entered very 
little into the life of most men. Educators of that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



29 



time seemed to shun every day subjects. If they 
were told that a mechanic could learn his trade much 
more quickly and easily by attending a college than 
by serving an apprenticeship, they would consider the 
subject as not worth consideration. To-day all this is 
changed and the rank and file of our college men are 
not fitting themselves for a profession but to become 
business men or producers in some line of industry. 
To-day we find instruction given in all subjects that in 
any way benefit mankind. 

The opportunities open to young men desiring an 
education were never so great as they are to-day. 
We have in every state in the Union at least one col- 
lege where free scholarships are given to the students 
and in most states there are many such colleges. In 
many of our colleges we have labor funds whereby 
young men who are willing to work can receive fair 
pay for their services. Student cooperation has also 
been a powerful factor in bringing college expenses to 
a minimum. 

The motives which prompt young men to start upon 
a four year course of study are many and varied. All 
students are desirous of a general education but most 
have in addition a desire to fit themselves for their 
life work while in college. This demand for educa- 
tion along particular lines of work has brought into 
existence a large number of technical colleges of 
every description and covering almost every occupa- 
tion of man. The success of colleges of this kind has 
kept on increasing until now the number of students 
attending them is surprisingly large. With this vast 
field open for the activities of educators we can ex- 
pect wonderful advancement in the next fifty years. 

At present we have many departments of industry 
where work is done in an unscientific way and where 
the utilization of materials is carried on with great 
waste. The reason for this is that whatever advance- 
ment was made in the methods employed found no 
means of becoming dispersed. The leaders of these 
industries are perhaps practical men but they have 
never learned the fundamental principles which gov- 
ern the processes which they employ in their business. 
This condition of affairs is fast changing and the suc- 
cessful superintendent can no longer afford to ignore 
science. Science probes into his operations even 
against his will and convinces him of his mistakes. 

The political economist tells us that one of the 



obstacles to competition in labor is the lack of educa- 
tion of the laborer. Men without a thorough educa- 
tion find, it almost impossible to change their employ- 
ment after they have reached fifty. This ability to 
grasp new situations should alone be worth the time 
spent in obtaining an education. 

The college of to-day while it is calculated to pro- 
duce the highest development of the student by throw- 
ing him upon his own responsibility. But this very 
act which makes advancement possible may make 
room for mistakes and disasters. The young man 
who sets out with the intention of building up his 
moral as well as intellectual side will find opportuni- 
ties everywhere for such development. On the other 
hand the willfully indifferent student can find associ- 
ates and opportunities for his full moral degradation. 

One of the severest drawbacks which the student 
has at times to encounter is the lack of time. He is 
liable to find too little time for all which he wishes to 
do. His athletics and recreation are liable to take 
more of his time than he should really spend upon 
them. In this case the promptness of the managers 
of athletic teams can do much toward saving the 
time of the student. Another waste of time comes in 
loitering before meals and between recitations. One 
of the best ways of saving time is to have a well de- 
fined plan in mind and to adhere to it as closely as 
possible. 

The student should choose his friends with the 
greatest care for upon their influence will depend 
many of his actions while in college. He should draw 
a distinct line between his acquaintance and his 
associates. 

On the whole a college course increases a man's 
power many times over, and this increased power is felt 
by the community just as much if he expends his energy 
doing evil or doing good. In the one case he merits 
the contempt of the community while in the other he 
gains its respect. 

Raven. 



A SKETCH. 

It was nearing night ; a dark cloud was covering up 
the last vestiges of the retiring sun, and even now the 
cold drops were beginning to fall making dreariness all 
the more dreary. 

Two persons, a man and a woman, bent with age 



30 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and worn with fatigue, were slowly making their way 
along the streets of a small out-of-the-way village. 
The old man with his shaking forefinger was pointing 
out familiar scenes to his companion who kept nod- 
ding her head in recognition. 

" See," he kept saying, " we are nearing the end 
of the village and the dear old home appears nowhere. 
It must have been demolished long ago." 

But fatigue was fast becoming a detriment to fur- 
ther travel, and the old man feebly tottered to the 
door of a miserable cottage, knocked, and was 
answered by a woman even more feeble than either 
of them. 

"Come in," she said, " and share with me what- 
ever I have, I will soon need no more myself." 

The rough interior as well as the exterior showed 
her extreme poverty. A large stone fire-place, in 
which smoldered a smoky fire of water-logged wood, 
added to its gloominess. 

" Ah," said the old man, breaking the stillness, " we 
were brought up in this village. As we went along we 
were noting the relics which still remained after our 
long absence, but there was one thing above all , the 
memory of which brought us here ; that we sa*^ no 
vestige of our old home — how happy it was. It all 
remains fixed in my mind — the pretty little cottage 
with its vine-covered porch and low roof. You re- 
member, my dear sister," speaking to his companion, 
" our dear mother and father. Where have they 
gone ? Oh, would that we had always stayed with 
them to the end. Our regrets are many but late. 
The place where, it seems to me, the cottage stood, 
is occupied by a lofty stone building. We went there 
asking shelter from the night and they turned us 
from the door with the words : ' We do not shelter 
beggars.' I almost wished the earth would open and 
swallow us up, I was so shamed, for even the poor 
have hearts. Respect for age is the first and great 
requisite of a gentleman or a lady. We, therefore, 
wandered on and on hoping to find among the poor 
some pitying spirit, for having suffered themselves 
they know how to pity others. We came here — you 
received us into your poor lodgings and are feeding us 
although it takes the food from your own mouth. The 
more honor to you." 

Silence reigned again. The town bell was ringing 
to anounce the hour. Their hostess was weeping and 



shaking with emotion in her feebleness. 

"I remember it all," she said, "I am your mother.'' 
And tottering forward with uncertain step she fell into 
her son's arms mingling her tears with his. " My 
dear son and daughter, at last you have returned in 
answer to my prayers. Ah, happy me, blest above all 
creatures on earth — now we are together again and 
shall remain so always." 

In the morning the brother and sister arose rested 
in body and satisfied in their minds ; but the old lady 
never rose again. There she lay the breath of life 
gone forever but on her face a sweet smile — the last 
remnant of earthly joy. 



MANUFACTURE OF SUGAR FROM BEETS. 

It is now a century and a half since Margraff first 
extracted a few crystals of sugar from beets. This 
humble experiment started the long series of investiga- 
tions and improvements resulting in the gigantic 
industry that has produced many millions of tons of 
sugar. Before this industry could be fully established 
many things had to be done in the way of improvement 
both to the beets and to the machinery employed. 
The beets which Margrave was obliged to use in his 
experiments rarely contained over five per cent of sugar 
while to-day as high as twenty per cent is found in the 
best sugar beets. 

The growing of sugar beets may properly be classed 
as gardening rather than farming. The beet requires a 
considerable amount of careful tillage necessarily slow 
and tedious. For the best growth and development the 
sugar beet requires a rather heavy soil not too stony 
and not hilly or uneven. One of the first mistake that 
farmers make is, to little tillage and preparation of the 
soil. The nature of the soil upon which beets should be 
grown is such that it yields the best results only with 
thorough tillage. The seed is put in about one half an 
inch deep and as soon as the plants appear they should 
be cultivated frequently. This cultivation should be kept 
up until the beet leaves have grown sufficiently to shade 
the ground. The enemies of the beet crop are neither 
numerous nor particularly hard to handle. An average 
crop will produce about fourteen tons of beets per acre 
and the labor of growing and harvesting will cost about 
thirty-five dollars. The best beets for sugar purposes 
are the smaller beets about three inches in diameter. 
Beets which protrude above ground or have a split root 



AGGIE LIFE. 



31 



are worthless for the manufacture of sugar. 

There has been an annual importation of sugar to 
the United States amounting to $100,000,000 while 
there existed right at home the latent forces necessary 
to produce this amount of wealth if only the farmers 
would awaken to the realization of the fact. Beets 
have been grown in almost every state in the Union 
with more or less success, but it has been clearly 
demonstrated that only within certain limits is the busi- 
ness profitable. The profitable production of sugar 
from beets is pre-eminently the result of painstaking 
investigation and there is still much to learn with 
regards to it. Of one thing we may be certain how- 
ever, and that is that the beet sugar industry has come 
to the United States to stay and beet sugar will 
soon be ranked among her most profitable products. 



zi% fio-t^%. 



—Foot Ball. 

— Trinity next. 

— Charles Tinkham of Roxbury Mass. has entered 
the Freshman Class. 

— A teachers' convention was held in Amherst Fri- 
day Oct. 1 3. Prof. G. F. Mills was one of the speakers. 

— Last Thursday was observed as Mountain Day by 
Smith College. Many of the girls visited Amherst 
Hill. 

— President H, H. Goodell addressed the" Farmer's 
, National Convention'' held in Boston Oct. 3 ; his sub- 
ject was, "The Mission of Experiment Stations." 

— The inauguration of Arthur T.Hadley as president 
of Yale University takes place to-day. The program 
as arranged show the exercises to be very elaborate. 
Dr. C. S. Walker represents Aggie. 

— Since our last issue the Amherst football team has 
met and conquered two teams that our boys will meet 
later in the season. Williston was beaten by a score 
of 22 to and Worcester Tech by a score of 24 to 5. 
Amherst and Trinity tied, 0-0. 

— Captain O'hearn of the Freshman class lined his 
men up against the South Hadley High School on 
the campus Oct. 1 1 . The game was rather slow at 
times but the freshmen played well for their first game. 
The result was a victory for the Aggies. The score, 
16-0. 



• — The grand stand on the Pratt Field was com- 
pletely destroyed by fire on the night of September 30. 
The five is supposed to have originated in the heater. 
The loss was fully covered by insurance. It is reported 
that Frederick Pratt who presented the stand to 
Amherst College has signified his intention to have it 
rebuilt at once. 

— President George Harris of Amherst College was 
inaugurated on Oct. 1 1. Delegates from nearly every 
large college in New England were present and a few 
from New York. Among the most noticable were 
President Eliot of Harvard, President Hadley of Yale, 
President Low of Columbia. A college yell was given 
by the students fi^ each representative. 

— The Sophomore Class observed Wednesday last 
as mountain day. The " Notch " -was visited and the 
mountains to the east. The party unfortunately, lost 
their way, the driver of the barge was in an unfamiliar 
country and the matter was left to the instinct of the 
horses, they surely would find their way home, the boys 
thought. But the horses misunderstood for at the end 
of a half hour they pulled up at the Belchertown Fair. 

— During the absence of the Class of 1902, who 
had gone away on their mountain trip, some Freshmen 
entered some of the Sophomore rooms and " stacked " 
them in a pretty thorough manner. Of course the 
Sophomores did not like it, and in a revengeful spirit 
broke into some Freshman rooms the next day and 
proceeded to make one mighty pile of all the contents. 
This is the first work of this nature that has taken place 
about college since the year that the present Seniors 
were Freshmen. 

— An interesting meeting has been arranged by the 
Fraternity Conference to be held in the chapel building 
on Saturday evening October 12. All graduates and 
undergraduates and members of the Faculty are invited 
to be present. The final program has not been fully 
arranged. Among the events of the evening will be 
singing by the entire college, selections by the Glee 
Club, selections by the class quartets, music by the 
banjo club and the new college orchestra. Refresh- 
ments, will be served and a good time will be given. 
The meeting will last from 8 to 10. 

— The foot-ball team is continuing to do good work. 
The boys have practiced hard and are now in the best 
of condition. The results of the games so far this 



32 



AGGIE LIFE. 



season are very encouraging although the important 
games are yet to be played. To-day our team meets 
Brown University at Providence and we are confident 
the men will make a good showing ; still we won't 
think it anything to their discredit if they do not suc- 
ceed in beating the team that held University of Penn. 
for a tie game, 6-6, on October?. On Saturday next 
the team plays Trinity at Hartford. The first home 
game will be with The Springfield Training School on 
October 25. A second eleven has worked well and 
given the varsity good practice in both offensive and 
defensive work. The manager of the varsity, C. L. 
Rice, has arranged a game for the seconds with the 
Northampton Y. M. G. A. to be played on the campus 
Saturday -Oct. 28. The team will be under the charge 
of W. R. Plerson, 1901. 

— The program for the "Union Lecture Course" 
has been arranged as follows : Oct. 25, Concert by the 
" Ladies Military Band " of Boston. Prof. D. W. 
Howard, conductor ; Nov. 8, Illustrated lecture by 
William Webster Ellsworth, secretary of The Century 
company New York. Subject, " Arnold and Andre;" 
Dec. 13, " An Evening of Mystery, Melody and Mirth " 
by Maro, the distinguished prestidigitatuer, musician, 
artist and shadowgraphist ; Jan. 10, lecture by Rev. 
Russell H. Conwell. The subject will be announced 
later : Jan. 24, concert by Mozart Symphony Club of 
New York; Jan. 31, lecture by President Harris. 
Subject not announced as yet ; Feb. 14, " Old Times 
Down South " including stories, sketches and songs by 
Polk Miller ; April 1 1 , concert by Central Lyman Con- 
cert Company. The regular price of admission will be 
as before: $1.00 for a season ticket or $2.00 for a 
season family ticket. Reserved seats were drawn on 
Wednesday last but there are more that can be obtained. 
The representatives from Aggie on the committee in 
charge of the course are Prof. F. S. Cooley and James 
W. Kellogg 1900. 



Impressions of an Idler, 



A life of ease and pleasure 
With never pain or care, 

An idle man's enjoyment 
Of nature bright and fair. 

Never a day of sadness. 
Never a sigh for me. 

I am the Aggie Idler, 
Happy, hale and free. 



It has been whispered in the Idler's ear, that the 
athletic association was intending to have a meet 
between the classes during this fall rerm. He has 
pondered on the subject during at least five pipes and 
decided to give the scheme his hearty support. He 
is not a runner, nor can he toss the hammer from the 
campus into the chestnut trees on Mt. Warner, but as 
far as wind goes, he is ready to back the plan to his 
last breath and he does not doubt that others will give 
a bit of muscle and perhaps some brains. It is evi- 
dent that if the college is to be represented at the 
Worcester meet the men must start training at once. 

If a class starts with a professor on a try for Botany 
specimens, or if the purpose is merely to see the hills 
from a different point of view, it is obviously dishonest 
of that class to drop the professor and make a little 
excursion of their own. The Idler never went on a 
Botany trip, so he Is not a judge of the attractions in 
the case, but it does look a bit dishonorable to obtain 
excuses from recitation on the grounds of a day de- 
voted to some study ; when the day is really put in on 
betting "niggers leads," or watching the "Human 
Lizard." If men have no regard for the study of 
plants they should, at least, consider the rights of 
others who are to hold the same position in the year 
to come. 

The Idler. 



MELANCHOLY. 

When you feel a sort of sadness 
Coming straight into your heart, 

Drive away this cruel demon, 
Thrust aside his poisoned dart. 

He would fill your soul with sorrow, 
He would take from you- all joy. 

All the pleasures of to-morrow 
He would certainly destroy. 

Cast him into outer darkness. 
Where forever he may roam, 

There with imps of night and shadows 
He will make his final home. 

Once you've driven out this monster 
With his weird ungainly train, 

Bar the gate by which he entered 
Let him not return again. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



33 



etic 



Aggie 17; Y. M. C. A., 0. 

Our team won an easy victory frona the Springfield 
Y, M. C. A. Saturday, Oct. 8, at Hampden park. 
The playing of both teams was loose but occasionally 
Aggie pulled together and played snappy ball. Most 
of the gains made by Springfield were through the 
centre. Several attempts were made to circle our 
ends but not once did she succeed. 

In the second half Springield rushed the ball for re- 
peated gains to our 10 yard line where our team held 
for downs. By good playing Aggie scored a safety 
and a goal before time was called. 

The summary : 
Aggies. Y. M. C. A. 

Aliearn, 1. e. 1. e., Shea 

Stanley, 1. t. 1. 1., Cowan 

Snell, 1. g. 1. g., Curran 

Paul, c. c, James 

Gamwell, r. g. r. g.. Pollard 

Cooke, r. t. r. t,, McCIary 

Bodfish, r. e. r. e., Worthington 

Chickering, 1. li. b. 1. h. b., Davis 

Barry, r. h. b. r. h. b.. Mace 

Canto, Whitman, q. b. q. b., Page, McKee, (Capt.) 

Halligan, (Capt.) f, b. f. b., Blodgeti 

Touchdowns — Bodfish and Halligan ; goal from field — 
Halligan. 

Aggie, 12; Pittsfield, 0. 

A crowd of 2000 people witnessed the football 
game on the Pittsfield Common Saturday, Oct. 14, 
when the Aggie team defeated the local eleven by a 
score of 12-0. The game was very interesting and 
full of sensational plays. Our goal was never in dan- 
ger. All the scoring was done in the first half. 
Chickering circled the right end for considerable gains 
while Bodfish made two runs of 25 and 20 yards 
respectively on a double pass. Cook opened up some 
large holes at tackle and several long gains were made 
by Stanley at this place. Once he went through for 
20 yards and a touchdown. 

In second half Aggie would have scored at least 
once had it not been for poor officiating. 

The offensive work of our team was very good but 
at times the defense was weak. 

The features of the game were the playing of Bod- 
fish, Chickering, and Stanley for Aggie and the work 
of Cooke for the Pittsfield team.. 



The summary is as follows : 

"Aggies," 
O'Hearn, 1. e., 
Cooke, 1. T., 
Gamwell, 1. g., 
Paul, c, 
Snell, r. g., 
Stanley, r, t., 
Bodfish, r. e.. 
Canto, Dunbar, q. b., 
Chickering, 1. h. b., 
Barry, r. h. b., 
Halligan, f. b.. 



Bicycle Club. 

r. e., Roberts 

r. t., Henry 

r. g.. Parrel] 

c, Green 

1. g., Blair 

1. t., Carey 

1. e., Oschman, Tanner 

q. b., Hearn 

r. h. b., Conlin 

1. h. b.. Cook 

f. b., Wilson 



Score — Aggie 12, Bicyle Club 0. Touchdowns — Paul, 
Stanley. Goals from touchdowns — Barry 2. Referee — John 
Nicholson. Umpire — C. L. Rice. Linesmen — Malcolm and 
Tremblay. 20 and 15-minute halves. 



THE STUDY OF FORESTRY. 

It seems rather surprising that considering the rapid 
destruction of our woodlands during the last half-cen- 
tury that practically no attempt has been made till 
recently among our colleges to establish a course in 
the science of forestry. In Europe special training- 
schools are common and an efficient body of practical 
foresters is the result. An elaborate system of man- 
agement exists there, which has saved the forests 
from complete destruction, and the continent from the 
disastrous effects of rapid denudation. In this country 
however, the art as such is almost unknown, and the 
result is seen in the thousands of hillsides once cov- 
ered with valuable timber, which are now destitute of 
of all vegetation. There can be no question but that 
an intelligent management would have saved the 
nation vast sums, and people are coming more and 
more to realize that fact. A widespread desire for 
instruction in the matter is plainly evident-, and in view 
of the importance of the question ought not to be dis- 
appointed. It may not be desirable for us to establish 
forest training schools, for it is improbable that the 
European system of government control will ever be 
introduced here. But if our state colleges could 
establish courses in it similar to those offered in bot- 
any, entomology and chemistry, it would prove of 
value to many. Certainly it would be a help to those 
pursuing an agricultural course, as there is hardly a 
farm in New England where some timber might not 
be profitably grown. 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



A number of years ago such a course was conducted 
here by Dr. B. E. Fernow, then of the Forestry 
Bureau of the National Department of Agriculture, 
but for some reason it has been discontinued. The 
most recent attempt in this line has been made by the 
state of New York. There a College of Forestry 
with Dr. Fernow as its head was started about a year 
ago. It is situated at Ithaca and is a department of 
Cornell University. To furnish practical instruction, 
a demonstration forest of thirty thousand acres located 
in the heart of the Adirondacks has been made over 
to the university for a term of thirty years. This will 
be a grand opportunity for original research and the 
report that the Forestry course is fast becoming one 
of the m.bst popular of Cornell electives is not hard to 
believe. Its progress is being closely watched by 
other states, and if it proves successful which it seems 
bound to do, similar provisions will doubtless be made 
in other localities. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Statistical Metl^ods, with special reference to Biologi- 
cal variation, by C. B. Davenport, instructor in Zool- 
ogy in Harvard University. This book contains the 
working formulae for use at Summer laboratories 
where material for variation study abounds. It 
appears intensely mathematical to the casual ob- 
server and illustrates the practical value of series and 
cosines to Biologists. 

Moulds, Mildews and Mushrooms, by Prof. Under- 
wood of Columbia University. This is a guide to the 
systematic study of the fungi and mycetozoa. The 
literature on these forms of plant life is extensive but 
scattered and no one work covers the whole subject. 
This work gives a brief synopsis of the principle gen- 
era and especially those containing plants of economic 
importance. The list of literature on each genera 
and the pen and ink illustrations are the main features 
of the book. 

The following recent publications in Physical Chem- 
istry have been added to the library : The Modern 
Theory of Solutions, translated by Professor Jones of 
Johns Hopkins and consisting of memoirs by such 
noted chemists as Pfeffer, Vant Hoff, Arrhenius and 
Raoult ; Physical Chemistry for Beginners, by Dr. 
Ch. Van Deventer a translation from the German by 
B. B. Boltwood, Ph. D., of Yale University ; Outlines 



of Physical Chemistry, by A. Reychler, a translation 
from the French ; and Physical Chemistry, by Dr. 
Morgan of Columbia University. 

The North American Slime Moulds by Professor 
Macbride of University of Iowa. This book contains 
a list of all species of myxomcetes hitherto described 
which are found in North and Central America. The 
original descriptions have been consulted in compiling 
this work and a list of the bibliography of each 
species is given. Nearly twenty full page plates are 
appended which contain excellent representations of 
all the different forms of native slime moulds. 

A Constitutional History of the American People, 
1776 — 1850, by Francis Newton Thorpe. This 
book contains the signs of progress in the ideas and 
opinions which the American people have held re- 
specting the principles, organizations and administra- 
tion of their civil institutions. Public opinion is the 
ruling power of a democracy. As the author states : 
" A constitutional history deals primarily with persons 
not with documents," and it is by a study of the peo- 
ple that he finds evidence of growth and amelioration 
in civil affairs. 

Quantitative Chemical Analysis, by Prof. Henry P. 
Talbot of Mass. Institute of Technology. This is an 
introductory course in quantitative analysis prepared 
to meet rhe needs of students who are just entering 
upon the subject after a course in qualitative analysis. 
After a few preliminary instructions in the uses and 
care of apparatus a number of analyses are given with 
details of procedure. The analyses selected by the 
author for practice are those affording the best prepa- 
ration for more advanced work. The chapter on 
stoichiometry found in the latter part of the book is 
believed to give the student sufficient knowledge of 
the subject to enable him to solve any ordinary prob- 
lem of quantitative analysis. 



C^ScKd^n^es- 



We are placing our exchanges in the college read- 
ing room where they may be accessable to all. We 
solicit a like favor from the editors by whom the 
Aggie Life is received. 

We have on our table the Inauguration Number of 
the Amherst Student. On the first page is a short 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



sketch of President Harris' life ; following this is a 
short account of the Inauguration exercises. A short 
editorial expresses the enthusiastic interest held 
among the students in the welfare of the college, and 
bids the new executive a hearty welcome. Dr. E. 
Winchester Donald's address then follows, and lastly 
the new president's inaugural address. The address 
of President Harris is full of thought on vital questions 
which everyone interested in college life must needs 
consider, and may be used with profit and pleasure by 
those not fortunate enough to have heard its delivery. 

The Breeze is a very neatly arranged paper. The 
paper is good ; good paper always recommends a 
journal to one's attention ; but that is not all. The 
general arrangement is excellent. Every department 
is divided off distinctly from every other, and all seems 
to be so planned that you can lay your finger with 
the greatest facility on anything in its columns. This 
is an important point. It shows the typical spirit of 
this hustling age. The paper is breezy throughout and 
very plainly shows the advantage of keeping the adver- 
tisements separate from the other matter, provided, of 
course, that this is financially possible. 

The papers are rolling in upon us again in large 
numbers. We are glad to see our many friends again, 
and to greet familiar covers. Some of our exchanges 
have come out in a new garb, which in most cases is 
attractive and an improvement over the old one. 

O, Rodistor, where is your Exchange Department ? 
You are neglecting your duty in failing to recognize 
the existence of your sister journals and by forgetting 
that they exist. Brace up ; your paper is very good 
otherwise. 

The /. S. C. Student is a weekly journal and while 
making no pretensions to literary completeness, it is 
full of interesting editorials. We see, on scanning the 
columns of the paper, that the institution has its own 
individual troubles, and that we are not, as we some- 
times think, exclusively visited by the relentless hand 
of fate in some things that we undertake. 

Speaking of student life at M. I. T., one of the edi- 
tors of The Tech says : " We can have at best but 
little college life, few chances for making life-long 
friendships, but let us not thoughtlessly pass by those 
things that will in years to come make dear to us the 
memory of our Alma Mater." Our own opportunities 



are apparent. Let no one depreciate the value of a 
strong and enduring friendship. 

From the Intercollegian we quote the following very 
expressive passage : "I should say that the first 
essential of success in college is that the student 
should get thoroughly out of his mind the notion that 
the college is to be the making of him, or, in other 
words, is to insure his success. The contrary is the 
fact. The college is simply an opportunity, plus an 
inspiration. It furnishes a vast array of books on 
many subjects, which contain the best thought of the 
world ; it gives access to museums and laboratories, 
and so invites thought and investigation. It has at 
hand, let us say, an accomplished staff of teachers for 
suggestion, for inspiration, and for guidance. But 
these will ensure nothing more than a perfunctory and 
barren result. They are helps, they are encourage- 
ments ; they may keep the student from falling, but 
they do not ensure his advance. It is only the student 
himself that can do the work." 

We do not consider our old friend, The Holy Cross 
Purple, last because it is least important. We are 
always glad to receive such a paper, and could praise 
it in no higher way than by wishing that we might see 
more papers of a standard as high and lofty as it 
m.aintains. 



umni. 



Ex-'71. — William Slattery, junior justice of the 
Holyoke police court, died at his home on Northamp- 
ton street, July 22, 1899. It is with regret that The 
Life announces the death of Justice Slattery. He 
had suffered for many months with a painful intestinal 
trouble, but his death was peaceful. His appointment 
to the junior justiceship came too late to be of any 
practical benefit to him, as he had been ill since Feb- 
ruary, at which time he was appointed. Judge Slat- 
tery's contemporaries at the bar included E. W. 
Chapin, now on the bench, Judge H. L. Sherman 
who died recently, lawyers T. B. O'Donnell, Under- 
wood, now dead, and the late Judge Pearsons. Al- 
though often urged to run for office — he was earnestly 
besought by the late Judge Pearsons to run for 
mayor — he steadfastly refused. His life was centered 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



in his law practice and in his home. He was a repub- 
lican in politics but never cared for office. His death 
has not been unexpected so that it comes with less of 
a shock to his friends and associates ; but Judge Slat- 
tery's loss will be felt, and his work in the quarter of a 
century of practice will not be forgotten. He was 
born in Ireland in 1849, and came to this country 
when but a child. Most of his early life was spent in 
Amherst. He graduated from the Holyoke High 
School in the late 60's, Rev. Dr. Parkhurst of New 
York city being then the principal. After studying 
three years at the Mass. Agricultural College, he 
graduated from the Harvard law school, and began 
practicing in Holyoke in 1863. His early studying 
for the bar was in the office of Lawyer Dickinson of 
Amherst. He was a member of the Knights of Col- 
umbus and of the Irish historical society, but pre- 
ferred his home to the lodge-room. In 1885 he mar- 
ried Miss Hannah McCoy, a teacher in the public 
schools and a sister of Rev. J. J. McCoy of Chicopee. 
He leaves besides his widow, six children, four boys 
and two girls, the oldest 12 years old. The Life ex- 
tends its sympathy to the bereaved family. 

Ex-'82. — Frank H. Joynes, Division Superinten- 
dent of construction of state roads west of Springfield. 
Resides in Dalton. 

'88. — Friends will be glad to hear of the birth, at 
Elizabeth, N. J., of a son, to Robert and Lottie A. 
Moore. 

Ex-'92. — R. P. Davidson, major and commandent, 
Northwestern Military Academy, Highland Park, 111. 

'94. — F. L. Greene received the York degree A. 
M. from Columbia University last June, and is now a 
teacher in Trinity school of New York City, residing 
at 410 W. 1 15th St., New York City. 

'94. — I. C. Greene. The friends of Mr. Greene 
will be glad to hear of the success he and his brother 
are having in the poultry business in which they make 
a specialty of raising black Minorcas, Partridge Coch- 
ins, white Wyandottes, rose comb brown Leghorns 
and Indian Games. Their stock is of the best, they 
having taken many first and second prizes this year at 
fairs in various parts of the states. 

'94. — Alverrus J. Morse, student at Boston Univer- 
sity Law School, Boston, Mass. 



'94. — Arthur C. Curtis, student at Emerson School 
of Oratory, Boston, Mass. 

'94. — Dr. Theodore S. Bacon, 6 Maple St., Spring- 
field, Mass. 

'95. — Walter L. Morse, engineering department, 
N. Y., N. H. A. H. R. R., Middleborough, Mass., 
box 464. 

'95. — Geo. A. Billings, ass't gardener on the estate 
of A. A. Pope, Farmington, Conn. 

'96. — A. M. Kramer, Clinton, Mass. 

'96. — Harry H. Roper was married to Miss Mabel 
Gleason at East Jaffrey, N. H., en August 24, 1899. 
The Life extends its best wishes for their happiness. 

'96. — H. G. Burrington is manager of Sunnyside 
farm, Fitchburg, Mass. 

'99. — Howard E. Maynard is a student in the jun- 
ior class, at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

'99. — W. E. Hinds is assistant at the Insectary 
Hatch Experiment Station. 

'99. — F. H. Turner, is in business at Great Bar- 
rington, Mass. 

'99. — Wm. H. Armstrong is a student in the 
School of Arts, Harvard University. 

'99.— B. H. Smith and M. H. Pingree have been 
appointed as assistants in the Chemical Laboratory. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits ure pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of bool^s, or hand- 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLiSHINQ CO., 
134 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Elite Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



AnHa$f , Aa$$. 



TEACHERS WANTED I 

DNioH TEecnERS' vmn OF 0|nEI|Ii;il. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pilisburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New Tork,-Washington, San 
Trancisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHlNGTON, D. G., OP PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BKOWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



AHHERaT, Mass 



Officb Hours : J x. m. to 6 r. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



H 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St., 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass- 



/iGGJi£ L,lFii. 



Start ifi Basifiess for Yoarself. 



SUCCESS ASSURED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our pco^Dle making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. __ 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New Yokk City. 



J. H. Tl^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
Wm IH STOVES Be IHIES. 

AGENT FOE THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 5G-4. 



(Successor to W. W. Hnut) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUiBiri A^O OAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 



AU suits made in my own work-shops. 
Savings Bank Block, - ' Amherst, Mass. 



fflassaehusetts flgpiealtufal College. 

AT THE 

COLI.£SaE FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Perctieron Horses and Soutndoi Mi 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For Information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to tlie student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 
MANUFACTUREK OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch iieer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. B. HICKINeON, B. B. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WII/lilAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO 12 A.. TS/L., 1-SO TO S F. HAl. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERTBODT. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OP 

ISTJBBEI^ O-OOIDS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Ag-Mepairing done while you wait.Str 
g FSCBNH JtOW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY m FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMXTT aTMHET, AXJBCJEJtST, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

, Caps, Glom, Geits' Foriisiis, 

FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



HE>:^:^"sr ^\.i>.^j^^^. 



E'zai.^^i^iiivdr.^cisT. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment, 



A^sele >2Vg:ea:xt, 



H. Iv. C£CA.I«K5 »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

"Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

ir^s;S-A.TISFA.CTIOi;r a-XT-A.I%A.3SrTBEID, eXS=^ 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



^Paitnilge's 0t|letic Oiitlitliie.* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banters. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



.F. 



D. B. KELTON. 



•> 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PeOLTBY, VEGETABLES, FISH HP OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



I 



PHOTOGRAPHSG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



108 Main Steeet, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



imaammum 




GonBider — If yon can keep the wet out 
of your rifle it will not rustnoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
telU aU about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about po\vders,black and sinoke- 
M- less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
Kt load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
\ jacketed^ soft-nosed, mushroom,] etc. ; 
SL trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All 
i^ calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
ffit , 1,000 other things, including many trade 
2^J i secrets never before given to the public. 
^}S\ Free ifyou will send stamps for postage to 
The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



HEADQUA RTERS FOR AGB!E STUDENTS. 

HAIR DRBSSING ROOMS. 

RAZORS HOHBO, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

E. N. PARISEAU, Proprietor. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

C. R. KENFIELD, 

:E=i3:oTOC3-is-^:E=:Ea:Eii3. 



Portrait and Group WorTc a Specialty. 
Prices always tlie lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets^ ^2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, §1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A.MSERST, MASS, 



Hmberst Ibouse^ 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EL, D. 

10 Phoenix Row, 



ARSH, 

Amherst, Mass. 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, GItOGKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WAKE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LAKGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



P%\tT\\i^ fljlt) EjlGt^RVlllG GOJIlPflllV. 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Speelal Attention given to Hldh»elass Illustvated 
Book and ]Qagazine Wopk. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 
SERVICE PROMPT. 

TELEPHONE, BOSTON 860. 



50 Bicli SM, Bostoq, mass. 



MASS. AGRICULTUI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department. 

AMHEKST. MASS. 

We "would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that ^^e are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shruhs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHBRST. MAS3. 



4TA I LP R. ^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



■ t > :the:: — =:;{' 

fllbassacbueetts 

HQricultural 

(Dollc^e 



• OFFERS • 

1. A SHORT WINTER COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST G-RABUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



m'^'^^\iU(yv^^ 




•MASS. 







... \. 



NO. 4. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH IN OS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 

5^. i^. .^K^jML^ori^oi^^o. 



A. B. CALL, 

273 Hain St., 



Society * Catering. 



|@*BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON.^^ 
GIVE US A CALL. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



JMMB® F. PM© 



^{Mi/9, 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.50. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $^.00. 



REIRAIRINO. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



GOILEOE 
JEWELER 



COLLEOE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

;8®=-EYES FITTED FREE.S?r 
By a graduate of Dr. Eostek, Occulist. 




I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



HARRY CLARK, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 




E LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS., NOVEMBER 1, 1899, 



NO. 4 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Agoie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will b« sent 
t« all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, "00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o* United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. .Mhlotic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'to rials. 



A COLLEGE bulletin board is a place where individ- 
uals and organizations can make their wants known to 
the college at large, and as such it should receive its 
full share of respect. Anyone who maliciously tears 
down a notice from the bulletin board injures not 
merely one man, but all who v/ould be in anyway 
interested in it. Nothing is more cowardly or more 
unmanly than trying to satisfy a personal grudge by 
interfering with any notice a man may wish to post. 



Sometime ago the Life offered a prize for the best 
story contributed by any member of the college. We 
regret to say that not one contribution was received 
under this head. This lack of contributions we would 
rather ascribed to indifference than to inability. From 
whatever standpoint we view it however, it shows a 
lack of spirit in the whole college along this line. We 
wish to call attention to the necessary qualifications 
of a candidate for election to the board of editors of 
the Life. Any man to be eligible to election must 



have contributed at least three articles to the paper, 
one of which must be contributed before the close of 
the fall term. 



The spirit shown by our freshman class in recog- 
nizing and apologizing for the mistake which they 
have made cannot fail to be appreciated by everyone. 
We very much regret that the " stacking " occurred 
but we think that the lesson which it taught will be 
a lasting one. There is plenty of room for all the 
spirit and enthusiasm which a class may possess to 
show itself in athletic contests but there is no room 
for unfair attacks upon individuals. Class spirit is an 
excellent thing but it m.ust be kept within bounds. 



We cannot help being surprised at the lack of inter- 
est which seems to exist among the majority of stu- 
dents with regards to college publications. Many 
appear to think their part done when they have paid 
their subscription to the college paper or the assess- 
ment of their class for the support of the Index. Now 
while we agree that paying these dues is a duty that 



38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



should be conscientiously attended to we hold that the 
payment of one dollar subscription for the paper or of 
ten dollars or more for the Index does not cover the 
whole of a man's indebtedness to these publications. 
The objects of college publications is not only to keep 
students and alumni informed upon college topics but 
also to encourage progress along any line, to furnish a 
stimulus to students who possess inert literary ability 
and to bring out ideas of interest to the student world. 
A college paper that fails in any one of these points 
does not repay its supporters for the time and money 
expended in its publication. A college paper is the 
voice of the student and as such should be made use 
of by the thinking element in college. If it embodies 
only the-ideas of the few students who constitute it's 
board of editors it cannot hope to be of any great in- 
terest to its readers. 



The recent successes of our football team show us 
what we are capable of when well trained and well 
managed. We have at last awakened an interest in 
athletics that shoutd enable us to do our best possible 
work upon the gridiron. Our second eleven have 
come out and sacrificed self interest, to a certain ex- 
tent, for the welfare of the team and we feel that to 
them is due a certain amount of praise. We still 
have several important games and we can hope to 
win them only by continuing our hard training. Our 
game with Springfield Training School although far 
from being an exhibition of good football, was cer- 
tainly good practice in piling up a score. We can 
compliment the Springfield team upon the fairness of 
the game which they played. Our schedule this year 
has been an excellent one and we should have no dif- 
ficulty next year in duplicating it. Heretofore we 
have not held our rightful position in athletics with 
respect to other colleges and now that we have suc- 
ceeded in getting in a class wtth our equals, we should 
by all means stay there. Being a college of small 
numbers we labor under a serious disadvantage but 
the successes of other small colleges have clearly 
demonstrated that although lack of numbers is a de- 
cided drawback, it is not an unsurmountable obstacle 
in the achievement of athletic honors. 



You never hear the bee complain, 
Nor hear it weep or wail, 

But if it wish, it can unfold 
A very painful tale. 



-Ex. 



INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT HADLEY 
AT YALE. 

Wednesday Oct. 18 was a memorable day at Yale. 
Battell Chapel was crowded from threshold to gallery. 
As the orchestra rendered the Prelude to Attialia the 
ladies, already assembled in the side galleries, looked 
down upon the procession, which having passed through 
crowds upon the Campus moved up the centre aisle 
and soon filled every seat. On the platform were one 
hundred of the most distinguished men of letters, 
holding high positions in colleges and universities and 
in state and national government, conspicuous among 
whom were the Governor of Connecticut with his 
staff. Admiral Bunce, Senators Depew, Hawley and 
Wetmore, Presidents Eliot, Schurman, Patten, Low. 
Harper, Seelye, Harris. Faunce, On the floor were 
representatives of institutions of learning from all 
parts of our land and not a few from other countries. 
Many wore academic gowns and caps. It was notic- 
able that President Eliot wore a blue hood signifying 
that he had received his Doctor's degree from Yale, 
and President Hadley wore a scarlet hood showing 
that Harvard gave his degree. 

To the tune of York the congregation sang the 
same Psalm that was sung at the opening of the first 
college erected in New Haven in 1718, Rev. J. H. 
Twichell, Senior Fellow of the University, conducted 
Dr. Hadley into the office of President putting in his 
hands the charter and seal and laying upon him the 
responsidility of conserving and developing Yale's 
endowment of power. Then a chorus of a hundred 
students sang Stedman's Ode to Yale, set to music 
by Prof. Parker, accompanied by the orchestra : the 
music moving and inspiring. At its close Professor 
Fisher delivered the address of congratulation in 
behalf of the several faculties of the university, 
pledging their hearty co-operation. 

When President Hadley arose he was greeted 
with tremendous applause. His address was listened 
to with intense interest and confirmed the opinion of 
all that Yale has been intrusted to the leadership of a 
man who has the confidence of all sons of Yale, 
young and old, conservative and radical, and also the 
respect and sympathy of educators throughout the 
country. He gave promise that he would be progres- 
sive while clinging to the good already secured. He 
is in sympathy with athletics freed from professionalism, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



39 



with sound learning both classical and scientific, with 
the spirit of democracy and above all with the spirit 
of true Christianity. 

Only a few of the students could gain admission to 
the Chapel. So the Campus and the town were given 
over to them for the rest of the day and night. The 
college buildings were illuminated, From the lofty 
towers of Vanderbilt dormitory and the Phelps Gate- 
way red fire blazed. Around the sides of the inner 
rectangle great torches were burning. Between the 
buildings Chinese lanterns were grouped so as to make 
the letters Y and H and to spell Yale. The old oak 
tree was brilliant with red lights from lowest to top- 
most branch. At nine o'clock the procession of 2500 
or 3000 students, bearing torches, issued from the 
Campus and marched through the streets of the the 
city which were crowded from curbstone to balcony 
with townspeople. The Academic department escorted 
by a platoon of police led the way. Then followed 
the Sheffield Scientific, the Law, the Medical, the 
Art, the Divinity, the Graduate Schools : then the 
body of the younger alumni. Each man carried a 
torch and wore a cap and gown of the color desig- 
nating the department to which he belonged. Numer- 
ous transparencies attracted attention. There was the 
old Saybrook meeting house where Yale was origi- 
nated. The Sheffield students carried a large blast 
furnace from whose chimney flames burst five feet 
high at frequent intervals. But the best of all was a 
locomotive and a train of three cars, fourteen feet 
long and seven high, propelled by " sweeps " con- 
cealed within. On the cars was painted " Hadley R. 
R. Transportation Co.," '-A new train of thought," 
" Hadley is on the right track." The faces of well 
known men were seen in the windows. Flame 
issued from the engine and when the bell rang the 
engineer had the undisputed right of way. 

The procession halted at City Hall, at the house of 
Judge Townsend and at the residence of President 
Hadley where speeches were made by the Mayor, by 
Senator Chauncey Depew, an enthusiastic Yale man, 
by President Hadley, President Eliot and many 
others. 

Returning to the Campus, the procession formed in 
a hollow square in the centre of which burned a huge 
bonfire whose flames blazed up above the tops of the 
surrounding buildings. 



One sharing in the festivities of the day could not 
but thank God and take courage. The loyalty to God, 
to country and to Alma Mater, the fraternity displayed 
not only between the different classes and different 
departments of the great university but also between 
the numerous colleges and schools of America, the 
unity shown to exist among the leaders of the state 
and church, among all men of letters of whatever 
school of thought, among all citizens learned and 
unlearned, and most of all the enthusiasm kindled in 
the hearts of the people of all ages and classes, rich 
and poor, assure the thoughtful man that whatever 
may be the dangers of this closing century the open- 
ing of the twentieth century gives good promise of the 
triumph of Democracy and the redemption of 
mankind. 

C. S. W. 



A SUGGESTION. 



The Library of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege now contans nearly 20,000 volumes. It may be 
regarded as one of the most valuable collections of 
agricultural and scientific books in this country. So 
extensive and complete is this collection in some 
respects, that it has a distinct value as an agricultu- 
ral research library. There are many books on the 
shelves that investigators in other colleges and experi- 
ment stations would esteem it a privilege to consult- 
To my personal knowledge. President Goodell has for 
years been gathering in numerous rare volumes, 
secured from second hand book stores in Europe and 
America, or other sources, some of which can only 
be found again by long continued search. 

This collection will grow more and more valuable 
with years, and no doubt when the contents of the 
library become more widely known, students from 
elsewhere will find it desirable to consult some of the 
rare works on the shelves, as not available elsewhere. 

The gathering together of a collection of books, 
is a simple thing, so far as numbers are concerned^ 
but it is not easy to find elsewhere many of the volumes 
in the M. A. C. library. Such a collection is only the 
result of the incessant effort of the bibliophile. 

This library, now worth many thousands of dollars, 
is established under the same roof as the College 
Chapel, which is of very limited accommodations, 



40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and though of a somewhat modern architecture, is 
not at all fireproof. The burning of this collection of 
books would be more than a local calamity — it would 
be national in its loss. Yet the loss of this library by 
fire is just as likely to happen as the burning of libra- 
ries of other colleges, which occurs from time to time. 
Such a thing is never expected, but now and then the 
unexpected happens in the destruction of a library 
building, as for example occured two or three years 
ago at the Iowa State University. 

For some time the thought has occurred to me 
that the Massachusetts Agricultural College library 
needs a new home, in which there shall be plenty of 
room for expansion, and where suitable protection 
from fire may be provided. There should be on the 
campus a beautiful stone library building, with the 
words " The Goodell Library " carved over the main 
entrance, for it would be eminently fitted to name this 
library after the man who has given such earnest 
thought and service to the gathering together of these 
books. 

The college should look to the state for money to 
provide this building at an early date, although it 
would be a fine thing if some man of means would 
make a gift ot such a building. It is possible that the 
Alumni might take an active interest in securing such 
a building, and there are men of large means to-day 
among the graduates, who could afford to contribute 
liberally to such a purpose as this. 

The main idea in this communication, is to direct 
the attention of some who might not otherwise think 
of it, to the value of the library, and to the necessity 
for a building in which it may be suitably housed, with 
the hope that in the end good may result from the 
suggeston. 

C. S. Plumb, '82. 



TO THE M. A. C. ALUMNI. 

It is proposed to change the time of the annual fra- 
ternity banquets from Monday evening of Commence- 
ment week to some date about the middle of January. 

The reasons therefor are as follows : 

1st. Monday evening at Commencement could then be de- 
voted to a large College banquet like that held in 1897, 
at which every M. A. C. man could participate. The 
College would then have an annual enthusiastic gath- 



ering corresponding to the local banquets of other 
colleges. 

2nd. Unless the time of the fraternity banquets is changed 
from Commencement week there is no opportunity 
for the general banquet; Tuesday nij^ht, the only 
other possible time being occupied by the Commence- 
ment ball. 

3rd. By mutual agreement all the fraternities have deferred 
their initiations from September to a date in January 
and it is suggested that the annual fraternity banquets 
be held in connection therewith so that both initiations 
and banquets would occupy more conspicuous posi- 
tions, be more enjoyable and of more general interest 
than at present. 

4th. These initiations and banquets could be made a nucleus 
for a variety of attractions and festivities at the Col- 
lege, in the dead of winter and serve at once as an 
inspiration to the student life at the College, an occa- 
sion for the renewal of friendships and the making of 
others, to enable former students to view the College 
in its working condition, and, above all, to call the 
attention of the public to the College and its mission 
at a most favorable time of year, i. e., to advertise the 
College. 

This proposition having recently been presented to 
a joint meeting of the committees indicated below, it 
was agreed to ask, for the opinion of each alumnus, 
on the question, with a view to a possible recommen- 
dation of the change indicated. 

Printed copies of the foregoing are to be sent to 
each alumnus together with a blank to be filled out 
and returned. If through any mistake blanks are 
not sent to all alumni, those not receiving them are 
requested to send their opinions on the matter to 
Prof. J. B, Paige. 

C. Wellington, '73, 
F. H. Brown, 1900, 
M. B. Landers, 1900, 

For D. G. K. 
J B. Paige. '82, 

F. G. Stanley, 1900, The 

J. H. Todd, 1901, 

For Q. T. V. I c- . u 

B. K. Jones, -96, \ Fraternity 

A. C. MONAHAN, 1900, 

Clarence E. Gordon, 1901, Conference. 

For College Shakespearean Club. 
F. S. CooLEY, '88, 
A. W. Morrill, 1900, 
A. C. Wilson, 1901, 

For Phi Sigma Kappa. 



C. Wellington, '73, 
J. Paige, '82. 
Edw. B. Holland, '92, 
S. F. Howard, '94. 
Ralph E. Smith, '94, 



Executive 
Committee 

of the 
Associate 
Alumni. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



41 



Springfield Training School, ; M. A. C, 34. 

The first home game of the season occurred on 
Wednesday and gave the students and everyone that 
was there, a good idea as to the faults and merits of 
the team. If the team had many faults, it did not 
show them and its merits were easily seen. 

Without an exception every man on the team strove 
to do his utmost and the work of Captain Halligan, 
Stanley, Cook and O'hearn is to be commented. 
After a minute's play from the kick-off O'hearn ran 
forty-five yards for a touchdown. This was closely fol- 
lowed by Snell's eighty-five yard run for the second. 
During the next few minutes by repeated gains through 
Springfield's line for ten or twenty yards by Gamwell, 
Bodfish, Cook and in fact everyone who was sent with 
the ball, another touchdown was credited to " Aggie." 
Here the team let up somewhat, scoring no more dur- 
ing the first half. At the commencing of the second 
half the excitement became intense as Springfield 
made a desperate attempt to score. Through one or 
two fumbles made by our men and Springfield's good 
team work, they got to within two feet of our goal. 
At the instant the ball was in play, Stanley tore through 
their line like a maddened bull and in some way 
unknown only to him, he got the ball and carried it 
back ten yards from the goal line and we were safe. 
That was the only chance Springfield had to score as 
our goal was never afterwards threatened. 

Our score would have been larger had not Dane and 
Crowell done some fine tackling and Henchle some 
good punting for Springfield. A large delegation came 
over from Springfield to see the game. One feature 
of the game was that neither side " broke away from 
clean ball " to use the expression of a Springfield 
enthusiast. 

The line up was as follows : — 
Spkingfield. M. a. C. 

Dane, r. e. 1. e., O'Hearn 

Boardman, r. t. 1. t., Stanley 

Af fleet, r. g. 1. g., Snell 

James, c. c, Paul 

Booth, 1. t. r. g., Gamwell 

Cornell, 1. g. r. t., Cook 

Hunter, 1. e. r, e., Bodfish 

Maylot, q. b., q. b,, C^nto, Whitman 



Cross, r. h. b. 1. h. b., Pierson 

Henchel, 1. h. b. r. h. b., Barry 

Fish (Capt.), f. b. f. b., (Capt.) Halligan 

Tonchdowns — O'Hearn 2, Halligan 2, Stanley, Snell. 
Goals — Barry 4. Umpire — G. F. Parmenter '00. Referee — 
F. N. Seerley. M. D., of Springfield. Linesmen — C. Leslie 
and Chesly. Time — 25 minute halves. 

Trinity, 16 ; M. A. C, 5. 

Trinity defeated our team, Saturday, Oct. 21st on 
the Hartford gridiron in a stubbornly contested battle. 
It was during the first half that we scored, Captain 
Halligan kicking one of his " never-fail " drops from 
about the twenty-five yard line. 

Our lead in the first half enlivened the Trinity boys 
to scoring in the second and although Trinity was 
leading by eleven points, it was not her game until the 
whistle blew, for her goal was in constant danger. 

Line up was as follows : — • 
Trinity. M. A. C. 

Hudson, 1. e. r. e., Bodfish 

Trumball, D. Browns, 1. 1. r. t.. Cook 

Crone, 1. g. r. g., Gamwell 

Stone, c. c,, Paul 

Henderson, r. g. 1. g., Snell 

W. Brown, r. t. 1. e., Rogers 

Clement. McKeon, r. e. q. b.. Canto 

P. Browne, q. b. h. b.. O'Hearn 

Syphax, h. b. h. 1., Barry 

Luke, h. b. f. 1., (Capt.) Halligan 

Bimley, f, b. 

U. v., 6; M. A. C, 11. 

On Saturday last, the home team defeated the 
University af Vermont team at Burlington, in a well 
contested game, by a score of 11 to 6. Our team 
excelled in interference but in other respects the 
teams were well matched. 

Although the whole team did good work the work 
of Captain Halligan and Stanley was excellent. The 
team was strengthened by the return of Chickering 
who was laid up some time passed on account of an 
injury received during practice. 

For the Green Mountain boys, Joiner and Hutchin- 
son excelled. The summary : 

Vermont. Aggie. 

Morse, r. e. 1- e-> O'hearn 

Dow, r. t. 1- 1- Stanley 

McKellow, r. g. 1. g., Snell 

Berkley, c. • " c.. Paul 

Wadnell, L g. r. g., Gamwell 



42 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Putnam, ( , , 
Cooke, I 
Strait, 1. e. 

Joiner, q. b. 

j r. h. b. 
1. h. b. 

■f. b. 



r. t., Cooke 

r. e , Bodfish 
, I Whitman 

q- b-. \ ronton 



Canton 
1. h. b., Chickering 

r. h. b., Barry 

f. b., Halligan 



Holm, 

Hutchinson 

Lee. 

Butler, 

Locke, 

Oatley, 

Score — Aggie 11, Vermont 6. Touchdowns — Halligan 2, 
Lee. Goals from touchdowns — Barry, Lee. Time — 20 
minute halves. 

NOTES. 

Shell out I Come out 1 

Team is doing better ! First down ! 

Keep tt up ! A good goal to try for. 

The scrub teams that line up against the varsity are 
helping to win every game. 

The '02 and '03 teams want to come out now 
and practice against the college eleven. 

To-day we play Amherst, Saturday we run up 
against Worcester Tech. and the following Wednes- 
day we Williston. 

On Monday morning the team received a royal 
welcome home being carried on the shoulders of the 
students all around the campus while the bells rang 
out in peals of welcome and the college yells were 
given. They deserved it. 



TWO TRAMPS. 

^ [Concluded.] 

For some time my friend and I walked aimlessly 
along. In spite of our adventure with the farmer and 
our uncertainty about the future we were quite enthu- 
siastic over our plan. The thought that for once we 
were our own masters and were free to go wherever 
we liked was positively exhilarating, and we completely 
forgot our surroundings. By and by, however, we 
noticed that it was getting dark. We remembered 
then that we must use our wits in order to get any 
shelter for the night. The long walk in our wet 
clothes was beginning to tell on us, and we were also 
ravenously hungry. To make things still more 
uncomfortable, no house or building of any kind was 
in sight, and the clouds overhead looked very threat- 
ening. Evidently we would have to do something 
immediately. 



Feeling disgusted enough at our carelessness in 
getting into such a deserted place we hurried along as 
fast as we could and spied a single farm-house just as 
a few drops of rain began to fall. Quickening our 
pace we rushed into the yard. The door of the big 
barn was open and obeying a natural impulse we both 
ran in as the rain came pouring down. 

" No, you don't. You don't belong here. This 
aint no place for ' bums.' Come, clear out lively! " 

The words, mingled with a liberal supply of curses 
came from the loft above. Looking up we saw stand- 
ing on the mow a stalwart old man fiercely brandish- 
ing a pitchfork in our direction. One look was enough. 
We " stayed not upon the order of our going" but 
bolted out into the rain at full speed, followed by a 
second stream of invective from the farmer. We 
spied a hen-house near by and set off for it but the 
farmer followed, intending to drive us out if we went 
in. So we went away in search of a more friendly 
locality, getting wet through a second time of course 
before we had gone ten yards. We were fast learning 
by bitter experience some of the hardships and dis- 
comforts which a tramp meets with many times a day 
as a matter of course. To us, the case seemed hope- 
less enough — no money, no supper, no shelter, no 
friends. We had become outcasts, for whom no one 
cared. 

What was to be done ? Something, for we could 
not starve on the first day out. 'We considered vari- 
ous wild schemes but rejected them all. We passed 
several farms, but to our requests the answer was 
invariably a curt refusal. But just as we were getting 
com.pletely discouraged we reached a house where 
permission was granted us to sleep in the barn. We 
were also given our supper and breakfast on condition 
that we work the next forenoon picking up stones. A 
week before we would have laughed at such an offer. 
Now we were delighted with it. The farmer, whose 
name was Kenson, took us into the kitchen and gave 
us some bread and milk, watching us sharply while we 
ate, to see that we made off with none of the furniture 
and dishes, I suppose. In fact, he told us that he fed 
a tramp once who rewarded him by stealing his shoes. 
We amused ourselves by asking him many questions 
about the country and its people, little thinking that 
later we would find ourselves in serious trouble on this 
account. The next morning we picked up stone as 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



we had agreed to do and while the rough edges bruised 
our hands, we worlced with a will and the farmer was 
much pleased with us. 

After dinner we left him and went on our way. We 
spent that night in a deserted house and begged our 
food as we went along. The next day we were going 
through a small village when we found ourselves sur- 
rounded by several men who brought us to a standstill. 
We indignantly demanded an explanation, and one of 
the group produced a warrant for our arrest on the 
charge of robbing the post-office in the town we had 
just passed through. Our efforts to convince them of 
our innocence were unavailing. They said they had 
seen us hanging around a number of days before the 
robbery, while no other suspicious characters had been 
near for weeks. Hence we must have been the rob- 
bers and were now trying to get away. One man 
declared that we looked like professional burglars any- 
way ; you didn't see tramps with well-shaved faces 
and soft hands ; most likely we had just escaped from 
jail. At this point our late host, Mr. Kenson, drove 
up and added the most conclusive evidence of all, to 
the effect that we had been at his house two nights 
before and had asked him many questions about the 
post-office, as indeed, we certainly had. Things began 
to look serious. We realized that circumstances were 
against us and nothing we could say would be believed. 
The crowd set off with us toward the " lock-up" and 
our spirits fell lower and lower at each step. We had 
not gone far though when a man dashed up on horse- 
back yelling at the top of his voice " We've got 'em I 
We've got 'em ! " Everybody crowded around him 
asking him who he meant. 

" Why, the burglars, of course. We found them 
over by the station, They had all the stamps and 
money with them, and owned up that they did it." 

Thus we were free again. The crowd soon dis- 
persed, but Mr. Kenson lingered a moment. "Some- 
how, I don't believe you fellows are straight tramps," 
he said, " You haven't been so long anyway. Seems 
as if I had seen you in different clothes from them. 
Wall, I could make it some hot for you now by having 
you pulled for vagrancy, but seeing as I've sort of got 
you into this scrape, I feel as if I ought to help you 
out a little. Come now, who are you ?" 

There was no evading his blunt searching questions. 
Moreover, we were sick of the whole bvi?in§§S, 3,n4 



we told him the truth. He heard us attentively and 
then said : 

"Wall, I might have known it was some fool college 
chaps, anybody else would have more sense. 1 guess 
you've had jour lesson through. Now see here. 
You'd better give the plan up right straight off or 
you'll get into some scrape you won't get out of so 
easy. I tell you what I'll do. I don't need any help 
myself, but I know a man who will hire you for the 
summer. It'll be change enough from your books and 
when fall comes you can leave a week or so early and 
have a good time. Come, what do you say ?" 

We hesitated. We hated to admit defeat, and we 
were not very enthusiastic about working all summer. 
Still our commonsense told us he was right and finally 
we agreed. He took us home, gave us new clothes 
and the next day went with us to the man he had 
spoken of. Judge of our surprise when we found it 
was the farmer whose dog we had stoned on our first 
day out. A few explanations set everything right, and 
we stayed at his farm most of the summer. It was 
hard work and not at all romantic but we got along first- 
rate and returned to college and strong more healthy 
than ever. Ned, the eldest son, went back with us, 
and his brother came a -year later. During our stay, 
1 succeeded in making friends with the poor dog, while 
my companion was even more successful with the farm- 
er's daughter. Altogether, we made up a " Happy Fam- 
ily," and my friend and I were sorry when the vacation 
was over. And so ends the story of the " Rise, 
Decline, and Fall " of " Two Tramps." 



Imprfs|i©ri| of an idler. 



It has been wafted about college, through the fac- 
ulty and back again that the "good old custom" aban- 
doned long ago by our predecessors, has been revived 
again. It is living again in the same old way, and it 
is just as much a menace now as it ever was before. 
You all know what the Idler refers to. It is the custom 
of room stacking. The bad blood between the two 
lower classes must be given a vent but let it show 
itself in good fair fights, or better, in the regular 
class events. It is no doubt a very funny thing to go 
to your room and find the furniture piled in a heap, 
your pictures spoiled, your papers lost, your room in a 
state fit only for cyclone regions, but each and every 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



one of us would get amusement enough without any 
help in this direction. 

One of the mottoes of the Idler is, " Never help 
any one, make everyone help you." He lives up to 
this, and consequently has an easy thing with life. 
As a rule things come his way so that he not only 
does no work but everyone contributes to his welfare. 
The other day a story was brought to him that woke 
him from his lethargy and stirred him to active life. 
It was the report that all the Freshmen had sworn 
upon their honor that they knew nothing of the stack- 
ing done in the Sophomore rooms. The Idler saw at 
once that they had perjured themselves, and he at 
once began to hunt for extenuating circumstances. 
He could find none. There was a clear breach of 
honor. The stacking had been done, probably with 
the consent of the class but they had disclaimed all 
knowledge of the act. The Idler proposed severe 
measures but the youth of the offenders was advanced 
as an excuse. In his mind it is no excuse. Every 
man is brought up with principles of honor, and when 
he fails a man and tells him a direct lie, he is not 
only dishonoring himself but he is offering the worst 
kind of an Insult to the deceived. 

It seems to the Idler that there is a lack of interest 
in the Life, not only do the students fail to contribute 
but the editors do their work in a listless sort of way, 
influenced, no doubt by the lack of interest on the 
part of the students. The business manager has to 
wail and weep, for the cash subscription. If the col- 
lege intends to support the paper, it must in the mind 
of the Idler, give a bit of its energy to it, the student 
must try and feel the exhilaration in the first accepted 
manuscript. 



Plans are being considered for the placing of a 
running track in the Drill Hall. This will enable all 
those who desire, to keep in training all winter. We 
also understand that the heating apparatus is to be 
thoroughly renovated. If these plans are to be car- 
ried out it will necessitate a tax of some kind upon 
the student body. We feel that having a place where 
exercise can be taken in winter would be a benefit to 
every man in college and that every man should come 
forward and show his willingness to support the idea. 
Just what indoor training or the lack of it means to us 
we can appreciate better next spring than we can now. 



Colle;^^ IMot^S- 



— Amherst to-day. 

— Worcester Tech. next. 

— Then comes Williston. 

— S. E. Smith, '99, spent a few days at College 
last week. 

— Condition examinations in Mathematics , were 
held last Friday. 

— A number of the boys enjoyed a social dance in 
the drill hall on Halloween. 

— The dancing class is being organized, and the 
first lesson will be given soon. 

— The meeting of the College which had been 
arranged by the Fraternity conference committee to 
take place on Oct. 21 has been postponed until Sat- 
urday evening, November 4. 

— The 1902 Index Board has been elected and 
consists of the following men : Editor-in-chief, L. C. 
Claflin ; business manager, J. C. Hall ; ass't business 
manager, R. W. Morse; artist, D. N, West; associ- 
ate editors. H. A, Paul, W. Z. Chase, H. L. Knight 
and A. L. Dacy. 

— The College Shakespearean Club has purchased, 
as a site for their Fraternity house, the northwest cor- 
ner lot of the property of Mrs, Louisa Baker. The 
lot lies next to the College land and faces the triangle 
between the old road and the county road. It is 
bounded on two sides by the county road and the Col- 
lege road which leads to the summit of Mt. Pleasant. 

— Four electric lights have been placed along the 
College road from the Chapel to the county road. 
Three lights are being placed between North College 
and the Boarding-club house. These new lights and 
the new sidev/alk will be highly- appreciated by the 
boys ; especially by those who have paddled through 
the mud across the ravine in the dark so many times 
during the past winters. 

— The first number of the Union Lecture course 
was a concert by the Ladies Military Band of Boston 
and was given on Wednesday, Oct. 24. The next 
number will be a lecture by William Webster Ells- 
worth of 77?^ Century Company, New York. His sub- 
ject will be " Arnold and Andre." The date for the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



45 



lecture by Rev. Russell H. Cornell has been changed 
to Wednesday evening December 6. 

— The football game scheduled withWorcesterTech. 
on Nov. 4 will be played in Amherst instead of at 
Worcester and the second game with the same team 
will be played at Worcester on November 11. The 
schedule for the remainder of the season is as fol- 
lows : To-day our team plays Amherst College on the 
Pratt Field ; Nov. 4, Worcester Tech. at Amherst; 
Nov. 8, Williston at Amherst; Nov. 11, Worcester 
Tech. at Worcester. 

— The Freshman Football team defeated the 
Northampton Y. M. C. A. on Wednesday, October 18 
by a score of 23-0. The Freshman team worked 
well and played hard. The feature of the game was 
the playing of Capt. O'Hearn and Snell. The Y. M. 
C. A. team were heavy but had had little practice. It 
was their first game and the men were new to each 
other and new to their positions although none of the 
players were new to the game. 

• — The Sunderland foot-ball team suffered a defeat 
at the hands of the Sophomore class team on Satur- 
day, October 21. The score was 5-0. The feat- 
ures of this game were the loose playing on both sides 
and the constant fumbling. Both goals were in con- 
tinual danger. The Sophomores would take the ball 
within the ten yard line of the Sunderland goal and 
lose It on downs. The Sunderlands would threaten 
the Sophomore goal and they in turn would lose on 
downs or fumbles. There was no score at the end of 
the first half. The Sophomores kicked off the second 
half. Chasing kicking the ball over the Sunderland 
goal line. Sunderland seemed unconcerned and 
allowed McCobb to fall upon the ball thus scoring a 
touchdown. 

— The Annual Sophomore Freshman rope-pull took 
place upon the campus Friday afternoon October 20, 
the Sophomores gaining an easy victory with a margin 
of nine and one- half feet of rope. The victory was 
due entirely to the team work of the Sophomores, 
Their men were unusually light but they took great 
care on the drop to secure a good position and good 
foot holds. The Freshmen were nervous as shown by 
the fact that they dropped twice before the word was 
given. They gained rope on the drop but while 
attempting to gain more by pulling at once, they 



neglected to work their heels into the ground and con- 
sequently were unable to hold the rope at all when the 
Sophomores commenced their regular systematic 
heaving. The Sophomores continued to heave for at 
least a minute, after which they laid on their rope but 
the Freshman made no attempt to regain what they 
had lost. The teams were made up as follows: 
Sophomore— H. A. Paul, Capt., H. L. Bodfish, E. F. 
McCobb, J. H. Belden, C. E. Dwyer, W. Z. Chase, 
anchor. Freshman — C. A. Tinker, Capt., G. L. Bar- 
rus, H. T. Kelley, H. M. Cheever, W. T. Hood, E. 
B. Snell, anchor, 

^^The executive committee of the Alumni Associa- 
tion and the Fraternity Conference committee held a 
joint meeting on Monday, Oct. 23. An important 
discussion was held in regard to the advisability of 
changing the date for the annual fraternity banquets 
and reunions from Monday night of Commencement 
week to some date during the winter term, thus leav- 
ing Monday night free for an alumni banquet and 
Tuesday night free for the Commencement prome- 
nade. In the past the alumni banquet and the prom- 
enade have conflicted and one has been obliged to 
make place for the other. It was proposed that the 
fraternity reunions might take place upon the same 
night as the fraternity initiations which have neces- 
sarily been postponed, on account of the agreement 
between the fraternities, until early in the winter term. 
It is thought that these two together might be made a 
nucleus for a few days of-social and festive mid-win- 
ter entertainments among v/hich might be speaking, 
lectures, an athletic meet and a basket ball game in 
the gymnasium, the Glee club concert and the midwin- 
ter promenade. The plan was looked upon so favor- 
ably by the joint committee that it was determined to 
ascertain the opinions of the alumni on the question 
as it is a matter which concerns the alumni more 
perhaps than it does the undergraduates. Accord- 
ingly a statement, setting forth the facts of the case, 
has been prepared and mailed to each alumnus of the 
College. Enclosed with the statement is a blank to 
be filled out and returned to the committee which will 
express the opinion of the signer, whether he regards 
the plan favorably or unfavorably. As soon as these 
answers are received the committee will take definite 
action. 



46 



AGGIE LIFE. 



September 18, 1899 at a meeting of the faculty it 
it was voted that it be left to the discretion of each 
instructor whether or not, in the subjects taught by 
him, students attaining a term mark of 85 shall be 
excused from examination. 

October 25, 1899 at a meeting of the faculty it 
was voted that the Registrar be instructed to enter 
upon the record the mark reported for each student's 
term mark. As soon as a condition is passed off this 
fact shall be reported to the Registrar who shall 
indicate the same on the record. 

That a student whose term mark in any subject is 
less than 55 per cent shall be debarred from the term 
examination. 

That a student whose examinations mark in any 
subject is less than 55 per cent shall be conditioned 
in that subject. 

C. S. Walker, Secretary. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Outlines of Industrial Chemistry, by F. H. Thorpe, 
Ph. D., of Mass. Insti. Tech. This is an elementary 
text book for students in technical schools and col- 
leges. The author describes the most important 
industrial chemical processes of both organic and inor- 
ganic industries. The preparation of products from 
raw materials through the agency of chemical change 
is what an industrial chemistry primarily deals with. 
A few industries however which depend for the most 
part on mechanical changes must necessarily be in- 
cluded for reason of the difficulty in drawing a sharp 
line between chemical and mechanical technology. 
Although the book does not go into the minute de- 
tails of every process it is sufficiently complete for 
the ordinary student who wishes to obtain a general 
knowledge of the subject. 

Strong Hearts is the title of George W. Cable's 
latest work of fiction but we must admit that it is a 
trifle difficult to discern the exact relation between 
strong hearts and the book's contents. It consists of 
three stories which are not strictly speaking " affaires 
du coeur " as one might be led to suppose. The 
stories however are very entertaining although they 
are what is called light reading. The first one 
entitled " The Solitary" is a verypleasing little narra- 
tive, the scene being in Louisiana. The first is the 
best of the three stories but the other two are also 



well worth reading. As a whole the book is well writ- 
ten, the characters well drawn and the conclusions 
very appropriate. 

The Microscopy of Drinking Water, by G. C. Whipple 
biologist of department of water supply, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. This book is intended to serve as a guide to the 
water-analyst and the water-works engineer and also 
to stimulate a greater interest in the study of micro- 
scopic aquatic life and general limnology. The 
author makes no pretense of covering the entire sub- 
ject but the work is believed to be complete enough to 
enable the general reader to obtain a true conception 
of the nature and practical importance of microscopic 
life in drinking water. Part I deals with the subject 
from a practical and economic stand point. The 
methods and objects of microscopic examination, 
sources and distribution of organisms are the principle 
topics discussed. Part II contains a classification of 
microscopic organisms with illustrations of the most 
important forms. 

Rontgen Rays edited by George F. Barker, Harpers 
Scientific Memoirs No. III. This book consists of 
memoirs by such authorities on the subject as Ront- 
gen, Stokes and Thompson. There is much satisfac- 
tion is getting information of any kind at first hand. 
The first part of this book is " On the New Kind of 
Rays " by Prof. Rontgen — a verbal translation from 
the German. It is very interesting to note the man- 
ner of discovery and follow along with the investiga- 
tions of the discoverer. The subject of these investi- 
gations were in part : photographic action, magnetic 
deflection, interference, point of emission, optical 
effect and polarization. The memoir by Stokes is on 
the " Nature of Rontgen Rays" and deals mostly with 
theories concerning them and discussions of their 
properties. The last memoir consists of a few pages 
on the theory of connection- between Cathode and 
Rontgen Rays. 

The Soluble Ferments and Fermentation, by Prof. J. 
Reynolds Green of Trinity College. Cambridge, Eng- 
land. The various problems of fermentation have 
received considerable attention from scientists during 
the past decade. The study of the ferments is of 
great practical importance for there is hardly any 
aspect of animal or vegetable life in which they do 
not play some part. In this book the author has 
sought to bring together so far as possible the results 



AGGIE LIFE. 



47 



already reached and to indicate the conclusions con- 
cerning the processes of fernnentation to which these 
results lead. After a discussion on the nature of fer- 
mentation and its relation to enzymes is a detailed 
account of diastose, inulose, cytase, sugar splitting 
enzymes, ammoniacal fermentation, oxidases, alco- 
holic fermentation and the fermentative power of 
protoplasm. The work closes with chapters on the 
secretion, constitution and mode of action of enzymes. 
The treatment of these topics includes a discussion of 
the discovery, occurrence, preparation and behavior 
of enzymes in both animal and plant bodies. The 
chapters on the history of the subject are of consid- 
erable interest. The book is remarkably valuable to 
physiologists as a compact but full summary of the 
researches, accompanied as it is by an extensive 
bibliography leading to further details in the original 
papers. 



SUNSET. 

The western sky was yet aglow, 
Lit with the last faint beam 

That peeped above Mt. Warner's crest, 
A tiny golden stream. 

This little beam that lit the sky. 

Into my darkened heart. 
Sent rays of hope that quickly bid 

Despondency depart. 

Wrapt in a spell, I watched the scene. 

More radiant it grew 
The mountain seemed a molten hill 

Hiding a sky of blue. 

I know not why I turned my head. 
But, looking back once more, 

I only saw the sombre hill, 
Blacker than e'er before. 

The sun no longer shines for me. 
All nature's beauties shorn, 

I go to my sequestered cot 
And wait the glorious morn. 



C^cKd^n^es- 



A later number of The Tech is on our table. In an 
editorial we notice that The Tech is not supported by 
the alumni as it should be. What is the reason for 
this lethargy on the part of alumni everywhere, — I 
will not say everywhere — but in so many places ? If 
every alumnus would decide upon some particular 



work in college that he could help along when he be- 
came independently fixed in life what a blessing it 
would be. This is a duty which everyone should bear 
in mind. Money is not always the necessary essen- 
tial, but above all loyalty and affection are to be desired. 

The Clarion of the Roxbury High school contains a 
very graphic account of a " Bloody Monday " rush at 
Harvard. The article is apparently the contribution 
of some Harvard student and is very interesting. 
Especially will be interesting to Aggie students. 

Read the yarn in the High school Argus entitled 
" Faculty versus Students." It's good. It's a well- 
written piece, too. 

We have just received the September number of 
The Latin and High School Review. We notice in an 
editorial that the paper is just about to enter upon the 
fourteenth year of its existence. We congratulate 
the paper that it has enjoyed so long a life and that it 
is now so prosperous. It seem to be a paper of a 
high literary character. I surmise that the paper 
owes its literary completeness and general excellence 
to the fact that it has a large corps of editors. It 
seems to be fact, illustrated by this paper, that the 
contributors to the columns of a college journal are 
generally members of the editorial board. Outsiders, 
unless struggling for a place on the board, are not 
very apt to send in articles, therefore, the larger the 
corps of editors the less burdensome is each editor's 
duty and the better is the paper. 

Our students will be interested in the following bit 
of information taken from the Amherst Student: 
" Adjusters, representing the various companies in 
which the college property is insured, were in town 
last week and made a settlement on the recently 
burned grand stand to the amount of nearly $9000. 
Frederick Pratt, '87, with the characteristic readiness 
of his family to respond to Amherst's needs, desires 
that the work on a new grand stand be pushed with all 

possible haste Undoubtedly 

it will be completed before the spring athletic sea- 
son opens. . . . The apparatus destroyed 
in the fire has been mostly refurnished." 

The Chronicle is a first class monthly. We do not 
agree with it that 77?^ Latin and High School Review 
needs very much adverse criticism. 

Our western exchanges are interesting to us of the 



48 



AGGIE LIFE. 



east, The stories are tales, oftentimes, of western 
life, which being different in many particulars from 
that of the east gives a new and pleasant coloring to 
the stories. In spite of the reported barbarous char- 
acter of the " wild and wooly west " from which 
these papers come we are much pleased to find thsm 
of a highly civilized, creditable character. 

We have two papers on our table bearing the name 
High School Argus. One belongs to the Richmond 
High school, the other to the Harrisburg school. 
Could not one of these papers be prevailed upon to 
change its name, so that to use a current expression, 
each paper may get " all that's comin to it ?" 

The Tufionian for October has a well-written little 
story entitled " The Transplanting of Nancy Greg." 
The attention given to domestic details furnishes a 
clew to the sex of its author. In it we are given a 
very fine fireside picture. 



Alu 



mm. 



'71. — S. H. Richmond is editor of the Biscayne Bay 
the " Southermost monthly published in the Union ;" 
an interesting eight page paper representing the Bis- 
cayne Bay Region, in Florida. Address, Cutler, Dade 
County, Fla., (Perrine Grant). 

'79. — Dr. W. A. Sherman, has been quite seriously 
ill, but we are glad to say that he is now on the con- 
valescent list. Address, Lowell, Mass. 

Ex-'89. — Geo. A. Adams, is recuperating at his 
old home in Winchendon, Mass. 

'91. — A. G. Eames is planning to go to the Philip- 
pine Islands. 

'92. — Edward T. Clark, superintendent Wolf Penn 
Farm, Southborough, Mass. 

'94.- — -Lowell Manley, superintendent Weld Farm, 
West Roxbury, Mass. Weld Farm suffered a loss of 
about $12,000 from fire on Oct. 22. The buildings 
are in the form of three sides of a rectangle, with the 
dwelling house of the superintendent at one end of the 
open sides, and a large barn at the other. The fire 
started in the loft and worked rapidly along the line 
of buildings until they were a mass of flames. In 
the barn at the time of the discovery of the fire 
were 55 horses, 30 of which were in the part afire. 
They were all taken out without much trouble, 
however. 



'94. — A. H. Kirkland is Acting Director of Gypsy 
Moth Committee, Massachusetts State Board of 
Agriculture, 

'95. — R. S. Jones, 3 Cambridge Terrace, AJl- 
ston, Mass. 

'95. — A. F. Burgess has accepted a posttion as 
instructor in Entomology at the University of Illinois, 
Address, 936 West Illinois St., Urbana, 111. 

'96. — Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Burrington announce the 
birth of a son, Sunday, Oct. 15. 

'96.— F. E. De Luce, Manager Gardner Daily and 
Weekly News, Gardner, Mass. 

'97.^ — C. A. Peters, assistant, Kent Laboratory, 
Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 



TO THE DEAF. — A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



Suits to ortler from $13.00 up. Suits presscil 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember tliese suits ax^pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made ami altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trim used in tlie latest ttyle. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Ulass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand- 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO.. 

•34 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



AMHa$f , Aa$$. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fme Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door sotith of Post Office. 



niiuiiniEiiEiKiiiiiissuiiuuuniiiinaiUiiiiiEuiiiEiiiiiuiuiUiiaiiiuiiMUjj 



s Is your exercise making 7 To make the hard 
s and Gupple kind, rub down after every spell 
5 of exercising, with 



I It tones the nervous system, prevents and | 

S removes stiffness and soreness, and is the | 

a best remedy known for sprains. In use for g 

3 90 years. Sold in two size bottles— 25 cents = 

I and 50 cents. | 

I I. S. JOHNSON <& CO., Boston, JYIass. = 

nii:3:!IE3EE:EEIE!3BE]CEE3EESElIIEiEIIElElSEEEEEBEIBEIIEEilIIIiieEEEBiiiEESEEEEIBUII 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



mm TEFiGies' hsepies of mmi 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pittsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York, -Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are tliou- 
sands of positions to be filJ<Hl. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilitici^ for piacing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. I'rincipals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHIflGTOfJ, D. G., otf PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWN, D. D. s! 



ENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amhkrst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFriCE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATB FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
OfHce, Cook's Block, Amherst, Magg. 



AGGiE LIFK. 



Start in Basiness for Yoapself. 



SUCCESS ASSURED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. " 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



Lo^elly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Grottps, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. H. Tt?OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
Wm IN STOYES HND BQNGES. 

AGENT FOB THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 564. 



C. R. EILDEIR, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

jy AU suits made in my own work-shops. .^^J 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



fflassaehiisetts flgpieultoPal College. 

AT THE 

OOIaLEaiS FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 



And we beg te announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Pnper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE Town HALL. 
MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. B. DICKIN5DN, S. U. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

S TO IS A.. ls/£.^ l-SO TO S DP. ^VT- 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered Trhen desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



X FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

iKTJBBEIS C3-OOIDS- 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JtS'Sepairing done u.-hil» you tvait,.,Sff 
9 FITfENIX MOW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY m FEED STABLE 



T. Ii. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT amUET, AMMERST, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

, Gaps, Gloves. Gents' Furnishings, 

FINE READY-lflADE SUITS. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

«Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatii Establisliment. 



A-gsie A.s:«*^t? 



H. T-,. oje«a.j»e; 'OO 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SS^srS A.TISFA.0TI01<r a-XJA.Il.A-lSrTBEID, a>SS 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



rtriUgg'e Itlletic Oitfittiis.* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST Pfi/CES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



S4 and 86 Frcmklin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



^aeeacbusette 

Hgricultural 



OFFEIR: 



1. A SHOB.T WINTEK COITBSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOUS, YEAItS' OOUEiSi:, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thoroughfoundationfor further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST G-RADITATi: COUB.SE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For farther information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



j!:c*s»- r\^, 



■2»\ASS- 




/ 



U 




^"""r^ 

/x:.-^ 



,.>^^ 



r. 



V 




Oolleg:^* 



IL. X. 



NO. 5. 



CLOTH I NO FURN8SHINOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Mats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



A. B. CALL, 



273 ilain St., 



Society ^>^ Catering', 



I^^BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON.^^ 



GIVE US A CALL. 



An ejitirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos — all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes — all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AWIHERST HOUSE DflUG STORE. 



%m 






Winter Rttsset Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.50. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $^.00. 



:RE:RAIR!r\!0.^ 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



COILEIE 
JEWELEB 



JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

4®=-EYES FITTED FEEE^^jr 
By a graduate of Dr. Foster, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 



Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 15, 1899, 



NO. 5 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribut*. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be s«nt 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi-torlals. 



At the social gathering held in the Chapel upon 
Nov. 4 several points were brought out in connection 
with an athletic field. Everyone who has at heart 
the success of the college in athletics naust be deeply 
interested in the proposed field, and there are no 
doubt nnany of our alumni who are ready and willing 
to contribute liberally toward its establishment. With 
our superior equipment in all other branches we feel 
that our short comings in athletic equipment are 
becoming very noticeable. The tendency of the 
times is toward a higher physical development in the 
college graduate and in no way can this development 
be better obtained than by good honest training in 
outdoor athletics. 



In the Springfield Union, Nov. 2, was an account 
of our game with Amherst that was decidedly mis- 
leading to say the least. As we cannot conceive of 
any man whose observation and judgement of a foot- 
ball game is so poor as to lead him to write such an 



account conscienciously, we are forced to believe that 
the author of this account, in his zealousness for his 
college, knowingly deviated from what every one 
recognized as true. Now as a college reporter holds 
to a certain extent a position of trust, any departure 
from truth in his articles to a paper must work an 
injury to his college, to the paper, and incidently to 
himself. A biased article is certain to differ from 
accounts in other papers and this discrepancy will only 
help to attract more attention. In athletics as in 
every thing else a defeat by a worthy opponent carries 
with it no disgrace and credit should be given where 
it belongs. 



We wish to call attention to a matter of special 
importance which is connected with the reading 
rooms. A few much needed improvements are 
being completed and while this work is going on there 
is of necessity a little disorder among the magazines 
upon the tables. We should endeavor not to add to 
the disorder by carelessness in laying magazines where 
they do not belong. Another matter is talking aloud 



50 



AGGIE 



LIFE. 

\ ~ 

REVIEW OF THE FOOTBALL SEASON. 

The most successful football season which has ever 
fell to the lot of Aggie closed with the Williston game 
played on the campus on Wednesday last, November 
8. A total of ten games have been played, in seven 
of which our men were victorious. T^o games 
scheduled with the Worcester Tech were cancelled 
by them on account of the crippled condition of their 
team. What our success is due to can be easily 
seen. There has been an awakened interest in foot- 
ball during the past year as well as there has in other 
lines. The management of the team has been all 
that could be asked. A good schedule was arranged 
at the beginning of the season and the team has been 
equipped in very good manner. The season has been 
marked by perfect harmony among the players, hard 
regular practice and good systematic training with all 
the sacrifices necessarily accompanying it. The 
captain and manager have received the best of sup- 
port ; there has been an entire lack of Fraternity feel- 
ing which has often caused so much harm in the past and 
there has always been a scrub ready for practice when 
wanted. We are well satisfied with the result of the 
season. We have had great success and according 
to one of our big dailies " have surprised not only our- 
selves but the football world at large." 

The football season began on Sept. 1 1 , with a call 
for men to compete for positions on~ the team. 
Twenty men appeared upon the campus and imme- 
diately began practice in passing and tackling. On 
the second day Coach Murphy arrived and soon had 
the team ready to line up for defensive and offensive 
work. A scrub was called for and men promptly 
responded, organized and lined up before the 'varsity. 
Hard games were played every day and the team was 
worked into good shape so that when the time for the 
first game arrived we saw our men off for Worcester 
with a feeling of confidence that they would play well. 
The first game was with Holy Cross and was their 
first game as well as ours. Although both teams 
worked hard there was considerable fumbling and 
loose playing. Holy Cross scored twice during the 
first six minutes of play but our men discovered their 
weak point and taking a strong brace prevented their 
opponents from scoring again. One Worcester paper 
stated that Holy Cross defeated the Aggies but that 



while in the reading room. Most people come to the 
reading room to read and do not care to listen to con- 
versation or to be disturbed by those who are not read- 
ing. Those who talk or laugh in the reading-room do 
not deliberately intend to disturb people and they will 
generally desist when spoken to. But the Reading 
Room Association cannot afford to hire an attendant 
to keep order. Some of us are perhaps apt to be a 
little forgetful when answering a telephone call. A 
telephone is a public convenience and all conversation 
over it should be business like. People who call up 
students will not generally be able to appreciate 
facetiousness on the part of the person who answers 
the call. This laxity on our part is a small matter but 
we have only to look back a short time to see what it 
once lead.to. 



In presenting the foot ball team with college sweaters 
we show our appreciation of the work they have done 
this year. They have not only trained hard and been 
unusually victorious but wherever they have gone they 
have presented an appearance that reflected honor 
upon their college. They have always played a fair 
game and whether winners or losers they have been 
gentlemen throughout. In the game with Amherst 
our team showed the result of their continuous training. 
The outcome of this game has corrected many erro- 
neous ideas relative to the two colleges. The editor 
of the Amherst Student who prophesied a large score 
in favor of Amherst voiced one of these ideas but 
he failed to reckon with his host. We have always 
considered ourselves one of Amherst's worthy rivals 
for athletic honors and we feel that our successes this 
fall have sustained our assumption. The spirit around 
college this year has been such that our captain and 
manager have been able to do good work with the 
team and we have every reason to believe that next 
year's team will be equally successful, with the able 
management under which it will work. We feel that 
w^e cannot afford to allow the spirit and enthusiasm, 
which has come into existence this fall, to languish or 
die away. We can now v/ith profit turn our efforts 
toward getting ready for indoor athletics this winter. 
Let every man respond to this as he has to the calls 
of our football team and we shall enjoy a success this 
winter equal to our success this fall. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



51 



by the end of the game they knew that they had been 
playing football. The next game was with Wesleyan 
at Middletown, Conn. Our boys were again defeated 
but this game showed to Captain Halligan the weak 
positions in his team and he immediately made some 
important changes. Stanley, who had played left 
guard for three years, was put in left tackle and Snell, 
a new man, was moved from end to guard. Bodfish, 
who had played tackle in these two games, was put in 
right end and Paul, the scrub center, was given a 
position on the 'varsity in place of Bridgeforth. An 
improvement could be seen at once. The team was 
greatly strengthened and although the game with the 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. was loosely played the reason 
was probably on account of the newness of the men 
to the positions. 

On Oct. 14, Aggie defeated the team placed on the 
field by the Pittsfield Bicycle club before a crowd of 
two thousand people. The Pittsfield team was no mean 
opponent and Aggie was forced to play hard. They 
began to realize the full extent of their strength and 
the knowledge increased their courage for during the 
rest of the season they played strong and snappy ball 
and showed a determination to win. The first home 
game was with the Springfield Training School on 
Oct. 18. Although the two teams were about of 
equal weight, the Springfields were simply outclassed 
and Aggie found no trouble in running up a big score. 

The third and last defeat of the season our boys 
suffered at the hands of Trinity college. Our team 
was somewhat crippled by the loss of Chickering, left 
half-back, who was laid up with a sprained ankle. 
During the first half Aggie had the best of the game 
and at the end the score stood 5-0 in our favor. In 
the second half, however, Trinity proved a puzzle for 
our boys and before the time was called had scored 
three touchdowns. The next game was played at 
Burlington, Vt., with the Vermont University team. 
Our team was in excellent condition, every man was 
fit for duty and after a hard and well contested game 
retired from the field victors by a score of 11-6. 
The battle had been a hard one and although no 
severe injuries had been received all the men were so 
bruised that the team was not able to line up against 
the scrub for hard practice before the next game 
which came the following Wednesday. 

This was the Amherst game the result of which 



has caused us so much pride. It is not entirely 
because we beat Amherst but because we beat a col- 
lege of such recognized standing as Amherst has held. 
It also gives us a means of comparing our team with 
some of the larger college teams of the country which 
Amherst plays regularly and which it has never been 
our privilege to meet. It will make it easier for our 
college to obtain permission to send representatives to 
Worcester to the N. E. Intercollegiate Athletic meet 
held in the early summer every year. The boys had 
reason to feel pretty happy after the game ; they were 
proud of their team and at a mass meeting raised 
funds to present each player with a college sweater as 
a reward for his good work in the pass and to encour- 
age a continuation of the same in the future. The 
men went down to the Pratt Field that afternoon 
rather lame and stiff after the hard game of the pre- 
ceding Saturday but filled with determination to win 
or die game. The game was fairly and squarely won 
and was remarkably free from any quarrelling or foul 
playing. Aggie had the ball on the centre line. Hal- 
ligan gave a signal, Cooke opened a hole through the 
tackle, big enough, as an Amherst man put it. " to 
drive a horse and cart through." Halligan saw his 
chance and darted through the opening with the ball, 
dodged the Amherst full back and planted the ball 
directly between the goal posts making a run of fifty- 
five yards. Barry kicked an easy goal and that was 
all the score. 

On Nov. 4, Conn. State College proved an easy 
game. The Conn, boys played hard and well and 
succeeded in making a touchdown. Their team was 
too light for our fellows who, when thoroughly aroused 
toward the latter end of the last half, made two 
touchdowns during the last three minutes of play. 
Williston was our last victim. In spite of the scrub 
team which our visitors had prepared especially for 
our benefit, we defeated them in what might be 
called a rough and tumble game by a score of 17-0. 
The total score of the season is as follows : 
Sept. 23, Aggie, ; Holy Cross, 11. 
Sept. 30, Aggie, ; Wesleyan, 27. 
Oct. 7, Aggie, 17; Springfield Y. M. C. A., 0. 
Oct. 14, Aggie, 12; Pittsfield, 0. 
Oct. 18, Aggie, 34 ; Springfield Training School, 0. 
Oct. 21, Aggie, 5; Trinity, 16. 
Oct. 28, Aggie, 1 1 ; Univ. of Vt., 6. 



52 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Nov. 1, Aggie, 6; Amherst, 0. 

Nov. 4, Aggie, 34 ; Conn. State College, 6. 

Nov. 8, Aggie, 17 ; Williston, 0. 

Total, Aggie, 136 ; all others, 66. 

Touchdowns — Bodfish 1, Halligan 9, Stanley 2, 
Paul 1, O'Hearn 2, Snell 1, Cooke 3, Chickering 2, 
Barry 1. Goals frona touchdowns — Barry 16. Goals 
from field — Halligan 2. 

The men who made up the team for the season are 
as follows : Right end, Bodfish ; right tackle, Cooke ; 
right guard, Gamwell ; center, Paul ; left guard, Snell ; 
left tackle, Stanley; left end, O'Hearn; quarter back. 
Canto ; left half-back, Chickering ; right half-back, 
Barry ; full back, Captain Halligan. The substitutes 
are : center, Bridgeforth ; quarter-back, Whitman ! 
end, Rogers ; back, Pierson. 

Captain Halligan has played on the Aggie 'varsity 
for four years, playing end the first two, fullback the 
latter. During the season of '98 he captained the 
team during the absence of Gaptain Gile and through 
out the entire season gave the signals directing the 
plays. Halligan has made a good captain ; the men 
have practiced well, trained well and played well under 
his orders. He sees the weak points of his opponent's 
team quickly and knows how to make the most out o^ 
his knowledge. As a player, Halligan is a sure man : 
he seldom fumbles, tackles well and hits the line with 
tremendous force. Perhaps his greatest quality is his 
punting ability. In the Amherst game Amherst lost 
the ball on our four-yard line and Halligan punted it 
from behind the goal line over the center of the field 
in a clean kick. He has kicked two goals from the 
field during the season, kicking one in the Trinity 
game from the 25-yard line. 

Canto, our quarter-back, comes to us from Yuca- 
tan, and has played in his present position for four 
years. Canto handles and passes the ball remark- 
ably well and although small and very light, weighing 
only 1 15 lbs., he is quick and the best tackier on the 
team. He is sure to bring down his man every time 
if he once lays his hands upon him and he tackles a 
two-hundred pounder as readily and fearlessly as he 
would a man of his own size. Mr. Canto is a senior 
and has done a great deal for the football interest 
at Aggie, both physically and financially, His place 
on the team will be hard to fill. 

Stanley has played on our team for four seasons 



also, playing left-guard until the present season when 
he was put in left-tackle after the Wesleyan game. 
He is a strong man in the line in either defensive or 
offensive. On account of his strength and speed he 
has been a very valuable man to advance the ball in 
the " tackle back " formation. 

T. F. Cooke has completed his third season on the 
Aggie team, playing one as guard and two as tackle. 
Cook is probably the strongest man on the team. He 
has never fully realized his own strength. His hardest 
opponent has proved weak before him and the holes 
he has opened through the line have been large and 
many. Cooke opened the hole through which Halli- 
gan made his touchdown in the Amherst game. Mr. 
Cooke has been elected captain of the 'varsity for the 
coming season. He richly deserves the position for 
his good and faithful work during the past three sea- 
sons. He knows the game thoroughly and has been 
our best player this fall. We feel perfectly confident 
that the team next year will be well captained and we 
look forward to a season even more successful than 
the present one has been. 

Gamwell, the right-guard, is a new man to the 
game although in his third college year. He has 
made no sensational plays during the season but has 
worked coolly and steadily and proved a hard man to 
move. With Snell, the left-guard, they have formed 
a strong support for the center. Snell is the heaviest 
man on the team. His weight is 192 lbs. He is a 
member of the class of 1903 and comes to us from 
Lawrence. He has had considerable practice in the 
game and when given the ball in " guards back " for- 
mation has made long runs and great advances, 

Paul is rather light for his position as center but he 
passes the ball with great accuracy. This is his first 
season on the team. Bodfish and O'Hearn are also 
new to the Aggie team. Bodfish's experience in 
football was gained by his playing on the" freshman 
team last year while O'Hearn has had considerable 
practice on different teams in the vicinity of his home 
at Pittsfield, Mass. 

The half-backs, Barry and Chickering, both played 
as substitutes during the season of '98. Chickering is 
very fast and sure and follows his interference well. 
He advanced the ball, probably farther than any man 
on the team during the season being particularly valu- 
able on end plays. Barry also follows his interference 



AGGIE LIFE 



53 



well but is slower and more apt to fumble than Chick- 
ering. Barry has kicked all goals from touchdowns, 
kicking sixteen out of a possible twenty-two. 

Whitman has played part of every game during the 
season with the exception of two. He played the 
entire Holy Cross game. Whitman makes a good 
quarter and passes well. It is his first season and he 
promises well for the next team. Pierson, Rogers 
and Bridgeforth have all played in three games and 
have therefore become 'varsity men and are entitled 
to wear the college sweater and letters. The weights 
of the men in suits are as follows : 

lbs. lbs. 

Captain Halligan, 161 Cooke, 183 

Stanley, 177 Gamwell, 182 

Canto, 115 Snell, 192 

Barry, 151 Paul, 165 

Chickering, 159 Bodfish, 156 

O'Hearn, 168 Rogers, 157 

Whitman, 151 Bridgeforth, 165 

Pierson, 168 Average weight, 163 

The good work of the team is due to a great extent 
to the strong scrubs which have lined up against them 
whenever wanted throughout the entire season. Many 
of these men appeared for practice as regularly as 
the 'varsity men and to them the success of the sea- 
son is as much due as to the players themselves. 
The football spirit was kept alive by the games ar- 
ranged by the sophomore and freshman classes and 
to their credit we will say that neither team has been 
beaten during the season by any outsiders. 

The prospect for the next season is very bright. 
But three men will graduate from college who play 
on the team. Whitman can fill Canto's position at 
quarter and Stanley's position in the line can be 
filled. We will feel the loss of our full back to a 
greater extent than the loss of the others. Mr. T. F. 
Cooke of Pittsfield has been elected captain and the 
boys have the greatest confidence in Mr. Cooke and 
his ability both as a player and a captain. Mr. C. L. 
Rice who has managed the team so well this year has 
been re-elected manager and V. A. Gates has been 
elected assistant manager. 



The interest which alumni take in our athletics 
is shown by their letters. A. Whitaker, '81, captain 
of the first M. A. C. football team sends congratula- 
tions to the college for the successful season and 
especially for our team's work in the Amherst game. 



Aggie, 6 ; Amherst, 0. 

On Wednesday, Nov. 1st, Aggie won a decisive 
victory from Amherst on Pratt Field. The field was 
little less than a mud pond so that the ball was very 
slippery, and fumbles were quite frequent, making the 
contest very exciting. 

As usual Halligan lost the toss and Amherst gave 
Aggie the ball. Halligan kicked off the ball being 
downed on the 25 yard line. Amherst then began a 
series of line plays with a pet formation, v/hich served 
to gain short distances by reason of their weight and 
the condition of the field. At the centre of the field 
an Amherst man was caught offside and Aggie was 
given the ball but was unable to advance it and Hal- 
ligan was forced to punt. Amherst again rushed the 
ball to our twenty-yard line and was there held for 
downs. By means of an end-run by Chickering and a 
line plunge by Snell,Aggie carried the ball to the center 
of the field ; there Halligan took the ball for a straight 
line plunge through tackle, he got through the hole, 
hurdled the quarter and made a brilliant run for a 
touchdown, Barry kicking the goal. 

Swift kicked to Halligan who fumbled and was fin- 
ally downed on the ten-yard line. Here Amherst 
took a brace and Halligan was forced to punt. Am- 
herst then kept the ball in her possession until the 
end of the half when it was on Aggie's fifteen-yard 
line. 

In the second half Swift kicked to O'Hearn who ad- 
vanced the ball ten yards, it being downed on Aggie's 
thirty-yard line. The play in this half was much 
snappier than in the first half and Amherst seemed _ 
determined to score. She held Aggie from the start 
and Halligan again resorted to kicking. Amherst 
pushed the ball to Aggies' fifteen yard line and lost it 
on a fumble, then held well, however, and once more 
Halligan kicked it out of danger. At this point Am- 
herst tried some tricks and pushed the ball up Aggies 
five-yard line, but Clark in plunging through the line 
fumbled the ball, it being held by O'Hearn. Halligan 
signaled for a kick and sent the ball beyond the cen- 
ter of the field and here the ball was kept until the 
time was called. 

Halligan, Cooke, and O'Hearn put up the best game 



54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



for Aggie, while Anderson and Swift played a good 
game for Amherst. 

The features of the game were the runs of Capt. 
Halligan and the defensive work of Cooke. The line- 
up is as follows : 

Aggie. Amherst. 

Bodfish, r. e. 1. e., Anderson 

Cooke, r. t. 1. t., Jones 

Gamwell, r. g. 1. g-. Parks 

Paul, c. c, Hammond 

Snell, 1. g. r. g., Larkin 

Stanley, 1. t. r. t.. Brooks 

O'Hearn, 1. e. 1. e., Ballantine 

Canto, Whitman, q. b. q. b., Swift 

Barry, r. h. b. 1. h. b., Dudley 

Chickering, 1. h. b. r. h. b., Birge. Biram 

Halligan, f. ,b. f. b., Clark 

Score — Aggie [6; Amherst 0. Touchdown — Halligan. 
Goal — Barry. Time — 20 and 15 minute halves. Referee — 
Strong. Umpire — Lull. Linemen — Vanderbilt and Rice. 
Time-keeper — Morse. 

Aggie, 34 ; Conn. State College 6. 

Aggie won one more easy victory from Conn, on 
the campus last Saturday Jhe fourth. The home team 
had greatly underated the strength of the visitors and 
so played a lifeless game during the first half. In the 
second half they woke up and played snappy ball with 
a vengeance. 

Halligan kicked off to Osman who was downed in 
his tracks. Conn, made so.me good rushes and car- 
ried the ball to Aggie's forty-yard line where they lost 
it on a fumble. Aggie then sent Chickering around 
the end for a brilliant run, played through the tackles 
and pushed Barry over for the first touchdown. Barry 
kicked the goal. The play in this half was not very 
rapid both teams seeming to put no ginger into the 
game. However, the combinations for end plays and 
tackle plays were good and Aggie would have scored 
often had not some costly fumbles spoiled her chances. 
In this half, Cooke was sent across the line, and Ag- 
gie used her double-pass to good advantage, once gain- 
ing twenty and another time fifteen yards. The half 
ended Aggie 12, Storrs, 0. 

In the second half Aggie was scored on by means 
of a long brilliant run. Storrs played hard for a few 
moments till it looked like another score. At 
this point Aggie braced and played a very hard game, 
gaining ground with every play. With ten minutes to 
play they pushed the ball up for two touchdowns. The 



ball being kicked off from the second touchdown with 
three minutes to play, Aggie made some long runs 
and sent Chickering over and then Cooke, the whistle 
being blown for time, while the ball was on its way 
for a touchdown. 

Cooke, Chickering and Halligan played the strong- 
est game for Aggie, while Lyman did the best work 
for Storrs. The line-up : 

O'Hearn, 1. e. r. e., McClean, Williams 

Stanley, 1. t. r. t.. Downing 

Snell, 1. g, r. g., Emmons 

Paul, Bridgforth, c, c, Edwards 

Gamwell. r. g. 1. g.. Haney 

Cooke, r. t. 1. t., Twing 

Bodfish, r. e. 1. e., Lyman 

Whitman, Canto, q. b. q. b., Osman 

Chickering, 1. h, b. r. h. b., Lyman 

Barry, r. h. b. 1. h. b.. Bishop 

HalHgan, f. b. f. b., Clark 

Score — Aggie 34, Storrs 6. Touchdowns — Barry, Cooke 
2, Halligan, Lyman, Chickering 2. Goals from touchdown — 
Barry 4, Lyman 1. Referee — T. D. Knowles. Umpire — G. 
P. Parmenter. Linemen — Leslie Vollett. Timekeeper — 
Morse. Time — ^20 minute halves. 

Aggie, 17; Willlston, 0. 

On last Wednesday, one week ago, Aggie played 
her last scheduled game on the campus with Willis- 
ton. The day was in every way an ideal one for the 
game but despite the fact, the backs on both teams 
seemed to find it very difficult to hold the ball, fum- 
bles being more frequent in this game than in any 
other throughout the entire season. 

Halligan won the toss in thfs game and gave the 
ball to the visitors for the kick-off. The ball was 
kicked to Gamwell who fumbled the ball being se- 
cured by Williston. On their first play the ball was 
again fumbled and Canto secured it, making it Ag- 
gie's ball on her thirty-five yard line. Capt. Halligan 
then sent Chickering around the end, on the end and 
tackle-over play for a good gain. ' The tackles were 
worked for short gains, and Bodfish made a run of 
twenty-five yards on a double pass. Then followed a 
few short gains and Halligan went through left tackle 
for a touchdown. Barry kicked the goal. 

The ball was kicked to Canto who advanced it ten 
yards, the same tactics were followed and in three 
minutes Cooke crossed the line for a touchdown, Barry 
kicking the goal. During the rest of this half the ball 
was kept in Aggie's territory, and when time was 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



called it was in Williston's possession on the fifteen 
yard line. 

Halligan kicked off to Clark who advanced the ball 
five yards before being downed. Williston began a 
series of line bucking plays gainJii! 



Impressions of an Idler. 

There have been a few things happening about col- 
lege during the last fortnight that have caused many to 

id perhaps, caused them 

;tra, to see a little better, 

they thought they saw, 



It's a Fact! 

Vou can7iot get elsewhere such stylish ready 
to wear suits as at Campions 

"TO'hy! 

Because every stiit bought from us ..c, c..// alter to the 

latest style. Coat shoulders padded. Trousers 

made peg top. Anything else you ZLurut 

will cost you nothing. As 
we have the men to do it in the store. 



Hunt's Block. 



CAMPIOIT, 

Fashionable Tailor and Clothier. 



of the papers a statement to the effect that the recent 
victory of Aggie over Amherst at foot ball was the 
first in the history of the college. This is an error. 
Oct. 3,' 1885, Aggie won from Amherst 4 — 0. Oct. 
7, 1885, Aggie won from Amherst 12 — 0. (See '87 
Index, p. 82.) My impression is that the M. A. C. 
team of '80 and '81 won from Amherst but of this I 
am not certain. Inclosed find favorable newspaper 
mention of a former '87 man. Very truly, 

F. H. Fowler, '87. 



A fortnight ago he over- 
kn official that electric 
the walk leading to the 
I they are being put up, 
(not a few did rub their 
^rtainty. It was a sur- 
/ith the Idler. For he 

le campus and saw the 
and earnestness that 
[predicted some happy 
|e to be played, to the 
football team and of its 
feasantly surprised, and 
into his pocket will 
kmber of the class of 
Daper a few weeks ago 
we have books that 
Iwhich the world would 
[igainst their loss, a fire- 
d not be out of place 
|s. ■' Again the Idler, 
mountain top descend- 
heart of every patri- 
to the swelling chest 
as donned a football, 
and the voice says : 
field," and no doubt 
i^lso an alumnus, spoke 



those words at a social gathering of the fraternities a 
few nights ago, he was pleased at the way in which all 
those present approved what he said, with tremendous 
applause. 

Another inducement to the alumni to hand over 
the money for the cause already referred to, is the 
genuine college spirit that has existed and is destined 
to exist. I speak of the social gathering of the frater- 
nities held in the Chapel a week or so ago. If there 
ever was any college spirit in an institution there was 



54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Amhel 
-20 an 



for Aggie, while Anderson and Swift played a good 
game for Amherst. 

The features of the game were the runs of Capt. 
Halligan and the defensive work of Cooke. The line- 
up is as follows : 
Aggie. 

Bodfish, r. e. 
Cooke, r. t. 
Gamwell, r. g. 
Paul, c. 
Snell. 1. g. 
Stanley, 1. t. 
O'Hearn, 1. e. 
Canto, Whitman, q. b. 
Barry, r. h. b. 
Chickering, 1. h. b. 
Halligan, f. b. 

Score — Aggie [6 
Goal — Barry. Time- 
Strong. Umpire — Lull 
Time-keeper — Morse. 

Aggie, 34 ; Con 

Aggie won one more 
the campus last Saturda; 
had greatly underated th 
so played a lifeless game 
second half they woke up 
a vengeance. 

Halligan kicked off to 
his tracks. Conn, made 
ried the ball to Aggie's f 
it on a fumble. Aggie th] 
the end for a brilliant run 
and pushed Barry over for] 
kicked the goal. The pi 
rapid both teams seemin 
game. However, the co 
tackle plays were good a 
often had not some costly 
In this half, Cooke was s 

gie used her double-pass to good advantage, once gain 
ing twenty and another time fifteen yards. The half 
ended Aggie 12, Storrs, 0. 

In the second half Aggie was scored on by means 
of a long brilliant run. Storrs played hard for a few 
moments till it looked like another score. At 
this point Aggie braced and played a very hard game, 
gaining ground with every play. With ten minutes to 
play they pushed the ball up for two touchdowns. The 



ball being kicked off from the second touchdown with 
three minutes to play, Aggie made some long runs 
and sent Chickering over and then Cooke, the whistle 
being blown for time, while the ball was on its way 
for a touchdown. 

Cooke, Chickering a nd Hall 




worked for short gains, and Bodfish made a run of 
twenty-five yards on a double pass. Then followed a 
few short gains and Halligan went through left tackle 
for a touchdown. Barry kicked the goal. 

The ball was kicked to Canto who advanced it ten 
yards, the same tactics were followed and in three 
minutes Cooke crossed the line for a touchdown, Barry 
kicking the goal. During the rest of this half the ball 
was kept in Aggie's territory, and when time was 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



called it was in Williston's possession on the fifteen 
yard line. 

Halligan kicked off to Clark who advanced the ball 
five yards before being downed. Williston began a 
series of line bucking plays gaining short distance up 
to Aggie's forty-yard line. Here she tried an end 
play and sent Nutting around for ten yards. They 
tried the other end and fumbled the ball. Aggie took 
the ball, advanced it fifteen yards and then punted, 
Williston getting the ball on her thirty yard line. She 
again lost it on a fumble and soon Halligan pushed it 
to the line and carried it over by means of some 
strong line bucking. Barry failed at goal. 

During the remainder of the half the ball changed 
hands several times everyone developing a tendency 
toward dropping the ball. When time was called it 
■was Aggie's ball on the forty yard line. 

The feature of the game was the team work of Ag- 
gie on offense. In defensive play both teams showed 
deplorable weakness. 

The line-up : 
Aggie. Williston. 

O'Hearn, 1. e. r. e., Clancy 

Stanley, 1. t. r. t., O'Neill 

Snell, 1. g. r. g., Nase 

Paul, c. c, Nelson 

Gamwell, r. g. 1. g., Coterell 

Cooke, r. t. 1. t., Kirkland 

Bodfish, r. e. 1. e.. Nutting 

Canto, q. b, q. b.. Himebaugh 

Ciiickering, Pierson, 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Bard 

Barry, r. h. b. 1. h. b., Foster 

Halligan, f. b. t. b.. Clark 

Score — Aggie 17, Williston 0. Touchdowns — Halligan 2, 
Cooke. Goals from touchdown — Barry 2. Referee — Strong. 
Umpire — Gladwin. Linesmen — Leslie Elder. Time — 20 
myiute halves. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Editors Aggie Life: — I have noticed in several 
of the papers a statement to the effect that the recent 
victory of Aggie over Amherst at foot ball was the 
firsi in the history of the college. This is an error. 
Oct. 3,' 1885, Aggie won from Amherst 4 — 0. Oct. 
7, 1885, Aggie won from Amherst 12 — 0. (See '87 
Index, p. 82.) My impression is that the M. A. C. 
team of '80 and '81 won from Amherst but of this I 
am not certain. Inclosed find favorable newspaper 
mention of a former '87 man. Very truly, 

F. H. Fqwler, '87, 



mpr^Sjions 



an 



Idl 



^r. 



There have been a few things happening about col- 
lege during the last fortnight that have caused many to 
open their eyes in wonder, and perhaps, caused them 
to rub their eyes a little bit extra, to see a little better, 
or to know for sure that what they thought they saw, 
really did happen. 

But not so with the Idler. A fortnight ago he over- 
heard a remark made by an official that electric 
lights were to be placed along the walk leading to the 
boarding house. Now, as they are being put up, 
many look surprised, perhaps not a few did rub their 
eyes to see if it is a sure certainty. It was a sur- 
prise to them. But, not so with the Idler. For he 
had already heard of it. 

Again as he strolled along the campus and saw the 
team practicing with a zeal a.nd earnestness that 
could not be equalled, he predicted some happy 
results when the games were to be played, to the 
credit of the college, of the football team and of its 
captain. The Alumnus is pleasantly surprised, and 
when his hand goes deeper into his pocket will 
he not heed the voice of a member of the class of 
eighty-two who in the college paper a few weeks ago 
says, " We need a new library ; we have books that 
we cannot afford to lose ; or which the world would 
not care to lose and to insure against their loss, a fire- 
proof ' Goodell Library ' would not be out of place 
anywhere on ' Aggie's grounds. " Again the Idler, 
" Hears a voice way up on the mountain top descend- 
ing down below " to the beating heart of every patri- 
otic alumnus of the institution ; to the swelling chest 
of every undergraduate who has donned a football, 
baseball or track team suit, and the voice says: 
" We need a new athletic field," and no doubt 
when that instructor, who is also an alumnus, spoke 
those words at a social gathering of the fraternities a 
few nights ago, he was pleased at the way in which all 
those present approved what he said, with tremendous 
applause. 

Another inducement to the alumni to hand over 
the money for the cause already referred to, is the 
genuine college spirit that has existed and is destined 
to exist. I speak of the social gathering of the frater- 
nities held in the Chapel a week or so ago. If there 
ever was any college spirit in an institution there was 



S6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



plenty of it manifested that night. Faculty, gradu- 
ates, and students seemed bound together for a pur- 
pose. If perhaps any one don't understand why I tell 
of these things, let him read the account of Aggie's 
attempt to represent a team on the gridiron, the 
result of which surprised not a few, or he should 
have entered the Chapel the night of the fraternity 
gathering where all was as one, and he would have 
said it was good and would have smiled with them all. 

The Idler. 



^olle^? ^otfs- 



— M. A. C, 6— Amherst, 0. 

— M. A.C., 17— Williston 0. 

— T. Graves went to Hatfield to vote. 

— John Francis Carmody of Bondsville has entered 
the freshman class. 

— E. L. Gamwell has been called home on account 
of illness in the family. 

— The college sweaters for the 'varsity foot ball 
players have been ordered. 

— The evening after the Williston game our varsity 
very successfully broke training in the Drill Hall. 

— Now is the time for the Sophomore and Fresh- 
man teams to be preparing for their interclass foot ball 
game. 

— There is a premium on cats about college now 
that the Juniors have become interested in these 
quadrupeds. 

— C. M. Kinney and H. T. Kelley attended the 
Young peoples' Religious Union Conference held at 
Deerfield, Nov. 4th. 

— The Sophomores — at least most of them — have 
finished Trig, and now the class are taking notes from 
lectures on surveying. 

— A. L. Emerich '97 has been around college say- 
ing good bye preparatory to leaving for the West on 
account of his health. 

— Owing to a slight injury received while playing 
foot ball, the celebrated time keeper, Morse, has been 
sporting a cane lately. 

— Professor Babson has been unable to meet his 
classes lately, owing to his being called home on 
account of his fs^ther's serious illness, 



— On account of the crippled condition of the Wor- 
cester Tech. foot ball team, they have canceled both 
their games with us and have disbanded for the season. 

— The boiler in the Drill Hall has been repaired so 
there is no reason why the Hall should not be warm 
enough this winter for the candidates for track team 
and the base ball team to train. 

— Just after the Williston game as the foot ball 
team was about to disband, they elected the following 
officers for the subsequent year : Cooke, Captain ; 
Rice, Business Manager ; Gates, Assistant Business 
Manager. 

— The picture of the foot ball team and also last 
spring's track team picture are to be placed in the 
Reading Room ; the names of the men of each team 
will be given and in the latter the number of points 
won by each member. 

— The Physical Geography class of the Ware High 
school visited college recently to inspect the Weather 
Observatory in connection mth their study of Meteor- 
ology. After seeing the instruments in the tower, their 
manner of working and the way in which the records 
are kept, they visited other points of interest about 
college. 

— Wednesday evening Webster Ellsworth, a relation 
of Noah Webster and a member of the " Century " 
company of New York gave an address on " Arnold 
and Andre" in ihe Town Hall. It was illustrated 
finely by stereopticon views, some of them being taken 
from rare points quite difficult to procure. The lecturer 
began with Arnold, giving a brief account of his life 
from his birth to the time when he began to have secret 
correspondence with Major Andre ; then he associated 
the two together in a very interesting manner, Arnold 
was born at Corinth, Connecticut and was a descend- 
ant of the governor of Rhode Island. He was a happy- 
go-lucky boy getting into the usual boyish scrapes 
until he started in life for himself in a drug store. 
Then followed the usual historical facts of his great 
bravery at Crown Point and at other places, of his 
being given the command of Philadelphia, and of his 
chagrin at Washington's censure. His gaining the 
command of West Point leading to his treason and 
then his betraying it through Andre, who was hanged 
for a spy, were very well described. The capture and 
death of Andre were most pathetic, Andre, who was 



AGGIE LIFE. 



57 



a lover of poetry and romance and a favorite among 
his fellows, seemed almost a needless sacrifice. The 
next lecture in the course will be one bj' Russell 
H. Conwell " The Angel's City," December 6. 

— A social gathering was held in the Chapel on 
Saturday evening, November fourth. The students 
sang comic and college songs, and selections 
were rendered by C. M. Kinney on the organ and M. 
H. West on the cornet. Professor Mills spoke of the 
fine showing our foot ball team has made this season, 
saying that the faculty sympathizes with their efforts 
and those of the students who aided in their success, 
and although he himself knew nothing of the game he 
was very glad that the students en masse were so enthus- 
iastic in their support and in the welfare of the team 
as he notices most gratifying results ; this working 
together for a common interest has greatly done away 
with college, class, and fraternity politics and has pro- 
moted concord. He proposed that three cheers should 
be given for the foot ball team, and they were given 
with a will. Prof. Cooley was next called upon ; he 
said that besides having Prof. Mills' sentiments towards 
foot ball he took a lively interest in the game itself, 
having played on the team while a student here. He 
told how excited he felt during the game with Amherst 
and how glad he was that we won, as he thought our 
team without a doubt outplayed their opponents. It 
is not true, he said, that this is the first time M. A. 
C, has ever defeated Amherst, for in 1885 they played 
four games with them and won two and tied one. 
Prof. Brooks then told about our prospective athletic 
field, saying that they had a certain field in view which 
was well suited for the purpose both for drainage and 
grading and for its proximity to the college. A stock 
company has been founded and instead of asking for 
money, be said that they would ask the alumni and 
others to take stock in their company ; this he thonght 
would be a good plan as it is more business like and 
in case the undertaking should be a failure the stock- 
holders could receive their share of the spoils. Dr. 
Walker also expressed himself as pleased with athletic 
spirit which now prevails. He remarked that boys 
and young men need physical exercise and exciting 
games and competitions to give vent to their natural 
bouyancy and craving for activity. He then narrated 
how in his boyhood days they managed to obtain diver- 



sion although they had no athletic contests, by indulg- 
ing in all manner of boyish games, by engaging in ail 
manner of mischief, by racing with the rival volunteer 
fire companies to fires — and they arranged that no 
long period elapsed without fires, —and by engaging 
in the free fights that always occured when the rival 
companies met. Then the war broke out and the fact 
that the greater part of the army was composed of 
youths under twenty-one shows that the boys of those 
days, although they had no foot ball contests, had no 
mean goal to strive for. Refreshments were served 
during the intermission between the speeches, and at 
the close of the evening it was decided to raise money 
to secure college sweaters for the 'varsity team in 
token of our gratification for the fine record they have 
made this fall. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Tales of the Malayan Coast, by Wildman. Mr. 
Wildman, the American Consul General at Hong- 
Kong, has dedicated the book to his friend Admiral 
Dewey. It consists of several short stories, mostly of 
adventure, with tigers, crocodiles and wild boars much 
in evidence. Every page of the book shows the 
author's familiarity with the manners and customs of 
the natives, thus it is in a way instructive as well as 
entertaining. 

Insects, (Part II) by David Sharp, M. A., F. R. S., 
volume VI of the Cambridge Natural History. This is 
an excellent work and one that will be heartily wel- 
comed by all students of entomology. The first part 
of Dr. Sharp's work appeared four years ago in the 
ifth volume of Cambridge Natural History. This last 
volume which has just been published deals with the 
Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, 
Thysanoptera and Hemiptera. Although the arrange- 
ment and classification used in this work is at vari- 
ance with the ideas of some of the other authoritative 
entomologists, the various groups are treated admir- 
ably and quite fully. This volume with the one pre- 
ceding it will find and keep a place on the desk of 
every working entomologist for it is one of the best 
general treatises on insects which has yet appeared. 

The Lesson of Popular Government by Gamaliel 
Bradford. This book might be called a Defence of 
Democracy. The author is acquainted with the true 



4<<ifth 



58 



AGGIE LIFE. 



state of government in this country and realizes that 
in practice it is far from an ideal one. He is firm in 
the belief however that a democratic form of govern- 
ment is in its nature reasonable, sound and on the 
whole benificient. He quotes from an English writer 
as expressing his own ideas," The failures of govern- 
ment in the United States are not the result of de- 
mocracy, but of the craftiest combinations of schemes 
to defeat the will of democracy ever devised in the 
world." The chief point which the book brings for- 
ward is that the idea of government by a legislature is 
a wrong one. The only essential part of a govern- 
ment is the executive. The function of the legisla- 
ture should be not to govern but to see that the exec- 
utive gaverns honestly and in the public interest, or 
in other words to obtain the advantages and prevent 
the abuse of executive power. The grasping ambi- 
tion of the legislature has absorbed the power of gov- 
ernment leaving the executive a mere agent for car- 
rying out its orders, " The only hope of remedy," 
the author states, " lies in the rehabilitation of the 
executive and the remanding of the legislature to its 
proper functions. This will never be done by the leg- 
islature ; it can only result from an appeal to the 
people by the executive, which sooner or later must 
come in one of two forms : either constitutionally and 
with the preservation of a proper adjustment of power 
between the two brances, or by violent action of the 
executive, with tacit assent or impotence to resist on 
the part of the people, in abolishing the legislature, at 
least in substance, and the substitution of military 
force." Here the author sees fit to discontinue the 
use of his colored glasses and in conclusion he is quite 
confident that all the difficulties will be successfully 
overcome by improved organization and a government 
nearer to the ideal result. 



As the Exchange editor repeatedly looks over pa- 
pers which have no exchange column he can hardly 
help asking himself whether such a department is nec- 
essary or not. He begins to wonder if the Exchange 
column is simply an effort to fill up space, and if it is 
anything but conservatism which impels him to keep 
it up. These are the questions which naturally pre- 



sent themselves as we search in vain through a paper 
for some recognition of the outside journalistic world. 

A great many of the best representative papers of 
the student world do not pay the slightest heed to the 
Exchange department ; while the fact yet remains 
that they are the papers best qualified to make such 
a department most valuable. The writer has no sym- 
pathy with their laissez /aire policy. Though the 
Exchange department probably began in a simple 
way, we know that it has now outgrown its swaddling 
clothes and at present occupies a fairly important pos- 
ition. Much may yet be done to make this depart- 
ment interesting and useful ; and we eagerly await 
the time when those papers, whose opinions and crit- 
icism we know will be appreciated, shall open their 
eyes to this truth. 

" The Leader of His Class," a short story of three 
chapters and covering as many pages, in the Holy 
Cross Purple for November has the true ring. The 
author has evidently written with a personal apprecia- 
tion of the truth he would set forth. The sad, but 
happily planned, ending of their story carries with it a 
most wholesome lesson. 

In the Polytechnic for October are some fine arti- 
cles. Deserving of particular mention is the story 
entitled " A Fair Confederate and a Yank." 

" Rational Gymnastics," by William Skarstrom is 
the title of an instructive article concluded in the last 
number of The Tech. 

In the Advance for October we note that one of our 
stories is copied in full, and that we are given credit 
for it in somebody's hand writing. We trust that who- 
ever took pains to write Aggie Life after this article 
in our Exchange did not fail to do likewise with the 
others. The story is entitled "The Tale of a Hat." 

" Resolves," unmarked by anything which would in- 
dicate that it was copied, stands as original with the 
English High School Recorder. It is worth notice : 

"The wave is mighty, but the spray is wealt ; 
And oftentimes our great and high resolves, 
Grand in their meaning, as an ocean wave. 
Break into a spray of nothing." 

The Phoenix must give us a little more literary mat- 
ter. We think that an improvement along this line is 
necessary to make this paper an interesting Exchange. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



59 



\umni. 



M. A. C, Men. 

Fourteenth consecutive annual dinner of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultultural College club of New York, 
will be held at hotel St. Denis, Broadway and 11th 
Street, New York, Friday evening, December 8th- 
1899. Under the presidency of Farnaer Charles Ed- 
ward Beach, '82, of West Hartford, Conn. Come, 
reserve this date, and bring some recent alumnus or 
former student with you. 

Dr. John A. Cutter, '82, Historian. 
A. L. Fowler, '80, Sec, 

119 Mercer Street, New York, N. Y. 



To M. A. C. '82 Men. 

November 3rd, 1899. 
Dear Classmates: — The New York M. A. C. club 
was founded by Cutter in 1886, after the suggestion 
of Plumb and Allen made in 1883. Thus its incep- 
tion was due wholly to '82. Annual dinners have 
been regularly held and the members look forwa>-d to 
such as family reunions of the sons of our Alma 
Mater. It is my hope this year that an unusually 
large number may attend. President Goodell and 
others of the Faculty will be present. Time and 
place : Friday, December 8th, 7 p. m., St. Denis 
Hotel, Broadway and 11th Street. Cost; $3.00 a 
plate; notify Treasurer A. L. Fowler, '80, 119 Mer- 
cer Street, New York, by sending same on or before 
December 4th, 1889. Yours in '82, 

Charles E. Beach, President, 

West Hartford, Conn. 



At a meeting of the executive committee of the 
M. A. C. Alumni Association, held last Monday after- 
noon, the 6th inst., S. F. Howard, '94, assis't profes- 
sor of Chemistry, M. A. C, was elected treasurer of 
the Association, to fill the vacancy caused by the res- 
ignation of R. E. Smith, '94, assist, professor of Bot- 
any, M. A. C. The attention required of Mr. Smith 
as a member of the athletic board of the College 
prompted his resignation. He has, however, ac- 
cepted the office of vice-president, previously held by 
Mr. Howard. 



'81. — Joseph L. Hills, director Agricultural Exper- 
iment Station. Burlington, Vt. 

'81. — Charles A. Bowman. Division Engineer, 
Reservoir Department, Metropolitan Water Board. 
Address, Clinton, Mass. 

'82. — The " Department of Hygiene, with special 
reference to state and preventive medicine " of the 
Dietetic & Hygienic Gazette is edited by John A. Cut- 
ter, M. D. 

'83.- — Joseph B. Lindsey, who has been ill for 
eight months, has recovered sufficiently to go to the 
sanitarium at Saratoga, N. Y. 

'85. — Edwin W.Allen resides at 1725 Riggs Place, 
Washington, D. C. 

'86.— C. F. W. Felt is Chief Engineer of the Gulf, 
Colorado & Fanta Fe Railway Compony. Address, 
Galveston, Texas. 

'87. — Dr. Edward R. Flint's address is. Box 24. 
Clifton, Mass. Dr. Flint is taking up a course of 
study at the Harvard Medical School. 

Ex- '87. — Rev. Herbert J. White has tendered his 
resignation as pastor of the Bethany Baptist church, 
West Cottage street, Roxbury, Mass., to take effect 
November 30th. He has accepted a call to the pas- 
torate of the First Baptist church, Beverly, Mass., 
and will begin his labors there December 1st. Dur- 
ing Mr. White's pastorate 225 members have united 
with the church and he has been most successful in 
his work, being very popular with all classes, Mr. 
White is president of the Baptist ministers' confer- 
ence of Boston, and he is in great demand through- 
out New England as a speaker and preacher. He is 
a fine pulpit orator, has a good command of language, 
and is full of ready wit. Before coming to Roxbury, 
Mr. White was pastor of the Eastern Avenue Baptist 
church, in Joliet. lit., which he organized and built. 
He is a native of Leominster, where he was born in 
1864. He attended the public schools of Boston and 
Hyde Park ; received his ministerial education in 
Colgate University and the Newton Theological Insti- 
tution. He was ordained to the ministry in Joliet, 
December 5, 1890. His first preaching was done as 
an evangelist in Chicago, under Mr. Moody. 

'88. — The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
S. Cooley, Elizabeth Content, was baptized at the 



6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Congregational church, North Amherst, Sunday, Oc- 
tober 5th. 

'88. — J. E. Holt, Manager of the North Orange 
Co-operative Creamery Association. Address, North 
Orange, Mass. 

'90. — Charles H. Jones, Assist. Chemist, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Burlington, Vt. 

Ex-'90. — H. S. Courtney and J. R. Dutcher are 
in the florist business at Nyack, N. Y. At present 
they have five large green-houses, 25x100 feet long, 
stocked with carnations and roses. They are meet- 
ing with good success. 

'91. — " Aggie Life is a welcome visitor to my table, 
and its pages are eagerly scanned for news concern- 
ing the College and my College mates. Of course 
the Alumni notes appeal most strongly to many men, 
but we are all interested In the progress Aggie is 
making." 

E. P. Felt, '91, 
132 Central Avenue, Albany, N. Y. 

We are glad to receive the above expression from 
Mr. Felt, and further would say, that between the 
present date and the middle of next term, a circular 
letter with return envelope will be sent to each alum- 
nus. Let each one make manifest his interest in the 
College and College paper by answering and giving 
notes and expression of ideas. Attention is called to 
the suggestion made by C. S. Plumb, '82, in the last 
issue of the Aggie Life. It is one well worthy of con- 
sideration. 



'93. — Dr. and Mrs. H. D. Clark announce the birth 
of a son. Chester Frederic, in Fitchburg, October 31st, 
1899. 

'94. — A. C. Curtiss. Address, 54 Pinckney Street, 
Boston, Mass, Mr. Curtiss is a student at Emerson's 
School of Oratory. 

'94. — A. J. Morse. Address, 54 Pinckney Street, 
Boston, Mass. Mr. Morse is a student at the Boston 
University Law School. 

'97. — John A. Emrich has gone to Colorado 
Springs, Colo., with the idea of bettering his health, 
and also of looking for a desirable position. 

'97. — Geo. D. Leavens, was married to Miss Jenny 
S. Briggs at Pawtucket, R. I., on Oct. 24, 1899. Mr. 
and Mrs. Leavens will be at home in Grafton, Mass., 
after December 1st. 



'97. — Clayton F. Palmer is professor of Agricul- 
ture and Nature Study, State Normal School, Mans- 
field, Pa.; address, Tioga Co. Mr. Palmer has been 
very pleasantly situated at the State Normal School, 
since the beginning of the school year and is very suc- 
cessful in his work. 

'98. — Willis Fisher is at present visiting friends in 
Amherst. 

'99. — Sympathy is extended to W. E. Chapin, 
whose father died recently. Mr. Chapin paid the col- 
lege a visit a short time ago, and has completed tak- 
ing the school census upon which he was engaged. 
Address, Chicopee, Mass. 

'99. — W. A. Hooker is taking post-graduate work 
in Chemistry, at M. A. C. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Reinember these suits AT&pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Antherst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand' 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
W^rite at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHINQ CO., 
134 Van Buren St. , Chicago. 



AnHa$-r, Aa$$. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



niiintniiigiinniiiiiinniiiiuiiiiinuuiiiiiiiiniiiiuuiiiiiiiuiiaiiiiEiiuy 



£ Is your exercise making? To make the hard 
5 and supple kind, rub down after every spell 
5 of exercising, •with 



ApOdj|qe|,|^g^E^-f 



I Ittones the nervous system, prevents and a 

■ removes stiffness and soreness, and is the a 

3 best remedy known for sprains. In use for a 

a 90 years. Sold in two size bottles— 25 cents g 

I and 50 cents. | 

I I, S. JOHNSON «& CO., Boston, Maes. | 



TEACHERS WANTED' 



mm TEHGPRS' flfiEKoiEs OF mmi 



Rev. L. D, BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pittsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York,-Washlngton, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHlNGTOfl, D. C, OP PITTSBOI^G, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. :n^. bkow:s^ d. d. s. 



STS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Houks : t a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



jewelAr, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras a7id Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



A.GGiE JLli^'i^. 



Start in Basiness fof Yoarself . 



success A88UBED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all throuiiih Amer- 
ica. 



DARFAGM & RICH, 

5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. T^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 

iHLER II STOVES HI mm. 



AGENT FOB THE CELEBKATED 



Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. ELDE 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 



All kinds of 



HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Grotips, <2fc. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and alw'ays fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY 

l^ All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^ 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehusetts Jlgpiealtqfal College. 

AT THE 

COLIilSGEI TMJLM. 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 



J 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For Information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGli 



[i^E. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Pajier, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ging«r 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. E. mOKINBDn, H. B. E. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



"Office Hours: 

9 TO IS A.. Is/L., 1-30 TO 5 I». 3Vr. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered -when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

lESTJBBElIS OOOIDS. 

-FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



tf3f Repairing done while you %vait,..^lg 
3 FM(EN1X ROW. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT STJtEUT, AMHERST, MAS8, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

Hats, Gaps, Gloves, Gents' Fyriisigs, 

FINE REAOy-MADE SUITS, 

ALSO 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low ^s $10. 



:e=:e3:.^:e2,i>v1:^^cist. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Mttallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
■west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-Operative Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establisliment 



A-Sgi© J>k.s:&rrt.-t^ 



H. Iv. CjECJVJVEJ »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Tliursday delivered Saturday. 

SS^s:S.A.TISFA.CTIOIsr O-XJA-HA-ISTTEBID. H-S^ 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



^PartriUp's flllletic Oilfitfiis.* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NE\N STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



.F. 



D. B, Kblton. 



•? 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PeOLTBY, VE&ETHBLES, FISP m OYSTEM. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyokc. 



PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 

J^. J. ®CHIIvI^.iVI«EJ, 

IM Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



Tpn^jnw 




Consider— If yon can keep the wet ont yj 

of your rifle it will not rMsmo5/ree«e. Only y\ 

i Marlin Repeaters I 

ff have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 1( 



have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date infor- 



mation about powders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed. 
Jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.; 
trajectories, Telocitiea,penetratious. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
If , 1,000 other things, including many trade 
5 J I secrets never before given to the public 
WFre» if you will send stamps for postage U> 
^' The Marlia Firearms Co., New Havea, Ct. 



l^»'»5^'-..^ig^^<'S^?#^^ 



The i. N. Spear Book Store. 

established fifty tears. 

Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFiELD, 

i=xa:oTOC3-:E3-^:F'i3:Eis. 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, §2.00 and §2.50 per doz. 
Cards, §1.50 and §1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
Studi; 17 Spring Btreet, - - A.MMERST, MASS, 



Hmberst Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manaqbr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE>ND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



e:. o. 

10 Phoenix Row, 



Amherst, Mass, 



DEALEK IN 



WfiTGHES, GIiOGKS, JEWEIiHY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 



REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTL.Y DONE. 
AMHEEST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

KANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 



-ALSO - 



STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



we; MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The ^oFthamptoQ Art Store. 

I,. K. CHEW, Manager. 

CoK. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 

MASS. jlGRICULTUI(AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We ■would Inform tlie friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TKUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 



AMHERST. MASS. 



GLYNN, 



/ 



^ TA I LP R> 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



/Iftassacbuectts 

HGticultural 

College 



• OFFERS • 

1. A SHOUT WINTER COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



^v 




,^/' 



/ 



4# 




JG^' ^ y ^^ 



Iloi^. 29, 1899. 



'yf^^^' 




% 



.^ eri'lo -tilt -oro-l 

Ooiieg:e« 



•• ^* 



NO. 6. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISHINGS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash onl}'^, and thus have no losses. We also sell Fui-nishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest ot new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all yon can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



A. B. CALL, 



273 Hain St., 



Society * Catering. 



I^^BEST MEALS SERVED IN NORTHAMPTON.:.^ 
GIVE US A CALL. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos — all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AWHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



limii^ 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $S-00. 



re:pairino. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding a^id Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



COLLEriE 
JEWELER 



BENNETT 



G0LLE6E 
JEWELEB 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

4®>EYES FITTED FBEE.=S8r 
By a graduate of De. Fostek, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 



Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




UNDEE THE HOTEL. 



c= \ 



AQQIE LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 29, 1899, 



NO. 6 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested ta notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, "00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

LEANDER CHAFIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o* United States and Canada, 26c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



£cli'to rials. 



For the past few years there has been held in the 
Drill Hall a dancing class during the fall and winter 
terms. This has in most instances been very suc- 
cessful but only in a limited way. The number of 
students taking lessons has not been as large as one 
would expect under existing condition. This year the 
class has been organized in a more thorough manner 
and a much larger number of pupils is the result. 
We should all endeavor to encourage the manage- 
ment of the class by arousing the interest of those 
who do not already dance. The success of our mili- 
tary ball is directly dependent upon the success of our 
dancing class and for this reason it is necessary to 
get as large a class as possible. As to the import- 
ance of our military ball, but little need be said as we 
all appreciate that it is the one great social event of ' 
our college year. 



Our Thanksgiving recess is -now close at hand and 
soon the most of us shall depart for a brief stay at 



our respective homes. This year we have many 
things to be thankful for. Our college has fully 
emerged from the lethargic state into which she was 
forced by the great business depression which some time 
ago swept over the country. She has had her scope 
broadened by the addition of new buildings, and she 
has attained her rightful position in the athletic arena. 
These three things are sufficient to call forth thanks 
from every loyal student but they alone do not consti- 
tute all which the year has brought us. . The esprit de 
corp? of the college has changed wonderfully and for 
the better during the past year and in many lesser 
ways we have greatly advanced. Let us hope that 
we can continue our advancement so that when 
another year rolls round we shall have even more to 
be thankful for than we have this year. 



' At a meeting of the athletic board held last Friday, 
several additions were made to the constitution which 
appears elsewhere in this issue. One of the articles 
of the revised constitution which should interest us 
particularly refers to the wearing of the M upon col- 



62 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lege sweaters and caps. A printed certificate signed 
by the secretary of the athletic board will be sent to 
each man entitled to this privilege. The M which is 
to be worn presents a much better appearance than the 
definite letters formerly used. Now that this matter is 
in shape we hope to see those who can wear college 
sweaters do so. The scarcity of college sweaters has 
often been remarked upon heretofore and by some it 
has been taken as a sign of a lack of spirit. Consider- 
ing the successes of the college in athletics this fall we 
feel that there is certainly an abundance of enthusi- 
asm and college spirit in this direction at least. We 
have this fall brought honor to our college and placed 
her standard where it will be seen and respected by 
all. Let us now take a pride in wearing the colors 
which arg certain to command respect. 



We are soon to receive a slight addittion to our 
numbers by the coming of the winter course men who 
are to be with us for a short time for the purpose of 
grasping the rudimentary principles which will enable 
them to attain greater success in that particular branch 
of agriculture in which they are engaged. Whether 
they be experienced or inexperienced these men will 
all be greatly benefitted by the instruction which they 
will receive during their short stay here this winter. 
Our short v/inter courses are capable of making great 
changes in the farming class if the farmers can only 
be brought to see their advantages. At present how- 
ever the comparatively small numbers that have taken 
this course would seem to indicate that such a course 
was not called for by the agricultural population. 
This is not the case however. The farming class are 
as a rule slow to see the benefits of a new project 
but when they once realize that benefits do really 
exist, none are more certain than they to take advan- 
tage of them. It is more than a mere possibility that 
as our winter course becomes better appreciated, it 
will be one of our best methods of advertising the 
college. 



A FEW days ago the manager of the track team 
addressed the college, on the needs of his association, 
and a tax of one dollar was levied on the college. 
The object for which the money is to be spent is the 
increasing of the facilities of our Gymnasium and 
truly it is a worthy object. If we are to turn out some 



good track men next spring, it is necessary that they 
keep in trim during the winter. As things are now 
there is no apparatus, no course to run, absolutely 
nothing to induce men to take needful exercise. 
The Athletic Association proposes to place in the 
Drill Hall, a running track, which shall serve every 
need along that line, more mats and all the apparatus 
now existing is to be overhauled and repaired. They 
are to heat the place and in every way make it a fit 
place for a man to take exercise. The idea to run an 
interclass meet or meets this winter seems a very 
feasible one, provided the track is placed, or to put it 
more pointedly, provided the students, see fit to assure 
this call upon their pocket-books. In past years 
no difficulty was experienced in interesting the 
students in indoor meets and to-day with our added 
facilities and our chances for a Basket Ball Tourna- 
ment we should arouse both class and College spirit. 
If we are to send a team to Worcester it is imper- 
ative, that, v/e give our men the best possible training, 
and if we also obtain the Trinity meet, we ought to 
be willing to sacrifice both time and money to the 
glory of our Alma Mater. 



LESTON'S THANKSGIVING DINNER. 

Harry Leston strode across the campus and down 
the street toward his fraternity house in a rather pre- 
occupied way. It was the day before -Thanksgiving 
and he was thinking of home. 

"Just my luck," he grumbled, half aloud, half to 
himself, " only two days off for Thanksgiving, and 
all my cuts gone too. How do they suppose a man's 
going to Pennsylvania and back in that time ? Why, 
I couldn't even get started. Don't see why on earth 
they call it a holiday at all ; fellows that live round 
here won't more than get home before they'll have to 
turn around and come back. Gives the Profs, a day 
off though, so it doesn't matter whether it suits any- 
body else or not. Well, all there is about it I've got 
to stay here. Nice Thanksgiving it will be too ; noth- 
ing going on — " 

" Please give me some money. I'm cold and 
hungry." 

Leston gave a sort of jump and looked around. 
" Hello, what's all this?" he muttered. 

Just in front of him stood a little girl of perhaps 
seven years. She was thinly-clad and bare-footed. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



63 



Her little limbs were blue with cold and she was cry- 
ing as if her heart would break. 

•• Poor little girl !" said Leston, softly, forgetting 
his own troubles in an instant. " You must be 
nearly frozen, out this cold day. Where do you live, 
anyhow ? 

" I-live-over-there," she sobbed, pointing to a house 
which Leston did not remember ever having seen 
before. In fact, in his abstraction, he had strayed 
from his path, and was now in an unfamiliar quarter 
of the city. The house was a modest little cottage 
with a rather thrifty air. ' ' A pretty good house for 
beggars ; they may be just hard-up for a week or so, 
though," he thought. " Well, let's go and see how 
things are," he said stooping to take the child up in 
his arms. 

" No-o, I don't want to. I'm a little beggar-girl and 
you must give me some money and then go along, the 
way they do in the stories." 

Just then the door of the house opened, and a voice 
called, " Marion 1 Marion 1" 

"0 dear, there's mamma calling me now. I don't 
want to go in. I want to be a little beggar-girl," but 
off she went as fast as her little legs would carry her. 
Leston was sorely perplexed. He knew nothing what- 
ever about children, and did not profess to understand 
them. It was very singular that there was such a 
case of poverty in so prosperous a section, but what 
other explanation could there be. The child had 
evidently slipped away ; perhaps the mother was too 
proud to make known her destitution. He went to 
his room determined to aid the stricken family. 

About an hour later he jumped up from his desk^ 
shouting, " I've got it 1 A Thanksgiving spread's the 
thing 1" 

" Hold on, there, Harry ! Don't joggle the furniture 
like that," mildly remonstrated his room-mate. 
"What in thunder's the matter with you anyhow ?" 

" Excuse me. Billy. I forgot all about you. You're 
not on to my scheme yet, are you ?" 

" Hardly. I'm not a mind-reader. You come in 
here, throw down your books, say just nothing at all, 
suddenly bounce up, dance around and yell like a tribe 
of Mohawks on the war-path, and then expect me to 
know what it's all about." 

" Well, keep cool, and I'll tell you. When I came 
down just now, I went off on Mason street where I 
saw a girl " — 



" A girl? I might have guessed it. But go on." 

" O keep still, will you ? It was a little girl five or 
ten or so years old, and she was out begging. She 
was bare-headed and bare-footed and frozen about to 
death." 

" How romantic 1 Did you do the ' chivalrous 
rescuer' act ?" 

•' I was going to take her home when just then 
someone called to her and she ran off out of sight. I 
know where she lives though and I'm going to help 
the family." 

" What will you do ? Take up a collection ?" 

'• I'm going to give them a bang-up Thanksgiving 
dinner and you're going to help me." 

•' Oh. I am, am I ? You're sure to make a mess 
of it. Well, I've been mixed up in all your infernal 
schemes so far ; guess I might as well become philan- 
thropist pro tern too. Only remember that the scrape 
is yours and you've got to stand the consequence. 
Lead on, O Spartacus." 

" Well, I'm going to order the things brought up 
here this afternoon and to-night we'll take them down 
and leave them." 

" Why don't you have them left at the house to 
start with ? You don't suppose I'm going to lug 100 
pound turkeys all over the city at midnight, I hope." 

" I don't know the name of the family or the num- 
ber of the house, so I can't send it very well. And 
then I want to see what the folks will do when they 
get the stuff. There isn't any other way. Be ready 
at eight," 

At half-past eight the two stood near the house, 
their precious baskets close at hand. 

" Tell you what we'll do. We'll set the things on 
the piazza, ring the bell and climb up on the piazza 
roof. Then we'll hear every word they say," whis_ 
pered Leston. 

All went well till Leston tried to climb on the roof, 
when a piece of the lattice-work gave way throwing 
him to the ground, and dragging after him the faithful 
Billy. At the same moment the door opened, a man 
rushed out and pounced upon them. They were in no 
condition to offer resistance, and in a twinkling of an 
eye he had dragged them into the hall. 

"Well, gentlemen," said he, " I think an explana- 
tion of your extraordinary actions would be entirely in 
order. What were you doing on that roof?" 



64 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Leston began to stammer out an incoherent expla- 
nation. 

" My daughter out on the street begging? That's 
likely. No use in lying, gentlemen. It's my idea 
you are full-fledged burglars. 1 have sent for a police- 
man and as soon as he comes he will take you into 
custody." 

The matter was getting serious. Evidently there 
was some stupendous mistake. This man did not 
look as if he was in a famishing condition. Suddenly 
a soft voice said, '• Why, it's Mr. Leston and Mr. 
Kendall." They looked up to see that two ladies had 
just entered, and horror of horrors 1 the younger was 
Miss Dorothy Wilbur, whom they had met but the 
Sunday before. 

" I am astonished that you should be acquainted 
with such rascals," said her father, testily. " They 
were trying to break into the house." 

Leston again tried to explain. 

"Oh, I know what you mean," said Dorothy. " You 
must have seen Marion this afternoon. I read her a 
story of a little girl in New York who had to beg and 
she was much interested. When no one was watch- 
ing her, she slipped out of doors. She was very indig- 
nant when she was brought in and I remember now 
that she said she was playing * beggar-girl' We were 
ever so shocked when we found it out, but we never 
dreamed anyone would be deceived." 

" Unfortunately, she neglected to inform me she 
was only 'playing.' I thought she was in sober 
earnest." 

" So that accounts for the generous donation of 
eatables which you left for us. 1 begin to understand," 
said Mr. Wilbur, in much better humor. 

A few more explanations set everything right again. 

" But have you made any definite plans for to- 
morrow?" asked Mrs. Wilbur as the would-be philan- 
thropists took their leave. 

" Practically none," was the reply. 

" Then it seems to me that inasmuch as you have 
been so kind as to furnish a dinner for us, you should 
by all means come and enjoy it." 

And despite Leston's rather feeble objections it 
was so decided. The dinner was a complete success, 
little Marion coming in for much praise from Leston 
for her realistic acting. It is noteworthy that this was 
but one of many such Thanksgivings. It is even 



hinted in fact that Leston is soon to undertake to pro- 
vide dinners permanently for a certain member of the 
family, but this report may be premature. It is cer- 
tain, however, that he regards his first benevolence as 
the one successful bit of charity he has ever done. 

Impr^SSioBis of an Idler. 

Next Thursday the Idler will not be too busy to be 
thankful for the multitude of good things which fall 
to his lot and even when he rises up from his Thanks- 
giving dinner with a feeling of satiety he will not be 
inclined to think too severely of his usual table de 
hote. Perhaps during the dismal hours of the night 
as he lays awake and sees visions of featherless fowls 
forming in battle array over him, he will be even 
thankful that he is not called upon often to vindicate his 
ability as an epicure. But all these things will not in 
the least detract from the pleasure that he will take in 
being back again at the old homestead and meeting 
kith and kin assembled there to celebrate once more 
the annual Thanksgiving. But of them all the Idler 
will laugh the loudest, sing the merriest, and render 
thanks the most sincerely. And when the time arrives 
for him to return again to college, notwithstanding 
his proverbial indolence and forgetfulness the Idler 
will make no mistake about being on time. For he 
has recently become possessed of conscientious 
scruples against cutting and he has also learned that 
all manner of persecutions are in store for the delin- 
quent celebrator. Whether this be true or not con- 
cerns the Idler but little as he believes in taking 
things in their natural order and has no desire for a 
Christmas vacation at Thanksgiving. 

A short time ago the Idler witnessed a most remark- 
able game of football. He had been informed that a 
game between the freshmen and sophomores was to 
be played and at the appointed' time he joined the 
group of spectators upon the campus and prepared 
to witness a sight such as he had not seen since his 
own far off freshman days. As the sophomore team 
rushed out upon the gridiron he felt his heart swell 
with college pride and he thought that there surely was 
a team that needed no outside aid in order to do its- 
self credit. A moment later he was aroused from 
his reflections by the freshman team who presented 
an appearance not one whit inferior to the first. He 



AGGIE LIFE. 



65 



then awaited with growing interest a fair contest. 
Great was his disgust however to see it begin with 
both teams coached by a number of varsity players 
all of whom were sufficiently acquainted with football 
to know that their actions were not only contrary to 
the rules but decidedly unfair to both teams, Much 
as the Idler delights in a good game of football this 
kind of a game was such a shock to his sensibilities 
that he could not induce himself to remain and see its 
conclusion. 



,\l 



— The K. K. K. held a social meeting one evening 
last week. A good time is reported. 

— The next lecture in the Union lecture course is 
by Rev. Russell H. Conwell on Dec. 6. 

— Prof. Levi Stockbridge and wife leave Amherst 
on Dec. 1 to spend the winter in Florida. 

— The dancing class has been organized and are 
receiving two lessons a week. Prof. A. X. Petit is in 
charge. 

*^— A running track is to be laid in the drill-hall and 
considerable new gymnasium apparatus is to be 
bought. 

— Frost, 1900, and Lewis, 1902, are singing in the 
choir at the Baptist church. C. M. Walker, '99, is 
organist. 

— H. M. Cheever, 1903, has been laid up for some 
time with a sprained ankle received in a practice foot- 
ball game. 

— A. F. Frost, 1900, assisted in the entertainment 
held in connection with the harvest supper at Leverett 
on Nov. 17. 

— The sophomore football team defeated the Sun- 
derland A. A. by a score of 22 to on Wednesday, 
Nov. 22, at Sunderland. 

— The first car over the new Northampton & 
Amherst electric road was run last week. It was an 
old horse car and made one trip only. 

— The Agricultural division of the senior class will 
take a trip through the eastern part of the state during 
this week. They intend to visit some of the largest 
farms in Northboro and Framingham for the purpose 
of seeing agriculture in its practical applicatiorir 



— A large delegation from Aggie attended the pre- 
sentation of " The Little Minister " in Northampton 
by Maude Adams on the 15th of the month. 

— Many of the students watched for the meteor 
showers expected on the 14th and 15th of the month, 
but even our most experienced star-gazer fails to 
report having seen one. 

• — The usual Thanksgiving recess, extending from 
Wednesday noon preceding Thanksgiving-day till the 
following Tuesday morning, has been granted. Mon- 
day's exercises were held on Saturday, Nov. 25. 

— P. C. Brooks, 1901, as a delegate from the 
local chapter, attended the annual fall reunion and 
banquet of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity held at 
Hotel St. Denis, N. Y. city, Friday evening, Nov. 17. 

— The Pittsfield Bicycle club football team played 
the Pittsfield Y. M. C. A. team on Saturday, Nov. 25. 
O'Hearn, 1903, played for the Bicycle club, and Hal- 
ligan, Cooke and Gamv/ell played for the Y. M. G. A. 

— Rev. Horace Wellington, the father of Dr. G. 
Wellington, died at his home in Roxbury on Nov. 20. 
The body was brought to Amherst. Funeral services 
were held at the home of Dr. Wellington on Amity 
street on Thursday afternoon, Nov. 23. 

— A special class in Ghemistry has been organized, 
as in past years, and has commenced work investi- 
gating questions concerning Ghemistry in its practical 
relation to manufactures. The course is becoming 
quite popular. Any student of any class, who is inter- 
ested in Ghemistry, may join. 

— On the evening of Nov. 20, the Ghemical Glub 
listened to an interesting paper by Mr. F. W. Mossman, 
'90, entitled " Some phases of the Dairy Question." 
Mr. Mossman proved himself a master of the subject, 
to which he has devoted years of work- as instructor, 
investigator and practical dairyman. 

— It is expected that Prof. R. S. Lull will address 
the college in the near future on his recent V/estern 
trip. Prof. Lull accompanied a scientific expedition 
sent out by the American Museum of Natural History 
under the charge of Prof. Osborn to the Bad Lands of 
Wyoming. The lecture will be illustrated. Prof. 
Lull will exhibit some views taken by himself of the 
fossil remains found by the expedition and also some 
rare views loaned by Prof. Osborn that have never 
been exhibited before. The date of the lecture has 
not been announced. 



% 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The Athletic Board, at a meeting held on Friday 
last, adopted a new set of rules in regard to the quali- 
fications necessary to make a man eligible to wear 
the college sweater. These rules will be published 
elsewhere. They also adopted as the college sweater 
a maroon sweater with a white letter M. The 
sweaters, which the students have presented to the 
football team, are of this style. The football team 
are also equipped with new coHege caps. This cap is 
maroon with a white M and a small leather oval 
representing a football. The men eligible to wear the 
sweater and cap with the letter for their work this fall 
are: Halligan, Stanley, Canto. Cooke, Gamwell, 
Chickering, Barry, Rogers, Whitman, Pierson 
Bridgeforth, Paul, Bodfish, O'Hearn and Snell. 

— The freshman-sophomore football game played 
upon the campus on Friday afternoon Nov. 17 proved 
to be full of excitement and sensation. The two 
teams were very equally matched. Each team had 
two 'varsity players and both teams have practiced 
hard and have played a number of games with out- 
side teams to prepare them for this final meet. From 
the conversation before the game it appeared as if 
both teams were confident of winning, it is certain that 
each was determined to run up a score on the other 
if possible. The battle was hard and well contested. 
Gains were slow and small and dearly earned. The 
sophomores excelled in end plays and in the second 
half, in particular, succeeded in gaining considerable 
ground. The freshmen made desperate plunges 
through the line and made considerable distance a 
number of times. The ball remained near the center 
of the field during the greater part of the game. The 
sophomore's goal was hardly in danger at all during 
the game and the freshman's only twice, once during 
the first half when the ball reached the 15-yard line 
and in the second half when Paul touched it down 
after hard and continued rushing. The score was 5 
to in favor of 1902. 



COMMUNICATION. 

GoTTiNGEN, Germany, Oct. 23, 1899. 
To THE Editor of the Aggie Life. 

My Dear Sir. — On Oct. 11,1 left Miinster for Got- 
tingen by way of Cassel, the former capital of Kur- 
hessen and, at present, a favored summer residence 
of the Imperial household. 



Cassel is one of the most attractive cities in Cen- 
tral Germany. It was here that Jerome Napoleon, 
the youngest brother of the first Emperor Napoleon, 
spent for a brief period, an uneventful life as king of 
Westphalia. Also the late emperor, Louis Napoleon 
III was held for some time, as prisoner of war, after 
the battle of Sedan. 

I need not state that the sight of Gottingen, after 
forty years absence, called forth very vividly many 
pleasant recollections of my seven years' life, as a 
student and teacher, in that venerable and reputed 
seat of learning. Time has dealt kindly with Gottin- 
gen, and the best proofs of the fostering care of the 
government are everywhere visible. The changes 
and improvements are, however, more conspicuous in 
the suburbs of the city outside of the wall. 

Most pleasing to me personally, was the observa- 
tion of the life-sized bronze statues of two of my most 
deserving and beloved teachers in Chemistry and 
Physics, Frederick Wohler and Wilhelm Weber, a 
very appropriate tribute to two lives disinterestedly 
spent in the service of their respective sciences. The 
statue of Frederick Wdhler stands alone in pleasant 
surroundings outside of the Wecuder door, in front of 
the new, handsome auditorium, and that of Weber 
occupies a prominent place near the Geismar door. 
The Weber monument includes a representation of 
his great co-laborer in the investigation of earth mag- 
netism, and the relations of electric currents to mag- 
netic forces. Gans is very tastefully represented in a 
sitting position, apparently listening to a discussion of 
Weber, who stands by his side, holding a wire in his 
hand coming from an electrical apparatus. 

As the university departments are as a rule closed 
during the vacation, which extends to the end of Octo- 
ber, I have turned my attentions, thus far, mainly to 
the visiting of the chemical laboratories of the Univer- 
sity and to several excursions to beet-sugar factories 
and beet-raising farms in the vicinity of Gottingen. 
The chemical laboratories are located, in the major- 
ity of cases, in new, substantial buildings which are 
quite spacious, and apparently well equipped. 

In passing over the collections of inorganic and 
organic chemical preparations, my attention was 
repeatedly called to samples familiar to me from the 
time when acting as assistant to Wohler. It seemed 
to give special satisfaction to the janitor of the insti- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



67 



tution, who served as a youthful janitor in my time, to 
point out to me specimens marked in my hand-writing. 

The residence of Wohler with its first floor still 
used as a chemical laboratory, has but very iittle 
changed ; it is occupied by his present successor, 
Professor Wallal, who studied some twenty years ago 
under Wohler. 

The cultivation of the sugar-beet roots, for sugar 
manufacture, is extensively carried on in adjoining 
territories and there are thousands of acres devoted to 
their cultivation, within half an hours ride from the 
city. One factory for beet sugar is located in one of 
the suburbs, and tv^o more within twenty minutes ride 
by railroad. One of these factories at Yorden, is 
reported to be the largest of its kind in Western 
Prussia. I had the pleasure of visiting both fields 
and factories in company with a graduate of the M. 
A. C, Mr. Robert Smith of Amherst, who served as 
a welcome guide. 

No one witnessing the whole operation, from the 
harvesting of the roots to the turning out of the sugar, 
can fail to recognize one of the most skillfully man- 
aged industries of the age ; far reaching in its benefi- 
cial influence on rational methods of agriculture, and 
the promotion of valuable branches of home indus- 
tries, I hope to have, at some future day, a chance 
to treat this subject more in detail before interested 
parties in the college. With best wishes. 

Yours very truly, 

C. A. GOESSMANN. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE MAS- 
SACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE ATHLETIC BOARD. 

Section i. 

Article 1. The Board shall have control of the 
athletic interests of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College and of any funds or income of any funds that 
may be intrusted to it for athletic purposes. 

Article 2. The Board shall have the power to raise 
and collect subscriptions and in other way to increase 
the athletic funds of the college. 

Article 3. The Board shall have advisory power 
in questions of intercollegiate athletic policy. 

Article 4. The Board shall appoint a resident sec- 
retary and treasurer who shall receive and deposit all 
moneys for athletic purposes, whether gate receipts. 



subscriptions, guarantees, or proceeds from benefit 
entertainments. 

Article 5. All contracts relating to athletic objects 
shall be made by the treasurer or by any authorized 
agent in the name of and with the approval of the 
board. 

SECTION II. 

Article 1 . The Board shall be composed of nine 
members, viz., the chief officer respectively of the 
base-ball, foot-ball and athletic clubs ; the latter shall 
include all field sports except base-ball and foot-ball ; 
three members of the faculty, and three of the 
alumni of the collega, one of whom shall be a resi- 
dent alumnus who shall also be secretary and treasurer 
of the board. 

Article 2, The chief officer of each of the above 
named associations shall become a member of the 
board by virtue of his office and his membership shall 
cease upon the expiration of his term of office. 

Article 3. The President of the College, at the 
commencement of the fall term of each year, shall 
appoint three members of the board from the faculty. 
The President shall have power to fill vacancies 
occurring among the faculty members of the board. 

Article 4. The three alumni members shall be 
elected as follows : 

One by the student body at a mass meeting at the 
commencement of the fall term of each year. 

One by the faculty at their first meeting after the 
commencement of the fall term. 

One by the associate alumni at their commence- 
ment meeting. 

Article 5. The term of office of members of the 
board shall be one year or until their successors are 
chosen. 

SECTION III. 

The board shall have power to fill all vacancies 
occuring in the board not already provided for in 
Article 3, Section II. Members thus appointed shall 
hold off ice for the unexpired term of their predecessors. 

SECTION IV. 

Article 1. The board shall have the power to 
frame its by-laws governing time, place and conduct 
of meeting and its procedure in matters brought to it 
for action. 

Article 2. As soon as possible after the com- 



68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



mencement of the fall term, the board shall be called 
together by the senior faculty member for the purpose 
of organizing and electing a secretary and treasurer 
from the alumni members of the board. 

Article 3. Amendments may by made to this con- 
stitution when proposed by two thirds of the board 
members and ratified at a college mass meeting. 

BY-LAWS. 
Officers and their Duties, 
section i. 
The officers of the board shall be a President, Vice- 
President, a Secretary and Treasurer, and an execu- 
tive committee consisting of five members, viz., a 
faculty member of the board, the secretary and treas- 
urer of the board, and the undergraduate members of 
the board. 

SECTION II. 

The election of officers shall be by ballot at the 
first meeting of the board after the commencement 
of the fall term. 

Article 2. The officers shall hold terms for one 
year. 

SECTION III. 

At the first meeting of the board after the com- 
mencement of the fall term an auditor shall be elected 
who shall be a member of the board but hold no other 
office in the board, and who shall once In a year audit 
the accounts of the treasurer and report to the board. 

SECTION IV. 

Article 1. The duties of the President shall be to 
call and preside at all meeting of the board. 

Article 2. The duties of the Vice-President shall 
be to perform the duties of the President in his absence 
or disability. 

Article 3. The duties of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer shall be to issue by letter the call for all meetings 
of the board. He shall keep an accurate record of all 
the votes and other doings of the board, in a book pro- 
vided for the purpose, in which shall also be written 
the constitution and by-laws of the board. He shall 
record the place, time, score and expense of all 
official games and contests. He shall notify the chair- 
man of each committee chosen by the board of his 
appointment and each individual of any duty assigned 
hinn by the board. 



He shall also receive and account for all the money 
of the board in whatever way placed in his hands. 
He shall pay out money for all general purposes only 
on the written order of the executive committee. He 
shall pay out money for the expenses of the single 
associations only upon the written order of the mana- 
ger of that association. All of his accounts shall be 
kept in a book prepared for the purpose, which shall 
be open for inspection at any time to the members of 
the board. 

Article 4. The duties of the executive committee 
shall be to act upon all questions which shall require 
attention between the meetings of the board. 
They shall submit all such actions for approval to the 
board at its next meeting. In all questions of general 
interest the entire committee shall act, the under- 
graduate members, however, having but one vote. 
On questions concerning the affairs of any single asso- 
ciation, the committee shall consist of the faculty 
member, the treasurer of the board and the manager 
of the association concerned. 

SECTION V. 

The executive committee shall have the control of 
the field and its appurtenances between meetings of 
the board. They may also appoint a director to have 
immediate charge of the field. 

MEETINGS. 

SECTION VI. 

The board shall hold one regular meeting each 
year as provided by the constitution. A special meet- 
ing mey be called at any time by the President and 
two other members provided notice in writing be 
given to each of the members. 

SECTION VII. 

Five members of the board shall constitute a quo- 
rum for transaction of business provided there be at 
least one representative from the ■ faculty, alumni and 
undergraduates. 

SECTION VIII. 

These by-laws may be added to, altered, amended 
or repealed by a two-thirds vote of the members 
present at any regular meeting, or special meeting 
called for that purpose, provided that the addition, 
alteration, amendment or repeal is left with the sec- 
retary and notice thereof given to each member one 
week at least before said meeting. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



69 



DUTIES OF MANAGERS. 

SECTION IX. 

Article 1. No manager shall schedule any game 
or contest in which a money guarantee is to be paid 
or received, or make any contract for coaching, sup- 
plies, or any object, or contract debts in any way to a 
greater extent than ten dollars, ($10.00), except with 
the approval of the treasurer of the board. 

Article 2. No money shall be raised or supplies 
ordered for any association until all previous debts of 
all the associations have been paid in full. This shall 
not, however, be so construed as to prevent the sched- 
uling of games. 

Article 3. The manager of each association shall 
be responsible for the collection of all subscriptions 
and taxes made for the benefit of his association. 

SECTION X. 

Each manager shall make his returns to the treas- 
urer within three days after a home event or on his 
return from a trip. 

SECTION XI. 

Each manager, as early as possible in the season, 
shall submit his schedule of games to the board for 
approval ; and no game which requires the absence of 
any student from college duties shall be subsequently 
scheduled except with the approval of the board or its 
executive committee. 

EXCUSES FOR ABSENCE. 

SECTION XII. 

In the case of any approved game or contest neces- 
sitating the absence of the members of a team from 
college duties, the secretary of the board shall, not 
later than the day before such game, give to the pres- 
ident of the college an official list of the members of 
the team, together with a statement as to the absence 
necessary. This shall be considered a sufficient ex- 
cuse for such absence but further than this no respon- 
sibility for absences will be assumed by the board. 

GENERAL RULES. 
Rule 1 . 
No person shall be a member of any team who is 
not an accredited member of the college as deter- 
mined by the books of the registrar. 



Rule 2. 

Article 1 . The wearing of the college monogram 
upon cap or sweater shall be considered a special 
privilege and restricted as follows : In baseball and 
football, men who have taken part in at least three 
regular games in the same season. In track athletics, 
men who have taken at least three points in a dual 
meet or one point where more than two teams are 
engaged. Also managers and captains of baseball, 
football, and track teams by virtue of their office. 

Article 2. At the close of each athletic season the 
secretary of the board shall make a correct list of all 
men who have qualified in this respect during the sea- 
son and notify each in writing of his qualifications, 
and no man shall be entitled to display the college 
monogram upon his person until he has received such 
written notification. 

Article 3. The college sweater shall be of a solid 
maroon color bearing the single letter " M " in white, 
The cap shall be of the same design but with such 
additional symbols for the different teams as may be 
agreed upon. 

Rule 3.. 

The manager of each base ball, foot ball, and ath- 
letic team shall see that an official photograph be 
taken of his team. Each team shall include all men 
who have taken part in any regular game or contest 
of that team and all who have gone to any out of town 
game as regular substitutes. A copy of this photo- 
graph, suitably framed, shall be presented to the col- 
lege by the association. 

Rule 4. 

Article 1. The privilege of placing its numerals 
upon the college athletic banner shall belong each 
year to that class whose members win the largest 
total of points in all the regular inter-class meets held 
during the year. No class shall do this, however, 
without the authority of the athletic board, and it shall 
be each year the duty of the secretary of the board to 
notify in writing the secretary of the successful class, 
as soon as possible after the last meet has been held. 

Article 2. The board shall assume the custody of 
all banners, emblems, or trophies won by or presented 
to the athletic teams of the college, in so far as they 
are not the property of individuals. 



70 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Rule 5. 

Article I . The secretary of the board shall keep a 
list of the records of the college infield and track ath- 
letics, beginning with the list given in the Index pub- 
lished in 1899. 

Article 2. No performance where record is of tinne 
shall be accepted unless made on a measured track 
and timed by competent timers who guarantee the 
accuracy of their watches. Applications for the grant- 
ing of a record of time must be presented to the sec- 
retary of the athletic board within ten days from the 
time of the performance and must contain the declar- 
ations of three timers, two finish judges, the starter 
and referee, as to the genuineness of the record. In 
the hurdle events at least seven hurdles, including the 
first and last, must be left standing. Applications for 
the granting of a record of distance or height must be 
made within ten days from the time of the perform- 
ance and must contain the declarations of two meas- 
urers and one field judge as to the genuineness of the 
record. 

Article 3. No record shall be accepted unless 
made in competition. 



AN ANCIENT FEAST. 

In t' olden time ere tliis bright land 
Was given to the white nrian's hand ; 
Where grim and gloomy forests stand 
There sat a boist'rous, feasting band. 

Across the seas the Norsemen bold, 
Through surging seas that southward rolled 
From farther north, through arctic cold 
Had steered their barks to Britain old. 

And Vortigern had planned a night 
When fagots gave a ruddy light. 
And everything was gleaming bright, 
And made a fair and lovely sight. 

To entertain the Norseman host, 
And try by aid of steaming roast, 
And flagons full, and merry toasts 
To win that sturdy Norsemen host. 

And so they sat around the board 
And everything that had been stored 
For many days, was hacked and gored 
To feed that hungry merry horde. 

(And fair Rowena filled the cup 
The helpless Briton drank it up.) 

And in his heart there burned a flame 
For love on him had made its claim. 
Of that old feast, O, whence the fame ? 
Why, in Rowena's pretty name. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

General Physiology hy Max Verworn, M. D., Ph. D., 
a translation from the German by Prof. Frederick S. 
Lee of Columbia University. The author believes 
that the true scope of general physiology should ex- 
tend only to those vital phenomina that are common 
to all organisms. Hence the book deals only with 
cell physiology applicable to both plants and animals. 
Modern physiology constantly extends its inquires to 
the cell — the elementary substratum of all life that 
exists upon the earth's surface. General Physiology is 
a subject which has not occupied its proper position 
in respect to Biology. On the later subject and its 
divisions an enormous amount of literature has been 
produced while the former subject on the contrary has 
been sadly neglected. Verworn renders therefore a 
substantial service in his book by directing attention 
rightly, and at the same time presenting so many 
aspects of the subject in so comprehensive a manner 
as to render more easy further researches in this 
neglected branch of Biological science. The author's 
material for the production of this work is scattered 
in a great variety of memoirs a complete list of which 
is appended to the latter part of the book. This list is 
valuable to one wishing to continue the study more in 
details. The collation of many fa::ts, brought into 
mutual relation for the first time is one of the main 
features of the book. The illustrations numbering 
nearly 200 are of a high order and especially com- 
mendable. The subjects of the chapters are as fol- 
lows : Aims and Methods of Physiological Research, 
Living Substances, Elementary Vital Phenomina, 
General Condition of Life, Stimuli and their Actions 
and the Mechanism of Life. All these themes the 
author handles firmly and successfully and in a man- 
ner showing his familiarity with the subject. The 
book is not a new one for it was first published in the 
German language in 1895 and since then has been 
translated into several different languages. This, 
however, is the first English translation and its import- 
ance lies in the fact that the material in the book is 
now more easily accessible to the greater part of the 
English speaking scientists. 

We have just recieved a copy of the Report of 
Government Entomologist of Cape of Good Hope. The 
author is C. P. Lounsbury '94. The report is a sum- 
mary of his work and investigations during the past 



AGGIE LIFE. 



71 



year and contains many articles of practical import- 
ance to the " tillers of the soil" and fruit growers of 
that section. We note that the scale insects, there 
as elsewhere, recieve their share of attention from the 
economic entomologists. The methods of destroying 
these pests by the fumigation method is fully described 
in this report. 



^^Char^^es- 



We regret that it is necessary for us to remind the 
Exchange editor of the Chips that the Aggie Life is 
not a high school paper, but the representative publi- 
cation of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

We have received a communication from the 
Phoenix informing us that it will be necessary to sus- 
pend the publication of this paper. We hope that 
financial conditions, if that be the trouble, will soon 
become favorable for resumption ; or if lack of spirit 
be the cause of suspension that interest will soon 
revive. 

" Ha'f th' sum, ye injine driver, ye chain gang ye. 
Whoi, Oi kin make more money 'n your proice ivery 
year a' raisin' av bull frogs." 

" Seein' me name's McGann, Oi thought loikely ye 
hod mistakln th' house." 

" Oim a' comin' t' that. They don't know ye 
represint the road. This is th' shortest road fur th' 
railway, an' th' chapest. In two hours Oi kin let ivery 
• phroperty holder, tin moiles each way, know what ye 
want th' Ian' fur, an' ye'll hov to pay ivery mither's 
son av thim double the worth av their Ian', see ? Two 
thousan' buys me secrecy es m\\ es me Ian'. Ither- 
wise they hears about 't. How es't now ?" 

" McGann, keep mum, savvy?" 

" It's a go, shake." 

" That Irishman ought to be in the Legislature, 
that's what." 

The above quotations are extracts from a realistic 
story in the Polytechnic entitled "A Good Day's 
Work," which is well worth reading. Brian McDoughl 
is also a good story. It is a sad, romantic tale of 
Northern Ireland. 

From the Academy: The word "kiss" maybe 
parsed as follows : Kiss is a conjunction, because it 
connects ; it's a verb, because it signifies to act and 



to be acted upon ; it is a preposition, because it shows 
that the person kissed is no relation ; it is an interjec- 
tion (at least it sounds like one), and it is a pronoun, 
because she always stands for the noun. It is also a 
noun because it is the name of the osculatory action — 
both common and proper ; second person, necessarily ; 
plural number, because there is always more than one. 
In gender it' is masculine and feminine mixed. Fre- 
quently the case is governed by circumstances and 
light, according to rule one : " If he smite you on the 
cheek turn the other also." It should always begin 
with a capital letter, be often repeated, continued as 
long as possible, and ended with a period. Kiss can 
be conjugated, but should never be declined. 

The writer of " A Boarding School Mystery " in 
the Gazette has succeeded in a success which only a 
lively imagination could insure in a story of that 
character. 



71.— George H. Tucker died on Oct. 1st, 1899, 
at Spring Creek, Penn. 

'78. — Sanford D. Foot, secretary of the Kearney 
& Foot Co. manufacturers of files and rasps, with 
works at Paterson, N. J. 

'80. — George A. Ripley, clerk. Prospect House, 
Rutland. 

'82. — Francis S. Allen, married Helena Victoria 
Peck at Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 29, 1899. 

Ex-'82. — S. J. Holmes, treasurer and general 
manager of the Montclair Realty Co., Montclair, N. J. 

'90. — Dwight W. Dickinson, dentist, 431 Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass., and also instructor 
in the Harvard Dental School. 

'90. — On January 1st, 1899, Chas. H. Jones was 
promoted from position of Assistant Chemist to that t- 
of Head Chemist at Agricultural Experiment station, 
Burlington, Vt. 

'90. — F. J. Smith has accepted a position with 
Bowker Fertilizer Company, Elizabeth, N. J., and has 
charge of the department of Insecticides. 

'93.— C. A. Smith is with N. B. Blackstone Com- 
pany, dealers in dry goods, Los Angeles, Cal. 



t- 



72 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'94. — I. C. Greene, of Green Bros., breeders of 
choice breeding stock in Black Minorcas, Partridge 
Cociiins, R. C. Brown Leghorns, White Wyandottes 
and Dark Brahams, has removed to 222 Pleasant St., 
Leominster, Mass., P. O. Box 703. Mr. Greene is 
superintendent of the Leominster Division, Greene & 
Sheddon Ice Co. 

'94. — Chas. P. Lounsbury sends The Life the 
Annual Report of Government Entomologist of Cape 
of Good Hope, of which mention is made elsewhere, 
and also a number of bulletins which he has published 
during the past year. The size of the bulletin varies 
from two to twenty pages and considerable labor must 
have been involved in their preparation. Mr. Louns- 
bury has his headquarters at Cape Town. 

'94.-^A. H. Kirkland has charge of the field 
department of Gypsy Moth Commission during the 
leave of absence of E. H. Forbush. Address, Mai- 
den, Mass. 

'95. — A. F. Burgess is getting along nicely and 
likes his work very much as instructor in Entomology 
at the University of Illinois. Address, 936 West 
Illinois St., Urbana, 111. 

'95. — Frank L. Warren (M. D., University of 
Pennsylvania, '99.) Doctor, Bridgewater, Mass. 

'98. — George H. Wright has removed to 44 Fort 
Green Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ex-'98. — W. Kinsman, superintendent Hay Slope 
Farm, Ipswich, Mass. 

Ex-'99. — Howard S. Courtney in business as flo- 
rist, at Nyack, N. Y. 

Ex-'99. — John R. Dutcher in business as florist, at 
Nyack, N. Y. 

'99. — H. E. Maynard has entered the junior class, 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Address, 20 Daton 
street, Worcester, Mass. 

'99. — S. E. Smith recently visited friends at the 
college. Glad to hear of the interest and the active 
part he is taking in the affairs of his native town. 
What is a college education for, if it is not to prepare 
a young man for such work. 

Owing to an error in printing the two last above 
mentioned items were entered under Ex-'90 in the 
last issue of the Life. 



'99. — Dan A. Beaman, Instructor at Dr. Brown's 
Institution, Barre, Mass. 

Ex-'OO. — Wilber Otis, student at Harvard Uni- u 
versify. 

Ex-'OO. — W. R. Crowell, who entered the Junior 
class at Dartmouth College this fall, had little diffi- (■ 
culty in making the position of left tackle on the 
varsity foot ball team. 

Ex-'OO.— C. A. Crowell, Jr., student at Lawrence « 
Scientific School of Harvard University. 

Ex-'Ol. — A. R. Dorman has entered the freshman 
class of Columbia University and captain of the class 
foot ball team. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Retnember these suits ».t& pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Gleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders (or our line of books, or hand' 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHINQ CO.. 
134 Van Buren St. , Chicago. 



AMHa$t, Aa$$. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Secojtd door south of Post Office. 



niiiDiniiuiinaEuiiinniiiiuiiiiiiiiiiEisiiiiiitiuiiiuiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiuiig 



Is your exercise making? To make the hard | 
and supple kind, rub down after every spell § 
of exercising, "witb i 



Apo*ji>« 



I Ittones the nervoua system, prevents and | 

I removes stiffness and soreness, and is the | 

I best remedy known for sprains. In use for a 

I 90 years. Sold in two size bottles— 25 cents | 

3 and 50 cents. \ 

\ I. S. JOHNSON & CO., Boston, Mass. | 
BHiUiniiiUiifii9iniiniuiiiiUHiuiuiiiiiuuiiniu:iiiiiiiau3i)iiiuiiiiu 



TBAOHERS WANTED! 



ONION TEBCPS' BOEPIES OF PEHIGS. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pittsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York, -Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to he filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualiflecl facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. I'rincipals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHll^GTOfl, D. C, OF PITTSBUHG, Pfl. 







C. S. GA1ES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWJS^ D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien desired. 



\Ti 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St., 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

KEAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass- 



hQUAlL LlFii- 



Start ifi Basiness for YoaFself. 



SUCCESS ASSURED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



0, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. T^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 



BEHLER IN ST8YES BHB BHIE! 



AGENT FOE THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Stemn and Hot Water Heaters. 

Trfeplione 56-4. 



(Successor to W. W. Hnut) 
All kinds of 



HEATING, PLUIVIBINS AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY. 



All suits made in my own work-shops. 
Savings Bank Block, - Amheest, Mass. 



ffiassaehusetts flgrieultOFal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 



J 

And we beg to announce that we. usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information addi'ess, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGi£; LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATJl SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the stmlent trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HAL.I-. 
MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Bircli Beer and Ging«r 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



NOKTHAJIFTON, MASS. 



E. 3. mOKINOON, 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ----- AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours: 

9 TO 12 -A.- Ivd:., l-SO TO 5 !>. HAL. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

Hals, Caps, Gloves, Geats' Mimi\ 

FINE READf-MDE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



IPIEi-^Z^l^viE-^CIST. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered wlien desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OE 

XeXJEBEIS O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



g^Bepairing done while you wait,,Sj!i 
» THfENlX JtOW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AUD FEED STABLE 



T. I.. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT STRHHT, AMSJES8T, MASS, 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfieldrifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-Operati¥e Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establisliment. 



A.g;g:le> A^s^*^*^ 



H. Iv. OJK^JViSCEj »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

(r^srSA.TISFA.CTI01Sr Ca-XJA-HA-I-TTBEID. a^* 

Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. Schoql House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



^^Partnilis's pilMlB Oiitliftis.* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PfflCES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



S4 and 86 Franklin Street, - 



' BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B, KELTON. 



R. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



pofliTBY, mimm, m m oysters. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHfC STUDIO. 

Society, Class antl Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attisntion given to students. 

JV. J. SOHIIIvI-.'^^SeEJ, 

les Main Steeet, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephane connection. 



A^MS ?©»»«£' 




a^ Consider — if you can t eep the vet out 
^ of your rifle it wiU not rjwjnotfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 



baye Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. XJp-to-date lnfor» 



mation about powders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes. Quantities, how to 
load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed. 
Jacketed, softnosed, mushroom, etc.; 
trajectories, Telocities,penetratioas. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
, 1,000 other things, including many trade 
i secrets never before given to the public. 
\ Free if you will send stamps for postage to 
': The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



The M. N. Spear Book Store. 



ESTABLISHED FEFTT TEARS. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fajicy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

1= X3: o T o cs- IK ^^ :e= s: IE Z3 . 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always tlie lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cahivets, ^2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A.MMEMST, MASS. 



Hmberst Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRIOK, Manaobr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDEKTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



WE MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Eegilding done. 



EL. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. 



DEALER IN 



WIITGHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OP 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WAEE, &c. 
HOT AIE FUENACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATEE HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



The Jiofthampton M Store. 

I.. K. CHEW, Manager. 

Cor. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 

MASS. jlGRlCDLTUfiAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

EEUIT AND OENAMENTAL TEEES AND SHEUBS 

SMALL FEUITS AND PLANTS 

TKTTE to name, ALSO 

CUT FLOWEES AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PBICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 
PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 



AMHBRST, MASS. 



GLYNN, 



TAILOR. ^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OP TEIMMINGS. 



/Ibaesacbusette 

HQticultural 

College 

• OFFEIRS • 

1. A SHORT WINTER COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A POITR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST CrRABUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



0^1 



^yx^ , 



VS^J^ r\5,, 



J IDgc. 20, 1899 





, (t^'h'Ctua^c 







))L. X. 



NO. 7. 



FURIMISHINOS. 



CLOTHIISJO 

We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



AMHas-r, Aa$$, 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 
A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos — all the best brands 
All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DiiUG STORE. 









Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $J.^o. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $S-00. 



REIPAIRINO. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

In approved forms. 
PRICES RiaHl". 



GOLLEBE 
JEWELER 



COLLEIE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair departm.ent. 

j^-EYES FITTED FREE.ffiff 
By a graduate of Dk. Fosteb, Occulist. 




OOLXj-A-RS 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



HARRY CLARK, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 




VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. DECEMBER 20, 1899. 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass, Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 
GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 



ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN 
AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes, 
DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. 
LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. 



NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 
00, College Notes. 



'01, Ass't Business Manager. 
JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 
CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 
HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 



Terms: $1.00 per gear in advance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, . 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Pest Office as secend-class mail matter. 



rials. 



It has been suggested that a waiting station at the 
electric car track, where it is crossed by the botanic 
path, would be very convenient. A small attractive 
appearing booth might be placed here and would be 
greatly appreciated in stormy weather. The expense 
of erecting such a structure would be inconsiderable, 
and the benefits would easily justify such an expense. 
If we are not mistaken the matter was broached some 
time ago and we hope that it will now receive more 
serious consideration. 



a whole and thus uniformity secured. The college 
caps that have been ordered are of the same color as 
the sweater and have neat symbols of the different 
teams upon each side of the monogram. 



The new College sweaters that are worn by many 
are very becoming. Now that the list of those enti- 
tled to wear them has been published in the Index we 
hope to see a great many of them. It has been sug- 
gested by some that a smaller monogram be adopted 
and individual men have already sent for smaller let- 
ters for their sweaters. This smaller monogram has 
many things that would recommend it but if it is to 
be used at all it should be adopted by the College as 



On Dec. 15th the 1901 Index was placed before 
the public. As is customary with college annuals a 
considerable portion of this book has been devoted to 
the compilation of valuable statistics These statis- 
tics are worthy of particular commendation especially 
the revised alumni Directory which is the product of 
much time and labor. The art work is original and 
appropriate. In the literary department this Index is 
fully up to the standard of past years. The book is 
much larger than the usual size and is printed upon 
very heavy paper. In a large measure it is free from 
the " objectionnble " roasts " that have in past years 
been very prominent. Upon the whole the class can 
be congratulated upon the success of their efforts. If 
we were to offer any adverse criticism it might be 
that throughout the book there is perhaps a tendency 
on the part of the class toward self-emolument. This 
tendency, however, does not become very noticeable. 



74 



AGGIE LIFE. 



We earnestly advise alumni and otiiers to investigate 
tiie virtues and failings of the Index by purchasing a 
copy. 



FREE AID FOR THE PEOPLE. 

PREVENTION OF LOTS BY INJURIOUS INSECTS. 

The attacks of injurious insects probably cause the 
loss of several millions of dollars in Massachusetts 
alone each year. This has not always been the case, 
but insects are becoming more abundant and conse- 
quently more destructive. Much of this destruction, 
however, could be either in part or wholly prevented 
if the proper methods of treatment were made use of 
and that this is not more frequently done is very un- 
fortunate. It is probable that the reason for the ap- 
parent-negligence in this regard is due to ignorance as 
to whtit the insect is in each particular case and what 
to do to prevent its ravages. It is this very uncer- 
tainty which results in nothing being done in most 
cases. 

In order to provide this information for residents of 
the state, the Entomological division of the Hatch Ex- 
periment station at Amherst offers its services with- 
out charge to all who may desire them. In order to 
obtain this assistance, write to the Entomologist, 
Hatch Experiment Station at Amherst, Mass., de- 
scribing the trouble, and also if possible, send samples 
of the injury and the insect causing it, and attention 
will at once be given to the matter. 

As the Hatch Experiment Station of Massachu- 
setts is supported in part by State appropriation such 
a use of its facilities by the people of the State is not 
only justifiable but most desirable, for it was estab- 
lished for just that purpose, and no one who incurs 
loss by insect ravages can excuse himself for that loss 
except on the ground of ignorance that such assis- 
tance could be obtained. 



CHEMICAL CLUB. 

The last two meetings of the chemical club have 
been of especial interest. The first of these was ad- 
dressed by Mr. Mossman of the Experiment Station, 
whose subject was, " Some phases of the Dairy 
Question." Mr. Mossman spent several years in Wis- 
consin and other western states, studying along this 
line of work, and is therefore well equipped with the 
full knowledge of the latest methods used in dairying. 



The paper he presented before the club was exceed- 
ingly instructive. 

On Dec. 1 1th Prof. Howard spoke to the club upon 
Johns Hopkins University. In an informal way he told 
of the founding of the university, its growth, and its 
unsurpassed advantages. The speaker paid a high 
tribute to his former instructor. Pros. Remsen, and 
pointed out many features of University life which 
manifest themselves at an institution like Johns 
Hopkins. 



A TALE OF PONTIAC'S CONSPIRACY. 

Nearly a century and a half has passed away since 
the close of the French and Indian war and the 
Indian conspiracies that followed immediately after it, 
and yet so stirring were the events of that time that we 
have but to read of them and exercise our imagination 
to see them as almost real, and to feel as though the 
scenes of savage warfare were now being enacted 
before our eyes. On the bank of the river that joins 
Lake St. Clair and Lake Huron is an Indian village, 
its wigwams standing in an enclosure made by the 
towering trees of the forest which at this spot stands a 
little way back from the river's edge. It is a beauti- 
ful and quiet spot. Close by flow the silent waters of 
the river on their way to the lakes and the ocean. In 
the rear stand the trees of the forest, tall, sombre, 
majestic; huge monarchs long since gone to decay. 
Beyond the river, too, extends the forest losing itself 
beyond the summits of some distant hills. 

Hardly a sound breaks the universal stillness, the 
little village seems lonely and deserted, and deserted 
it is save for the squaws, one disabled brave and a 
comely maiden. The girl sits on a log busily at 
work embroidering a moccasin. Not far away a fire 
is burning and over it a kettle is sizzling, for the sun is 
sinking and the warriors who are gone on a hunting 
trip down the river are expected home soon. 

How deft are the fingers of the maiden, and how 
rapidly the moccasin grows beneath her hand, and yet 
the girl's thoughts seem far away from the village and 
from her work. Now and again her hands fall list- 
lessly in her lap and with dreamy eyes she gazes out 
across the river into the depths of the forest beyond. 
So intently does she gaze that it seems as though she 
saw even beyond the hills. Thus is she sitting and 
vacantly gazing when someone approaches from 



AGGIE LIFE. 



75 



behind ; she quickly turned her head. 

" Ah ! Wapita," she says, half affirming, half ques- 
tioning, as her eyes meet those of the Indian Warrior, 
" you are feeling better ?" 

" Yes," he replied, " in two more suns Wapita will 
be a warrior once more." 

The girl has resumed her embroidering ; the brave 
throws himself on the ground a short distance away 
and continues : 

" Laughing Water is sad to-day ; how often I have 
seen her look out across the river towards the rising 
sun. Is she sick ? or perhaps she is in love, and is 
thinking of someone far away in a distant village?" 

" Laughing Water was thinking of friends, and the 
thought that they may perhaps die makes her sad," 
she replys. 

In the dusk of the evening the brave does not 
notice the color that steals into her cheek. He rises, 
and folding his blanket around him approaches the 
girl. His trained ears have caught the source of pad- 
dles, and soon emerging from the shadows of the 
bend, a canoe rapidly approaches. It is the hunting 
party returning. The canoe reaches the bank and 
softly grates the sand. The warriors step out ; two 
deer are thrown upon the bank ; a warrior takes the 
paddles while the rest of the party gently lift the 
canoe from the water and place it on the bank. Then 
all silently approach the fire. At the approach of the 
hunting party the squaws begin to prepare the evening 
meal. The deer are brought up and dressed and 
soon the odor of broiling venison permeates the air. 
The braves who have been seated around the fire, 
silently smoking, now lay aside their pipes and begin 
to eat. 

Where is the Indian maiden ? She has withdrawn 
to the cover of the shadows and there sits dreaming 
while a silent watcher of the party gathered in the 
light of the fire. The meal is soon over, the rem- 
nants are removed, the fire replenished, and the war- 
riors resume their pipes. 

•' Winnieta," calls the chieftain to a squaw near by, 
♦' slice some more venison ; we have company 
to-night." 

This command given he resumes his pipe, and 
assumes the stolid indifference of his comrades. 

An hour passes when suddenly each warrior lifts 
his head and listens while one, quickly rising, throws 



aside his blanket and disappears in the wood. The 
others remain listening ; soon the brave returns and 
without a word takes up his blanket and resumes his 
seat beside the fire. Soon the noise of paddles may 
be distinctly heard. A short interval of silence ensues 
and then may be seen along the river bank the dusky 
shadows of a party of men. A rippling sound of 
waters as of a boat being lifted out of the river fol- 
lowed by the easy measured tread of men is borne on 
the night air. The members of the party draw near 
the fire and seat themselves. Not a word is spoken. 
The newcomers devour the steaming venison pre- 
pared for them, and then lighting their pipes they 
began to smoke. 

Thus sits a silent band around a camp-fire in the 
woods. Why come these brothers ? Are they simply 
friendly huntsmen enjoying the hospitality of their 
brothers for a night, or what is their mission ? For a 
long time nothing is heard save the voices of the 
night and the forest. The squaws have retired to 
their wigwams ; alone in the shadow of the trees still 
sits the Indian maiden, Laughing Water. 

The evening is far gone when the leader of the 
bands at the village, he who had addresses Winnieta, 
rises and begins to speak. 

" Brothers," he began, " many winters ago before 
we were born there landed on the shore of the great 
lake that lies towards the rising sun a band of English- 
men. Tradition says that great was the surprise' of 
our fathers on going down to the shore one morning 
to find many pale face warriors in camp there, and to 
see their big canoes lying off the shore. Many sum- 
mers and winters have gone since then, and now the 
pale face warriors have driven the redmen farther and 
farther towards the setting sun and he is forced to 
see the beautiful hunting grounds of his fathers fall 
before the white man's axe. These Englishmen are 
our foes ; everyday we are forced to see our brothers 
killed at their relentless hands. You all know what 
the Chieftain said to-day at the council at the fork of 
the river. Fifty of our picked warriors are to go to 
the fort beyond the lake and there with Pontiac as 
leader, kill the garrison. Our great Chieftain is guided 
by the Great Spirit who will befriend the redmen 
against their foes. Brothers, who of you does not 
love these pleasant hunting-grounds, this boundless 
forest, the dark blue lake, the deep and mighty river, 



76 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the mountains reared aloft to mock the fury of the 
storm ? Shall we be driven from the land of our 
fathers that the pale face may hunt in our hunting- 
grounds ? We will go with the Chieftain and drive 
away the pale face from our land." 

" Ugh," is the deep grunt of assent from the grim 
band seated about the fire. 

" To-morrow," continues the Chief, " at the rising 
of the sun we will depart to join our Chieftain at the 
fork of the river." 

There is another deep gutteral of assent and then 
the Indians rise and go to their wigwam's where they 
are now sound asleep. 

Not so with Laughing Water who, sitting in the 
shadow unnoticed by the warriors has been an eager 
listener- to what the leader has said. She sits for 
some time longer in the shadow, wrapped in her blan- 
ket. The embers of the fire are almost cold as with 
her resolution taken she, too, rises and retires to 
slumber. 

On the morrow after the warriors have departed in 
their canoes down the river. Laughing Water silently 
and unnoticed glides into the forest. 

***** 

The command at the fort of Detroit was one of 
those companies sent out by the English at about this 
date to hold different points of vantage throughout the 
Northwest which it was deemed expedient to garrison. 
The soldiers by ill-treatment had soon gained the 
ill-will of the Indians and t rouble was brewing. 

On the morniug of the second day after 'the events 
just related there sits at breakfast at Fort Detroit, 
the young and handsome Major Gladwyn. Opposite 
to him sits a subordinate officer. 

" I do not anticipate any trouble at present," the 
Major remarks to his companion. 

" Nor do I," replies his companion. 

" But have you heard anything as to whether the 
the camp on the lake has been moved?" asks Glad- 
wyn, referring to a large encampment of a hostile 
band only a short distance from the fort. 

"Yes, they have gone ; two of our scouts returning 
yesterday from a hunting trip report the village 
deserted." 

" Well, I don't attach any particular significance 
to that," replies the Major." probably they moved to 
get where game is more plentiful ; you know our own 



scouts report the game very abundant beyond the lake 
to the northward." 

The conversation then turns to other matters. The 
laughter interspersed showed plainly that there was 
no fear of danger. 

In the meantime approaching the fort from the 
forest, is the Indian girl, Laughing Water. The 
maiden is well known at the fort having often brought 
moccasins to the officers of the fort. She is at once 
admitted and in broken English demands to see the 
great chief of the pale faces. 

Major Gladwyn and his companion have just finished 
breakfast when the girl is ushered into their presence. 
Who can say what feelings assailed the heart of the 
daughter of the forest as she gazed at the handsome 
form and face of the Major. Even Wapitan who 
had hit nearer than he suspected would hardly have 
dreamed that the heart of the maiden was beating for 
the chief of the pale face warriors ; and yet the vis- 
ion of Laughing Water as she sat on the log by the 
fire and gazed so intently across the river into the 
forest was no other than that of a handsome warrior 
in yonder garrison, else why should an Indian girl whose 
sympathies lay with her people have sat in the shadow 
of the trees when the braves of her tribes were 
assembled about the fire planning the death of the 
garrison. Yes, Lauging Water in truth had been sad 
for fear a certain pale face brave should die. For 
many days the deep rumblings of a conspiracy had 
reached her ears and it was the danger that threat- 
ened and feelings that were awakened by the threat- 
ening danger that caught the quick eye of Wapitan. 

Through the depths of the forest a day and a night 
she has traveled with unerring footsteps on her mission 
of love. And now she stands before the handsome 
chief. 

"Why, Laughing Water," says the Major rising 
and grasping the maiden's hand. Cruel and yet unin- 
tentional to feed the fire thus ; only the stern and 
staid- habits of her race could have conquered them. 

" Laughing Water is welcome," continues the 
officer, '■' does she bring friends with her?" 

" The Indian girl comes alone," replied the maiden, 
and taking from her bosom, a pair of beautifully 
embroidered moccasins she hands them to the chief. 

Can the Major be blind ? No, but how impossible 
the gulf that separates one race from another. He 



AGi 



LIFE, 



77 



thanks her, would pay her, but she gently refuses. 
He looks into her eyes while she returns the gaze for 
a moment. Her heart fails her as she turns to leave 
the room. 

She wanders about the fort while the forenoon 
travels apace. Her manner attracts the attention of 
an officer who unable to understand what she says 
again conducts her to the apartment of the Major. 
Moved by the kindness of the chief she divulges the 
plot. Gladwyn listens in alarm. For many minutes 
he sits absorbed in thought. Turning suddenly his 
heart filled with gratitude he looks for Laughing 
Water but she is gone. He glances at the glass. It 
is nearly noon. Pontiac and his braves will soon be 
here. Bounding to his feet he hurries from the room 
and is soon engaged in getting his men in readiness 
for the attack. The garrison is soon armed, every- 
thing is secured, and all is now in readiness. The 
sun has begun to sink in the west, v/hen the watch in 
the tower announces the approach of the Indians. 

The men are drawn up in line and stand with ready 
muskets as Pontiac knocks at the gate of the palisade. 
It is opened and one by one the redmen file in. The 
brow of the Chieftain darkens as over the shoulder of 
the English commandant, he gazes at the array of 
armed men. 

" Ugh," he says, and demands to know what it 
means. 

The Major replies that he is drilling his warriors 
and commands his men to cover the Indians with 
their muskets. Then stepping up to the leader he 
pulls aside the blanket and discloses the musket there 
concealed. The Indians maintain their imperturbable 
indifference except that Pontiac's brow grows darker 
and darker as the commander upbraids him for his 
treachery. V/hen the Major has finished his talk he 
dismisses the whole band, who file out across the 
clearing and are lost in the depths of the woods. 

So has the plot of the great Pontiac been foiled 
because of the love of an Indian maiden whose 
fidelity to her love had saved the life of the English 
commander and those of his men. 

Gladwyn now bethinks himself of Laughing Water. 
Upon inquiry he learns that she was seen to leave his 
room, hasten to the gate of the fort, where she was 
permitted to pass and then to cross the clearing and 
disappear in the forest. The Major breathes a prayer 



that the true-hearted girl may escape the possible 
consequences of her act. 

He never learned her fate though probably 
it never transpired how the English were warned. 
Yet even in the enjoyment of life the commandant has 
cause to remember the fidelity of the Indian girl. 



JIMMIE McLEAN— ENGINEER. 

Jimmie McLean's father had been for a good many 
years an engineer in the employ of the New York and 
New England railroad. One dark, foggy night, failing 
to see the danger signal he had run his engine into an 
open draw and had gone dov/n with it to a grave in the 
waters of Fort Point Channel. Mr. McLean, though 
a steady, saving man, had been unable to do no more 
than provide for his family of six children. So it 
happened that Jimmie, who was fifteen years old when 
his father died, found himself thus early in life, com- 
pelled to go to work and help support his younger 
brothers and sisters. 

Through the influence of a friend of Jimmie's 
father, he was given a position as messenger in the 
local freight office of the railroad company. It was 
his duty to carry the mail between the office and the 
piers, freight houses and other points in the terminal 
yards. 

Jimmie's father had left him no money, but he had 
bequeathed to him a good sound body, a cheerful dis- 
position, and an intense love for anything pertaining to 
a locomotive. He found opportunities to cherish this 
emotion within him, for his trips took him daily among 
engines and the men who handled them. He took 
delight in watching the switching engines spurting to 
and fro as they bunted cars from one track to another ; 
in seeing the big Mogul come slowly puffing into the 
yard drawing the heavy through freight from the west ; 
and in examining the iron monsters as they stood in 
their stalls in the roundhouse, breathing heavily as 
they rested from their long run, and were made 
ready for the return trip. His cheery smile and pleas- 
ant manners soon won the hearts of the men about the 
yard. One of them, a big burly. Irishman named Sul- 
livan took quite a fancy to him and they soon struck 
up an intimate acquaintance. Jimmie's noon trip 
took him to First Street which was at the entrance of 
the freight yards, and he would then spend a happy 
hour with Mr. Sullivan who used to let him ring the 



78 



AGGIE LIFE. 



bell and blow the whistle as they went bumpety-bump, 
bunnpety-bump over the rails and rattled over the 
switches. He watched the fireman feed the fire, 
observed Mr. Sullivan as he opened and closed the 
throttle or reversed the engine, helped him oil up and 
in this way soon became quite familiar with the work- 
ing of an engine. Mrs. McLean mindful of the dan- 
ger of an engineer's life was in hopes that Jimmie 
would take to the work of the office, but he was keen 
enough to gather from the conversation of the men 
there that although they were well dressed and seemed 
to be doing well in life, it took all their week's salary 
to keep up appearances. This kind of a life had no 
attraction for Jimmie. He would rather be out in the 
yard riding on an engine, and he looked forward to the 
time when he would have one of his own to run. His 
mother peeing that his mind was fixed, wisely did all 
that she could to direct his mind and actions, so that 
he might achieve success in the business he chose to 
to follow. 

Two years went by and Jimmie waited patiently for 
a chance to become a " wiper" in the round house, 
for this was usually the first step towards becoming a 
fireman. Promotion came sooner than he expected 
however. It happened in this way. 

Engine No. 931 stood on a side track at First 
Street one noon with steam upready to be coupled on 
to the train which it was to pull out at twelve-thirty. 
The engineer and fireman were eating their dinners 
in a shanty near by. Jimmie was standing in front of 
the office watching some men who were unloading, 
with a derrick, some heavy iron beams. Suddenly 
the chain which held two of them in mid air broke 
and they fell with a heavy jar to the ground. An 
instant later Jimmie saw No. 93] slowly start along 
the rails toward him. Something must be wrong he 
thought as she came toward him with quickenning 
speed. Then it dawned upon him like a flash ; the 
jar of the falling beams must have opened the throttle, 
and 931 was running away! He quickly turned a 
switch near by which would throw her on to the out- 
ward track, and as she passed him, still gaining In 
momentum, he jumped- aboard and blew a loud blast 
of the whistle. At this sound the startled fireman and 
engineer came rushing out of the shanty and seeing 
their engine drawing away from the yard started in a 



vain pursuit. Jimmie had grasped the throttle as he 
had seen Mr. Sullivan do so 'many times to stop his 
engine, but instead of closing it he had opened it still 
wider and then could not close it again. The engine 
leaped forward as if with new life in her veins and 
Jimmie remembered then having heard the engineer 
tell the master mechanic in the round house that 
the throttle pin was out of repair. There was nothing 
that he could do but to keep water in her boiler and 
let her go until the fire burned out and the steam was 
gone. There was no danger of meeting another train 
on that track but, — and the thought made Jim- 
mie's hair stand on end — how about the train which 
had left but three minutes before ? At the rate he 
was then going it would be a matter of but a few min- 
utes before he would overtake it, and then some- 
thing dreadful would happen. No. 931 was plunging 
ahead at a terrific speed ; the telegraph poles, the 
fences and fields passed him so quickly as to make 
him dizzy as he clung to the window of the cab. He 
fastened the whistle so that it blew a continuous blast 
and kept the bell ringing to warn the people at the 
stations and crossings which he passed. On, on, he 
flew every moment bringing him nearer to the train 
which must now be not far ahead of him. His fears 
were only too true for, as he rounded a curve he saw, 
a short distance ahead of him, the train moving slow- 
ly along unconscious of the danger which threatened 
it. The noise of the whistle soon attracted the atten- 
tion of the men on the train and he saw that the engi- 
neer was putting on more steam. It was to be a race 
for life ! Which would win 1 Jimmie saw that his 
engine was gaining and felt that in a moment or two 
he would go crashing into the train in front of him, 
and that this would be his first and last experience at 
running an engine. But no, there was yet hope. If 
the train could be switched off in time at the station 
just ahead he would yet be safe. As they neared it 
he saw the engine ahead swerve to the right. The 
engineer of 931 after his futile chase had telegraphed 
along the line, and this was the first station at which 
the train could be side-tracked. As the last car of 
the train crossed the switch, the man had just time 
enough to turn it back again when Jimmie went dash- 
ing by. He had a clear track ahead of him now, and 
he began to enjoy his ride npw that the danger was 



AGGIE LIFE. 



79 



past. The fire was beginning to get low, and the 
engine gradually slackened its pace so that at the next 
station it was switched off onto a spur track, at the 
end of which it was brought to a standstill by a pile of 
sleepers, with no further damage than a smashed 
cowcatcher. 

Thus ended Jimmie's first attempt at running a 
locomotive. The next day he was told to report at 
the superintendent's office, who after praising him for 
his bravery ordered him to report to Mr. Sullivan the 
next morning and fire for him until further notice. It 
was some years ago that Jimmie received these wel- 
come orders. After a few years of faithful work as 
fireman, promotion came again and to-day he is the 
proud master of the fastest engine on the road. 

Arthur- L. Dacy. 



A VISIT TO WOLF PEN FARM. 

The Senior Division in Agriculture spent a few 
days in visiting Wolf Pen one of the most interesting 
farmis in Massachusetts. This estate, the property of 
Mr. J. Montgomery Sears is situated a short distance 
from Southboro and consists of fifteen hundred acres 
of land and extensive buildings. Mr. Clark, M. A. C. , 
'92, is at present the farm superintendant at Wolf 
Pen and acted as guide for the party. The first place 
visited upon the farm was the stables. Here a num- 
ber of carriage and saddle horses are kept. After 
this the cow stables were visited. The entire herd 
is composed of registered Jerseys from the Channel 
islands. At present there is at the college barn sev- 
eral animals donated by Mr. Sears. All the animals 
at Wolf Pen receive excellent care and are in the 
best possible condition. The arrangement of the 
stables is worthy of particular notice. The feeding is 
done from a car that is suspended in front of the 
mangers and can be pushed along as the feeder 
proceeds. On the floor above is stored the fodder. 
Here also is situated a forty-five horse power engine 
which is employed in running fodder cutters and other 
machinery. 

On another part of the farm is situated a henery 
where several thousand Plymouth Rock hens are 
kept. A large number of pigs are kept, mostly 
Poland Chinas. Mr. Sears has recently put in place 
a stone crusher and soon intends to have stone roads 



all over his farm. About seventy-five sheep are kept 
upon Wolf Pen and a herd of goats will probably be 
procured soon. The greenhouses were visited and an 
excellant lot of flowers were in blo.ssom. 

The party visited Deerfoot farm early the second 
day and noted many important points. The principal 
object of this farm is the production of milk but sev- 
eral lesser products are also turned out. The origin 
of the name of the farm is quite interesting, the name 
being originally applied to Mr. Sear's farm. Upon a 
hill that was visited on his place is a spring where 
before the encroachments of man drove him from his 
wooded fastness, a deer came regularly to drink. It 
seems more than propably that this spring was a fav- 
orite watering place of many wild animals as its loca- 
tion would recommend it to them. But to return to 
the last deer that found in this spring the wherewith 
to satisfy his thirst. We can easily imagine him, a 
noble creature standing beside the spring and casting 
his eye over the valley below. How like the creature 
that Scott describes in the passage. 

" Ttie noble stag was pausing now, 
Upon the mountain's Southern brow." 

Before him are signs of a growing population, 
behind him the forest that even now re-echoes with 
the sound of the woodmans axe. The tradition has 
it that he turned from the scene before him and after 
making an imprint of his foot in the soil at the bot- 
tom of the spring he dashed away and was seen no 
more. How far this tradition corresponds with truth 
we will not attempt to say but the fact remains, that 
from the imprint of a deers foot in this spring origi- 
nated the name that afterwards was give to the Deer- 
foot farm and the Deerfoot Sausage factory. 

After visiting the Deerfoot Farms the Sausage fac- 
tory was visited. The successive steps in the manu- 
facture of sausages were noticed from the point where 
the live pigs came in upon the cars to the point where 
the complete sausage was wrapped for shipment. 
The milk factory in connection with the sausage fac- 
tory was examined. The milk from Deerfoot and 
several other farms is here bottled and shipped to the 
Boston market. The last place visited was owned by 
Mr. Bowditch who has a very systematic farm and 
does an immense milk business in Boston. After 
examining several of the best animals here the party 
were driven to the depot at South Framingham. 



8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Colle^f ^otfs- 



— 1901 

Index 

Is out. 

— Prof. Lull and family spent Thanksgiving-day in 
Boston. 

— Prof. Howard spent Thanksgiving at his home in 
Wilbraham. ' 

—Dr. Waldo addressed the Y. M. C. A. on Thurs- 
day, November 4, his subject being " Missions." 

— Howard Maynard, '99, who is now a Junior at 
Worcester Tech. spent his Thanksgiving recess at 
home in Amherst. 

— E. F, McCobb, '02, has been elected manager 
and captain of the basket-ball team. Practice has 
already commenced. 

— The Amherst Record of Dec. 6, contains an 
interesting letter from Miss Helena T. Goessmann on 
" Social Life in Miinster. 

— J. G. Cooke has been chosen captain of the 
freshman basket-ball team and G. E. O'Hearn cap- 
tain of the baseball team. 

— Prof, and Mrs. J. E. Ostrander wish to announce 
that they will be at home to the students on Monday 
evenings during January. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker addressed the meeting of the 
State Board of Agriculture at Westfield on Decem- 
ber 6. His subject was, " The Relation of Trusts to 
the Farmer." 

— The senior class has appointed a class commit- 
tee to choose a class photographer and to obtain class 
canes. The committee consists of Parmenter, Mun- 
son and Hull. 

— At a meeting of the Reading-room directors held 
on Friday last the bids for the position of college mail- 
carrier and reading-room attendant were considered 
and Dacey was chosen for the winter term. 

— The junior class elected the following officers for 
the winter term of 1900: Pres't. E. S. Gamwell ; 
vice-pres't,"E. L. Macomber ; sec'y and treas., J. H. 
Chickering; class captain, C. L. Rice ; historian, C. 
E. Gordon ; class physician, D. S. Greely ; class un- 
dertaker, P, C. Brooks, 



— Dr. Walker preached at the First Congregational 
church in Holyoke Sunday, Dec. 3. The event was 
the 100th anniversary of the founding of the church. 
Dr. Walker is a former pastor of that church. 

— The fourteenth annual dinner of the M. A. C. 
club of New York was held at the hotel St. Denis, 
Broadway, New York on Friday evening, Dec. 8th. 
President Goodell and Prof. Babson were present. 

— On Thanksgiving-day, directly after dinner, the 
Tigers and the Giants played a matched game of base- 
ball, the score being 2 to 2. The principal feature of 
this game was the kicking against the decisions of the 
umpire. 

— The military promenade committee consists of 
the following members : Canto, chairman. Prof. Lull, 
Dr. Paige, Parmenter, Kellogg, Monahan, Barry, 
Whitman, Leslie and Dickerman. It was voted to 
hold the dance on Friday evening Feb. 23, 1900. 

— E. S. Gamwell has been elected first director 
and business manager of the M. A. C. Boarding club 
for the winter term. The other directors are: H. 
Baker, vice-pres't ; J. H. Chickering, sec'y and treas., 
and M. B. Landers, N. J. Hunting, R. W. Morse, R. 
H. Robertson. 

—A running track is being placed in the drill hall. 
It is 6 ft. in width and runs entirely around the inside 
of the hall. Considerable new gymnasium apparatus 
is to be secured and will probably be ready for use by 
the opening of the winter term. The hall receives a 
great deal of use. The dancing class has its use two 
evenings during the week and the different class bas- 
ket-ball teams the other evenings. Training for track 
and field athletics will begin immediately after the 
Christmas vacation and the baseball men will use the 
cage for batting practice. 

— During the summer term of '99, a library book, 
left upon the radiator in the tower entry together with 
a number of text-books, mysteriously disappeared in a 
few short moments while the holder of the book was 
attending the regular morning chapel exercises. Re- 
cently this fall another library book disappeared like- 
wise from the same place and in few short moments 
although held by a different person. The loser of the 
latter book, together with the aid of President Good- 
ell, has discovered the person accountable for the dis- 
appearance of his book and has found that the sam^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



8i 



person is accountable for the disappearance of the 
other last spring. Both books are now in their places 
in the library, but we hope the guilty party will receive 
his just deserts. 

— On Thanksgiving day, promptly at 9-22 a. m. the 
resident alumni team lined up against the sophomore 
team upon the campus for a game of foot-ball. The 
game was well played and was full of interest and fun 
to those upon the side lines at least. The alumni 
team was heavy but showed a lack of practice. The 
sophomore team was very light but did fairly good 
team work, considering that nearly one-half of them 
were not members of the regular class team. The 
feature of the game was the constant fumbling, the 
ball being in the air or rolling around the ground look- 
ing for some one to pick it up more than half the 
time. The alumni signals were worthy of note. Their 
players were Prof. Cooley, Prof. Smith, Pingree, 
Hooker, Walker, Maynard, Burrington, Drew, Hem- 
enway, Hubbard and Clark. Neither team scored. 



mprfssior^S 



ler. 



At a meeting of the Boarding Club held upon Dec. 
9 it was voted to give to all those foot ball players 
who needed it their board free for the time during 
which they were playing foot ball. The Idler is 
pleased with generosity in any form but he has recently 
been led to ask himself, have we not expended more 
than a proportionate share of our energies upon foot 
ball instead of being more conservative and spreading 
them out so as to be equally successful in all our 
athletics. Now while it is an excellent thing to have a 
good foot ball team it is an irreparable injury to have 
no base ball team. Last spring we were unfortunate 
in this respect. This appears to have been due to the 
fact that we had by our previous football team and by our 
track team, overdrawn upon our stock of enthusiasm 
and when it came to base ball we were so debilitated 
in this respect as to be unable to marshall our remain- 
ing forces and make any kind of a showing whatever. 
We must not lose sight of the fact that at most we 
are a college small in numbers and we must carefully 
guard every expenditure of energy to obtain the best 
results. It may be a hard matter to decide just how 
much of our energy we should spend upon foot b'all 



and how much upon each of our athletic teams but it 
is nevertheless a matter which demands our carefull 
attention. 

Relative to the gift of the Boarding Club to the 
foot ball team the Idler has a few words to say. A 
certain individual who is not a member of the Board- 
ing Club in a recent conversation complained that the 
Club had by the vote passed upon Dec. 9 deprived 
him and many others of the right of sharing in the 
expense of remunerating the foot ball team. Of 
course this gentleman will not find opportunities want- 
ing for him to offer pecuniary aid to the team, but 
perhaps after all, his remarks were quite pertinent. 
At present there are but eighty members of the Board- 
ing Club while in college there are one hundred and 
twenty. Two thirds of the college have gone forward 
and usurped a privilege which the whole college should 
have enjoyed. As the Idler stated before he is pleased 
with generosity but he sounds a warning note against 
this method of appropriating money. Money that is 
expended should come by a direct tax. If it does 
not there is certain to arise more or less laxity with 
regards to such appropriations. The indirect tax or 
the permission to draw upon capital already accumu- 
lated is easy to obtain but it is capable of many abuses 
that should be carefully considered. 



HOPE. 

Awake throughout the night, I rise ere morn. 
With its grey light illuminates the sky. 

And swift in me an impulse new is born 
With noble strength I swear it shall not die. 

The glowing sun comes peeping o'er the hills, 
1 watch it starting on its daily round. 

And soon I hear the murmur of the rills. 

That through the night in silence were ice bound 

The frosted margin on my window-pane 
Soon melts before the radiant morning sun. 

I must be tested and be tried again. 
Before yon luminous orb his work has done. 

Such thoughts as this flit through my weary brain. 

As I perform the labors of the day, 
Yet multitudinous hopes I entertain 

And move about in my accustomed way. 

The day is long and ceaseless is the strife. 
Yet with success I bid the sun good-night 

That day I crossed the rubicon of life. 
And entered to a field of glorious light. 



82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE STUDENT'S PARADISE. 

There is a happy land 

Far, far away, 
And through its glens and dales 

1 long to stray ; 
No hard lessons to prepare, 

Not a trouble, not a care. 
Everything is bright and fair 

Throughout the day. 

Lazily the rippling v/aves 

Break on the sand ; 
Softly the zephyrs light 

Steal o'er the land; 
Strains of music fill the air, 
Odors sweet and perfumes rare. 
Natures choicest works are there 

At our command. 

Jn the soft and balmy air 

Storms never rise, 
Lowering banks of thunder-clouds 

Never mar the skies. 
All is pleasure, peace and rest, 
Slumber is a welcome guest, 
Surely 'tis of all spots blest, 

A Paradise ! 



And in that happy land 

Unstained by woe. 
Examinations are unknown. 

Profs, cannot go. 
Enemies of the student-kind 
Vainly seek its entrance blind. 
Which the '' cribber " and the 

Never know. 



• grind ' 



Oh, could my wish come true 

There would I flee, 
Dwelling in that land 

I'd ever be 
And on its golden shore 
Dreaming of forgotten lore 
I would linger evermore 

From labor free. 



WHIST. 

For the promotion of good whist but also of socia- 
bility in College, the Fraternity conference Is to ap- 
point an evening of progressive whist early next term 
and has charged a committee with the planning of the 
entertainment. While whist may be the distinctive 
feature it need not be the sole one. Doubtless a 
large number of the faculty and students and alumni 
would find such an evening enjoyable, especially if 



their preferences should be regarded in providing for 
the occasion. 

To this end the undersigned cordially invite sug- 
gestions from any one for such an evening. Com- 
munications should be addressed to, 

C. Wellington, 

M. A. C, 
Amherst, Mass. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Determination of Radicles in Carbon Compounds by 
Dr. H. Meyer — an English translation from the Ger- 
man. The German edition of this work was quite 
successful and undoubtedly this English translation 
will be of considerable use to advanced students of 
Chemistry. 

Indicators and Test-papers by Alfred Cohn. This is 
a systematic arrangement of facts regarding the 
action and application of indicators and test papers 
which are used at the present time. The book is 
designed for chemists, pharmacists and students. 

Thoinot and Masselin's Outlines of Bacteriology , 
translated by Wm. St. Clair Symmers, M. B. This 
is a practical hand-book for students gotten up in a 
very convenient form. Part I. which occupies about 
one-third of the book contains a great deal of practi- 
cal information concerning the collection, preparation 
for microscopic examination and general culture of 
bacteria. The apparatus used in connection with 
these processes is quite fully illustrated. Part II. is 
divided iuto three chapters : Microbial Diseases com- 
mon to Man and the Lower Animals, Diseases Spec- 
ial to certain of the Higher Animals, and Microbial 
Diseases peculiar to Man. This classification and 
the method of treatment each individual species of 
bacteria make the book of especial value to medical 
and veterinary students. 

Diurnal Lepidoptera by Westwood and Doubleday 
with colored plates consists of' three volumes pub- 
lished between 1846 and 1850. These books were 
obtained from a London book dealer at a cost of a 
little over 20£, They are quite rare and only a very 
few sets are available at the present time. 

Among our new books of fiction are Richard Carvel 
and The Choir Invisible by James Lane Allen. Both 
are typical American books and are among the most 
celebrated novels of the year. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



83 



Ej^cHain^es. 



The Tuftonian for November will well repay one for 
its perusal. The poem, " Peace," written in memo- 
riam, is beautiful. 

We think the Exchange column in The Lake Breeze 
for October full as interesting as that in the September 
number. 

We miss the usual abundance of literary matter in 
The Latin and High School Review for November. 

In spite of the melancholy thoughts of cruel winter 
which autumn brings, there are yet many days in the 
fall of the year so beautiful that even spring does not 
furnish hours of greater charm to one who delights in 
the companionship of Nature. Though one is apt to 
find in most all of the poetry written about autumn 
that undertone of melancholy which implies a sadness, 
born of regret for the departed birds and flowers ; still 
there is a charm in such verse and a beauty in its 
very sadness which appeals to us. We derive our 
love for autumn in the perfect days and in the harvest- 
time which belongs to that season ; we derive our 
pleasure in reading the poetry of autumn from three 
sources ; First in the appreciation of the beauties of 
the summer just gone which we so much enjoyed and 
the fading away of which gives that tinge of sadness 
to the lines we read ; secondly, in the glory of the 
autumn itself ; and last, in the knowledge that spring- 
time must soon come again. 

" O'er the tree-tops gently sigliing, 

Blows the cooling western breeze ; 
And a wailing almost human 

Seems to issue from the trees ; 
All around and many-colored, — 
Yellow, pale, and hectic red — 
Lie the leaves, now flutt'ring idly 
With the legions of the dead. 

Through the wood the silvery brooklet 

Ever sings in happy tone ; 
And of all this sombre wild-wood, 

Cheerful is the brook alone ; 
In the trees the nests are empty, 

Gone are all the birds and bees — 
Naught but stalks show where the flowers 
Flourished underneath the trees." 
This is an appreciative aud pretty picture. The 
last verses of each stanza would bear a little more 
study, especially that of the second stanza. The verb 



is too cold and pompous and the preposition too pon- 
derous to convey the sense of delicate beauty which 
we associate with the fragile flowers of the deeper 
woods. 

The Tech recently published a good story. We 
hope this paper will make more of the literary depart- 
ment than it formerly has done and we should like to 
see more stories. 



unmi. 



'81. — Chas. E. Boynton, Physician, Smithfield 
Coche Co., Utah. 

'81 — W. B. Howe member of the firm of W. B. & 
O. B. Howe(successors to C. B. Greenwood) manu- 
facturers of and wholesale dealers in Pure Cider 
Vinegar, corner of Maple and Harward Streets, Marl- 
boro, Mass. 

'87. — At the twenty-first annual meeting of the 
American Guernsey Cattle Club, held in New York 
cily, December 13, 1899, William H. Caldwell was 
re-elected secretary and treasurer. Address : Peter- 
boro, N. H. 

'90. — Announcement has been received of the 
marriage of Henry Lincoln Russell to Miss Mary 
Belle King, at Boston, Mass., on Tuesday, December 
12, 1899. After a wedding tour to Washington, Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell will reside at 34 Greene Street, 
Pawtucket, R. I., where they will be at home Tuesdays 
after Febuary first. 

'91. — M. A. Carpenter, landscape gardener with 
Olmsted Bros., Brookline, Mass. Address: Park 
Road, Mt Auburn, Mass. 

'91. — Claude A. Magill, civil engineer, Pennsylvania 
Division of the New York Central R. R., at Corning, 
N. Y. 

'93.— F. H. Henderson, 49 Meridian Street, Maiden 
Mass. 

Ex-93. — William H. Ranney has given up his busi- 
ness in Amherst, and has gone farming in South 
Ashfield. 

'94. — H. J. Fowler is in the employ of the Stand- 
ard Publishing Co., of Boston, Mass, 



84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'94. — Perley E. Davis is manager of the " Kippan- 
woods," 28 County Street, Taunton Mass. 

'94. — " The foot ball team and management deserve 
much credit for their brilliant work this season." 

'94. — Lowell Manley, Weld Farm, West Roxbury, 
Mass. telephone ; Jamaica Plain 126-5. Surely the 
knowledge that the alumni are interested in and are 
watching the team, will serve as an inspiration to the 
fellows. 

Ex-'94. — L. E. Goesmann. formerly salesman for a 
New York fertilizer firm, has accepted a position as 
chemist with the American Fertilizer Co., at Carteret 
N. J., the large fertilizer trust which has lately formed 
and which has been trying to absorb the Bowker 
Company. 

'95. — H. L. Frost has just added about 1400 square 
feet of space to his green houses. Mr. Frost employs 
anywhere from five to ten men during the summer 
season in caring for lawns, ornamental trees and shrubs 
and protecting them from injurious insects and pests. 
During the winter season he devotes his time to his 
green houses. Address: 12 Faneuil Hall Square, 
Boston, Mass- 

'97. — C. A. Peters is joint editor with F. A. Gooch 
of a recently published pamphlet entitled " Die 
Bestimpupurger der bellurigen Sacure bei Gegen wart 
von Haloidsalzen," or, " The Determination of Tellur- 
ous acid in the Presence of Haloid Salts." F. A. 
Gooch is professor in chemistry in the Academic 
Department Yale University and rector of the Kent 
Laboratory of the same institution. 

Ex-'97. — Maurice E. Cook formerly in business as 
a market gardener and florist at Shrewsbury, Mass., 
has gone to California. Address : 522 East Colorado 
Street, Pasadena California. 

'98.— C. N. Baxter, 80 Quincy Ave., Quincy, Mass. 
student in languages at Harvard University, preparing 
for librarian. 

'98. — George H. Wright is in the office of Eunis & 
Stoppani, bankers and brokers, 34-36 New Street, 
New York City. Address : Fort Green Place, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

'98. — A. G. Adjemian is in the employ of the Santa 
Fe Railroad as surveyor. Address : Stillwater, 
Oklahoma. 



'98. — Willis Fisher is farming at his home in 
Ludlow. 

'99. — E. H. Sharpe has been engaged in the 
market gardening business in Northfield Mass. 

'99. — The engagement is announced of Melvin H. 
Pingree and Miss Annie J. Lentell, daughter of Rev. 
J. V. Lentell of Amherst. 

'99. — G. C. Hubbard is at his home in Sunderland. 

'99. — In a recent issue of the " Life " W. A. 
Hooker was stated as taking post-graduate work in 
chemistry, at the college. This was a mistatement. 



The Rub Down 



Is as good as the exercise. Its good Is 
doubled if you rub tlie tired muscles with 




Anodyoei^lNII^ENT 



Endorsed by leading instructors and 
athletes in every line of sport. Ninety 
j'ears record for the cure of sprains, bruises, 
and all inflammation. Sold by druggists. 
Two size bottles— 25 cents or £0 cents. 

I. S. JOHNSON & CO, Boston, Mass. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



50 YEARS' , 
EXPERIENCE 




Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securingpatents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
tpecial notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jlinerican. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, 13 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN8Co.36^Broadway,NewYork 

Branch Office. C26 F St., Washington, D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $]3.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remeraber these suits are 2?ressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

Kellojjg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Wc Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spsre hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St.. Chicago. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 

mm TEBCPS' HSEKGIES OF HinEKIGH. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pilisburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York,-Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHlHOTON, D. C, Of PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BKOWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler'8 Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Officb Hours : » a. m. to 6 r. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery .^Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
OflBce, Cook's Block, Amherst, MasB. 



AGGIE LIFU.. 



Start in Basiness for Yoarself . 



8UCCJSSS ASSUBED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructious and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



& 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. T^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
Wm IN ST8?ES Bhl BHNOES. 

AGENT FOK THE CELEBKATED 

Gurney Steatn and Hot Water Heaters. 

Teleplione 56-4. 



c. R. elde: 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 



HEATING, 

HUNT'S BLOCK 



1 AND GAS WORK. 

AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



I 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY. 

|^° All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^J 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehusetts flgriealtapal College. 

AT THE 

COLZiEGE FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Perclieroi) Horses and Souioi Mi 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 

'W. W. BOTMTOM, 

MANUFACTDKER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch iieer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RiVBK Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. E. 13I0KINSQH, B. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO IS .A.. IvI-, 1-30 TO 5 P. T^/L. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 

BOOTS AND SHOKS 

FOB EVERYBODY. 

A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DKESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTTBBEIB OOOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



M^Repairing done tDhil« you wait,.Sig 
3 PMOUflX SOW. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 



FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 



— also 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



Tl 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE 



T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AUITT aTSEET, AMSJEBST, XAS8. 



:E=:E3:.^E?,3iv^.^ciS'T. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, EISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

«Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatii Establishment, 



A.gsie> -A-gerxt, 



H. Iv. OFCA-IVEJ »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

"Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S-^sjSA.TISFA.OI'lOISr C3-XTA.H,A.1TTEB1D. O/S^ 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



^^PaitnUge's mietic OatOtlis * 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Baacers. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



S4 and 86 FrafikUn Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



Jt. F. Kelton. 



. F. 



D. B, Kelton. 



•5 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PODLTBY, YESETaeLES, FISH m OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHiG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



IM Main •teeet, NoRXHAMrTON, Mass. 

T«l«ph*n« connection. 




yi^ Consider— If yon can teep the wet out ^„ 
S5 of your rifle it will not rustnojjreeze. Only A»' 

t Marlin Repeaters *' 



have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) _. 
tells all about them. Up-to-date infer- Of 



mation about powders,black and smoke- ., 
» less; proper sizes, Quantities, how to 3 
1/ load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, \J} 
i jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.: i«> 
', trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All ;Jj 
r calibres 22 to 45; how to care for arms and \9L 
vi , 1,000 other things, including many trade Lp 
«r » secrets never before given to the public, y^ 
^M\Free if you will send Stamps for postage to 
&' Tbe Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct, 



I 



The M. I. Spear Book Store. 



established fiftt tears. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery^ Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. G. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

:e= 13: o T o <3- IS ..^ :e= la: E iR . 



Portrait and Group WorTc a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, §2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
Studio, 17 Spring Street, - - AMHJESnST, MASS. 



Hmberst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manaqbr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITDREJIND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' "WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. 

10 Phoenix Row, 



ARSH, 

Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, GIiOGKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 



J9EPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WAEE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



we: make 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Eegilding done. 



The Northampton Art StoFe. 

t. R. CHETV, Manager. 

CoK. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 

MASS./GRICULTUI[AL COLLEGE, 

BOTANICAL Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 
generally, that we are prepared to supply- 
in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

true to NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 






TAI LOR> 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS. 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



/Ibassacbueetts 

Haricultural 



^ 



• — ORPEIRS • 

1. A SHORT WZHTEB, COURSH of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOnE. YEAE,B' COUH-SE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thoroughfoundationfor further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COUUSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



V ncA^-^. 




%{ XT \C 



% 



>1ASS. 

Jan. 24, 1900. 







L. X. 



NO. 8. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH I ISIOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Fui'nishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be risht. AGGIll! 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. 
treat you right. 



We will try and 



AMHas-r, Aas$. 



Mm 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Eoi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



JMMBS F. PM©E'. 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.§o to $S-oo. 



RERAIRINO. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Weddiiig and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RiaHT. 



COLLESE 
JEWELER 



CflllEC^E 
JE?/ELEB 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

j8®=EYES fitted FKEE.S? 
By a graduate of Dk. Foster, Occulist. 




I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



HARRY CLARK, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



iS 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS., JANUARY 24, 1900. 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribut*. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
t* all subscribers until its discontinuance is •rdered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o{ United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at tho Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



£cl!'t&r!dLls. 



Again we have a military department at the col- 
lege, commanded by an efficient officer. We all 
appreciate the amount of work that must be done be- 
fore the battalion can be brought up to its old condi- 
tion. In doing this, difficulties of every kind will pre- 
sent themselves and the co-operation of the student 
body is needed in order to attain the best results. 
For the present the companies will be drilled in the 
setting up exercises but soon the manual of arms will 
be taken up. 



often been carried too far, but the ungentlemanly 
actions of last Wednesday outstepped the bounds of 
decency and preclude the possibility of any future 
athletic contests between us. 



The Life is sorry that it must criticise the conduct 
of the Williston basket ball team while here last 
Wednesday. It has been the endeavor of our college 
to engage in athletic contests with gentlemanly teams 
and when the Williston team accepted of our hospi- 
tality we expected that they would at least conduct 
themselves in an orderly manner while here. We 
are well aware that the feeling of antagonism that has 
existed between Williston and our own college has 



Upon Feb. 21 there is to be held in the Drill Hall 
a winter Prom. The undertaking is in the hands of a 
joint committee from the faculty and two upper 
classes and everything possible will be done to make 
the thing a success. The hall decorations will be 
equal if not superior to those heretofore. As this 
event is to come the evening before the one on which 
the fraternities are to hold their annual banquets it is 
expected that a large number of the alumni will be 
present. These fraternity banquets are to be held in 
place of the commencement banquets which usually 
come upon Monday night of Commencement week. 
That night will in the future be occupied with a gen- 
eral gathering. 



Now that we have the track laid in the Drill Hall 
it is the place of every one to do his best to keep 



86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



alive an interest in athletics. The management of 
the track team has arranged for interclass meets, the 
first of which is to be held Jan. 27. Those of us 
who do not participate in the meet should at least be 
present and give what encouragement we can to the 
undertaking. These contests were very popular at 
the college not many years ago and we are pleased to 
see that they are being started again. We should, 
however, not lose sight of the fact that our training is 
not solely for these meets but to enable us to get a 
better start in the spring. It is the intention of the 
management of the team to send representatives to 
the handicap meet which is to be held in Mechanics 
Hall, Boston, upon Feb. 3. 



At a meeting of the trustees held some time ago 
important action was taken with regard to college 
tuition and entrance examinations. A few changes 
were also made in the regular course of study. Tui- 
tion was made free to anyone living in the United 
States on the ground that the college received a part 
of its support from the general government as well as 
from the state and therefore people from all over the 
country should be allowed to take advantage of the 
opportunities for education which the college has to 
offer. This action of the trustees is a very com- 
mendable one and should result in increasing the 
popularity of the college outside of the State. With 
the appliances which we possess for the study of the 
sciences we can receive graduates from other state 
colleges who desire to take a more extended course 
than their State can furnish. The requirements for 
entrance to the college have been slightly altered. 
Examinations will no longer be given in Descriptive 
Geography and Metric System as so few candidates 
for admission have been found deficient in these sub- 
jects that an examination in them appears superfluous. 
The usual examinations in English Grammar will now 
be given under the heading, English. This change is 
made because the word English more nearly signifies 
the nature of the requirement. The trustees recog- 
nizing the necessities of a thorough course in French 
and German have made German a required study in 
the sophomore year and French an elective study in 
the senior year. French has been kept a required 
study in the freshman year and German remains an 
elective in the senior year. This will enable students 



to study these languages for two years and become 
proficient in them. The study of Bookkeeping has 
been dropped from the regular course and is in the 
future to be given only in the winter course. 



VOICES OF THE NIGHT. 

The little village of A was all out, as usual, 

on the arrival of the mail- train, not only to get the few 
letters or perhaps the weekly-paper, but to gaze at and 
comment on the new arrivals in town. I happened to 
be the object of their gaze and the subject of their 
comments one bright afternoon in June as I lit from 
the train to take possession of my new farm just out- 
side the village, 

" Yes," said one old codger, " he has bought the 
old Bascom place. Pretty lonely hole, that — right 
near the graveyard." This speech being delivered, 
the rest all crowded round to take a good look at me. 

" One o' them literary fools, I 'spose," said another, 
" they alius buy the most outlandish places I ever see." 

" Well," said a meek looking individual with a 
drawl, " let 'em do as they please. I don't keer 
s'long's they let me alone." 

' Huh, you wouldn't keer if a barrel o' cider was 
poured onto you," " and your eyes was put out" said 
the first speaker. I ain't your way o' thinkin'. Why 
they're spilin' this town. They've been gittin' on the 
school committee lately and interducin' that consarned 
stuff they call nater study instedd o'teachin' the 
youngsters plain readin', writin' and 'rithmetic. One 
feller says as he's goin' to see whether they'll build a 
new high-school or rtot so'sthey can teach 'em Latin 'n 
Greek — I'm consarned if I like that. Why you can't 
swear at a wood-team in Latin, and they ain't none o' 
my children what's goin' to college if I know it." 

This dialogue, and especially the last part was prob- 
ably going on for my especial benefit while I was dis- 
posing of my baggage and other effects in suitable 
manner for carriage to my new abode. This, how- 
ever, troubled me very little, because I know that 
people are apt to talk a great deal on one subject 
when the subjects are few and far between. How- 
ever, all things being considered, I at last reached my 
new dwelling-place — an old-fashioned farm-house of 
the usual style — long, low, with many bay-windows 
having the small panes left in to complete their old- 
fashioned look. To this was attached the out-houses 



AGGIE LIFE. 



87 



and to them the barn of more recent construction. I 
had come here — as is usual for those who love quiet — 
to indulge not only my passion for literary studies but 
also for nature, which always speaks more eloquently 
to one when he is with it day after day. The farm 
presented a good field for this in its variety of scenery : 
On one side there was a large swamp, than which 
there is no place more completely filled with those 
things which delight the naturalist ; rising from it was 
a high hill over which grew a great variety of vegeta- 
tion from the creeping partridge-berry to the great 
oak. Besides these, the green fields spreading far 
and wide were sufficient completion to one of the 
most beautiful pictures I ever saw. I was delighted; 
but why shouldn't I be ? Here was my long-sought- 
for haven of rest. What could there be to dull the 
sharp edge of my love for it? 

Every week as I went to the village to join the 
eager crowd at the station and to gaze in the same 
curious manner as they for news from the outside 
world, I used to pass a large, well-built house of quite 
modern construction and as I returned on my way 
home again in the evening, I used to see three faces 
staring at me from one of the second-story windows. 
This at first seemed only commonplace to me and, 
as there was usually a light in the house, excited no 
curiosity on my part, but when I had seen the same 
thing every Saturday evening for a month in exactly 
the same place, I began to ask questions of the 
villagers. 

"Who lives in that large house on the corner?" 
-said I to the first man 1 met after I had passed the 
house one evening. 

" No one that I know of," said he. 

"Well, I see three faces in the window every night 
I pass there ; some one must have moved in lately." 

'' I ought to know pretty well," he said, " I live 
right next door to the house." 

That settled my questioning him. I met only one 
other man on my way home and asked him the same 
question but received no better satisfaction. And 
thus for a week I inquired of every one I met, with 
the same success. Very few of them seemed in- 
clined to talk about it, so that 1 received very little 
information on the subject until one day I happened 
to meet the meek-looking individual aforementioned. 
He, contrary to my expectations, told me a long story 



about the last inhabitants of the house. " But I 
guess, neighbor, you must be dreamin' when ye pass 
because they aint no one here ever see what you tell 
about," he said as he slowly plodded home in his 
dump-cart. 

The substance of the story was : Two persons, 
man and wife, lived there first and were supposed to 
have been spiritualists. After awhile they joined with 
them two others who were reported to be of the same 
belief. They lived very peaceably together for over a 
year when they suddenly disappeared by night and 
were heard of no more. Moreover, when they left 
they took no luggage with them, although the house 
was known to be filled with costly furniture. This, of 
course, excited much comment for awhile but even 
such a thing as that could not last forever. The 
people being superstitious about it, had let the house 
severely alone, although, beyond these circumstances, 
as he had said on going away no one had ever seen 
any other suspicious signs. 

I began to think I was a favored mortal — that the 
fates had destined me to investigate the mysteries of 
the unknown. Therefore, preparing myself with the 
necessary requisites in the way of apparel, I made my 
way to the questionable house one cool fall evening. 

I waited till it became quite dark and looking up 
towards the window I saw that it was lightened brightly 
by a very white light, and there were then three faces 
as before. 

1 knocked boldly at the door and was immediately 
answered by a well-dressed man who let me into a 
finely lighted hall completely furnished in the Moor- 
ish style. He took my things and placing them on 
the floor in a convenient place, led me directly 
upstairs. I was very much surprised and somewhat 
startled when being led into the very room I have 
spoken of before — the one facing the street — I saw 
ranged around the walls about fifty people seesmingly 
in prayer — kneeling with their heads bowed. 

"These," said my companion speaking for the first 
time, "are spiritualists ; they are not praying but are 
all in a trance." 

" How is this," said I, " 1 thought no one lived 
here." 

" You are right," he said, " mortals do not live here, 
we are immortals. You are indeed a favored man 
to have the privilege of seeing us." 



88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



As he said this they all rose ; but 1 saw before me 
not men but cats, dogs, sheep, horses, and all kinds of 
beasts from the little mouse to the great elephant. 
My companion remained unchanged. The noise 
from the adjoining room attracted my attention to the 
doorway where I beheld not beasts but birds of every 
size and color. In fact, the house seemed suddenly 
alive with hundreds of strange living creatures. 
Another room to which my companion led me con- 
tained fishes which seemed not in the least discom- 
moded by the absence of water. Still another room 
presented to m.y eyes every form of insect. 

I began to wonder, but second thought sufficed to 
show this to be only the fulfilling of the theory of 
spiritualists, that the souls of men take on animal 
forms corresponding to their inclinations in the human 
frame'. 

A new scene was preparing for me : A part of the 
hall was being cleared, and several representatives 
from the different rooms ranged themselves in a row. 
The mouse, the first from the beasts stepped forward 
and in a squeaky voice began to speak : ''I, while I 
lived on earth, was small in mind ; my life was spent 
in doing mean contemptible things. How many men 
have I cut as I passed them on the street ; how many 
men have I envied and sought to injure. I have been 
rewarded ; behold, my friend and beware !" 

Then the fox : " I was sly, my delight was to cheat 
in word and deed, open dealing was out of the question 
with me." 

"I," said the elephant the last of the beasts, " was 
large hearted and intelligent, but. alas, I had one 
fault — I was nosy, a prier into others' business." 

These filed out and the birds next demanded my 
attention. The eagle first began : " you see before 
you, friend, the soul of one of the great lights of Amer- 
ican history ; (cheers from all the rest) for liberty I 
would have sacrificed life itself. However, I even had 
a fault. I stopped not at slaughter to gain my ends." 

" Ha, ha," laughed the vulture in a rough gutteral 
voice. " here you see me a soul who delighted in 
foulness, I was a glutton, a dubauchee, a villain in 
every sense of the word. I still remain such. I sit 
on a lonely crag and too foul smell of carrion delights 
my heart." 

" Ah, my dear," quoth the soft voice of the dove, 
" see me, a lover all my life long ; my lips delighted 



in sweet kisses and my arms in loving embraces. 

Next, in flitted the butterfly, the sole representa- 
tive of the insects : "My life on earth," he said, 
"was joyful; no serious cares ever troubled my 
career ; 1 went through life as it were in a happy 
dream." Thus he spoke and flitted away. 

I was prevented from hearing either the fishes or 
the reptiles, for as soon as the butterfly had flitted 
out, the great multitude of animals immediately 
changed back to their human forms. There was the 
man of the mouse-form with a pinched mean expres- 
sion ; and the foxy man, his sly eyes with their hang- 
dog expression not daring to meet those of any one 
else ; and all the rest of the multitude who as soon 
as they were settled began in one voice to extol the 
charms of the man who had been my guide during 
the evening. '• Look, O mortal, upon the only 
model soul amongst us, while on earth he lived a life 
as nearly perfect as humans are able to live. His 
existence was full of the common cares of life, but 
he braved them as well he might. He was charitable, 
loving, kind, to every living creature ; and above all 
respected himself, thereby promoting respect in 
others." 

As they said this a faint ray of light stole in through 
the window and they disappeared from before it like 
mist before the morning sun, leaving not even a ves- 
tige to mark the place where they had been. 

I remained sitting where I was. The room was 
no longer in the state it had been last night — fur- 
nished very beautifully in the common European 
style, but was devoid of every article of furniture ex- 
cept the chair I was sitting in, which was a poor, old 
thing ready to fall to pieces. The bright sun soon 
took the place of the ray of light. It woke me from 
my revery and I arose, went downstairs through the 
now dismal hall and sauntered slowly home. I had 
learned lessons which I should never forget. V. G. 



AMONG THE FOOTHILLS. 

The Overland Limited of the Union Pacific had 
been held up by a gang of roadagents and robbed of 
$500,000. So complete and unexpected was the 
surprise that no resistance was possible, and the band 
without a single shot being fired, had blown open the 
safe in the baggage car, plundered it, and escaped 
almost before the bewildered passengers had recovered 



AGGIE LIFE. 



8g 



from the surprise occasioned by the appearance of 
armed men at the doors of the cars. 

With their booty the robbers had made for the 
woods while the engineer gathered his wits about him, 
and pulled his train to the nearest station. 

This was on the morning of the — of July. The 
next day the account appeared in the paper, in which 
the blame was largely laid upon the shoulders of the 
innocent and helpless engineer and fireman, who had 
been selected because the blame must be put some- 
where, and the surprise and attack had been so com- 
plete that it was hard to find a sufficient reason for 
placing it elsewhere. 

It was thought that the robbers had escaped into 
the neighboring mountains as, in that region they 
formed the only retreat. This was mere conjecture, 
however, as they had been seen only for a short 
while before they entered the wood that flanked the 
railway at the point of the hold-up. It was also 
thought that the band had horses only a short distance 
away upon which they made their escape, all of which 
would be perfectly likely, and as it was necessary to 
publish something approximating probability, the news- 
papers had seized upon what few details they could 
secure and had made these to blossom as the rose. 
. In bold headlines one morning appeared the following 
startling news : 

" A band of mounted men seen just before dusk 
with pack horses emerging from a gulch etc," The 
report of an eye-witness. 

It turned out afterward that the threatening band 
of the newspaper account was nothing but a party of 
ranchmen. The eye-witness had jollied the reporter 
and, the public had swallowed the pill. 

While excitement was at its highest pitch and 
wonder was expressed that nothing was done to appre- 
hend the robbers if it were a possible thing, a searching 
party had been silently formed under the leadership 
of the best and most skilful scout of all Wyoming. 
So stealthily had the posse been organized and put on 
the march that two days passed by before the news- 
papers got hold of it. It thus happened that no 
reporter got the coveted opportunity of accompanying 
the party on its trip. 

However, it was just as well that none of the tribe 
were with us, and whether we escaped them purposely 
or not, be that as it may, suffice it that we were well 



rid of the decidedly superfluous company of a news- 
paper reporter. 

We started on our trip at dawn of a fine summer 
morning, and made our way along a trail known only 
to our leader, of whom I have already written, and of 
whose superior qualities as a scout, in which profession 
he had become famous, we soon were to get remark- 
able proofs. After leaving the settled districts our path 
lay along the valley of a river basin which following the 
contour of the neighboring hills led us by a consider- 
able detour to a point which our guide assured us was 
the most propitious place for entering the mountains. 

Jim Hooston, or Jim for short, was our guide's 
name and he was as fine a specimen of humanity as 
ever bestrode a horse. His visage was perhaps a 
little stern but a kinder heart never beat than that 
which pulsed the blood through his robust frame. It 
was reported that he was feared far and wide by the 
culprits that sought their safety in the vicinity over 
which he lorded it and that they generally strove to 
escape to a more congenial climate. Such was the 
newspaper statement, at least, a statement designed to 
ridicule the judgment of our guide. But Jim Hooston 
was not to be fooled. Both statements rolled off his 
shoulders, as things do roll according to that common 
simile of the duck, and he continued on with his 
arrangements. Thus it came about, that while the 
newspapers declared it to be utter nonsense, Hooston 
headed directly for the mountains with which he was 
most familiar. 

We camped that night in a little ravine that 
stretched back at right angles from the river's edge 
and was almost completely hidden by the forest trees 
that grew in and around it. We pitched our camp 
just before dusk, tethered our nags, and fell to on the 
cold lunch we had provided. Hardly had we sat down 
when at the bank of the river a canoe appeared and 
gently touched the shore. The stranger disembarked, 
pulled his canoe up the bank and then approached the 
fire. The greetings were friendly and the guest was 
invited to partake of the evening meal. This over 
we took out our pipes and began to smoke, our friend 
doing likewise, The shadows fell quickly and we were 
soon sitting in the darkness of the night. Silence was 
the rule. We did not care to converse for our 
thoughts were of things which it would have been 
folly to discuss in the presence of a stranger, who 



90 



AGGIE LIFE. 



seemed all the more to be distrusted because he vol- 
unteered no information concerning himself. 

However, a lone man is seldom to be feared by a 
party armed as we were and so the stranger was 
welcome according to the hospitality of the plains. 
No questions were asked and no objections offered 
when he requested permission to spend the night ; and 
having finished his pipe he curled himself up in his 
blanket and went to sleep. 

It was my lot to watch that night, but Jim preferred 
to do so. and so I yielded to his wish and judgment. 
Our guest seemed wrapped in soundest slumber when 
we made the rounds to secure the fastening of our 
steeds. Returning from that task we turned in, with 
the exception of the guide, who made himself a 
couch with blankets and saddles, and reclining on 
these again lighted his pipe. 

Everthing was indistinct and shapeless in the twilight 
of the star-lit night when I closed my eyes for sleep. 
Everything promised fair for the morrow. Suddenly 
I awoke with a start, our guest was gone. Jim had 
also disappeared. On the saddle of Jim's couch I 
found this note : " I am on the trail. The man 
sneaked off thinking me asleep. Jim." 

Let us follow the fortunes of the guide comfortably 
settled among his blankets and with only the snoring 
of his comrades, an occasional movement among the 
horses, or the howling of a distant coyote to break the 
stillness. Jim smoked for an hour, absorbed in deep 
thought. The guest lay only a short distance away, 
still, apparently, sound asleep. Jim's pipe had gone 
out and he lay back on his couch. Soon apparently the 
guide was also sound asleep. An hour passed by ; 
the guide had not stirred and still breathed deeply as 
of a man in profound slumber. But Jim Hooston was 
never more wide awake than at that blessed moment. 
The actions of the guest, his reticence particularly, 
had aroused Jim's suspicions, and he waited to see if 
the stranger had any evil intentions against the camp, 
or a purpose to escape under the cover of the night. 

A half hour more passed by,andthen a slight move- 
ment of the form of the stranger put the guide's 
every sense on the alert, though apparently he was 
still asleep. After an interval of five minutes the form 
again moved and soon against the background of the 
river Jim could detect the trunk of a man's body as 
he rose to a sitting posture, All was quiet again for 



a short while and then the stranger quietly unfolded 
his blanket and stood up. Jim could hear the soft 
tread as the stranger carefully approached the river bank 
but he still lay quietly and waited for developments. 
Soon he heard the canoe grate along the sand, and 
saw the stranger apparently push off. To his surprise 
the man still stood on the bank but only for a moment ; 
He then turned and followed the bank of the river till 
lost behind the trees. " A poor plainsman, "Jim thought ; 
" why that empty canoe will signify nothing; the story 
is written in the sand." 

Jim waited a sufficient length of time for the 
stranger to get out of hearing, when he cautiously 
rose, and scribbling in the dark a brief note, entered 
the woods at the remote end of the ravine. Jim fol- 
lowed the stranger for some time, keeping as near 
him as possible, when on entering a small gully the 
man disappeared, and hunt as much as he would Jim 
could not find trace of him nor could he find any 
place of concealment. Suddenly and without warning 
the ground seemed to open and Jim fell to the bot- 
tom of a deep pit. His fall was broken however, by 
alighting on a large pile of furs. Feeling himself over 
in order to satisfy himself that no bones were broken 
he stood up and listened. From the ground under 
his feet the sound of excited voices could be heard. 
Jim's curiosity was aroused, he dropped on his knees 
and began to dig around for some entrance to the 
place from which the voices issued. Success re- 
warded his efforts and he finally raised a trap an d 
cautiously peeked in. Six men were seated around a 
table, and one of them, whom Jim recognized as the 
stranger, was telling them of the pursuing party which 
he had just left. This was enough to tell Jim that he 
had discovered the " den of thieves ;" he quietly low- 
ered the trap and set out to warn his companions. 
Making careful note of the surrounding, to enable him 
to find the cave when he should return, he finally 
reached the camp fire. 

1 had kept awake and saw him when he appeared 
from among the trees. "Wake the boys" said he. 
" I have found the band and if we make a swoop on 
,em we'll git the hull crowd." No sooner said than 
done, we aroused the rest of our party and under the 
leadership of Jim we took up the trail for the robber's 
cave. It was slow and tedious to us. as experienced 
as we were in woodcraft and trail-hunting, and it 



AGGIE LIFE, 



91 



seemed hours before a warning " Hush !" announced 
to us that the coveted goal was near at hand. We 
entered the mouth of the cave and raising the trap 
door demanded a surrender at once. The robbers 
were taken completely by surprise and gave in with- 
out a murmur. 

Not many days after we were each presented with 
a liberal reward by the railroad company for captur- 
ing the robbers and returning the money, and Old Jim 
was held in higher esteem than ever as a scout and 
detective and was elected sheriff of the county. 
He has a generous supply of stories but none are so 
interesting or so well told as the story of how he cap- 
ured " The Train Robbers." 



^olle^^ ^otfs- 



—Basket Ball. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker lectured in Bernardston 
recently. His subject was " Trusts and the Farmer." 

— Prof. Herman Babson will address the Amherst 
High School Debating Club on Friday evening, Jan. 
26th. 

— Elmer D. Howe of Marlboro and J. Howe Dem- 
ond of Northampton have been nominated by Gov. 
Crane for trustees of the college. 

— A resolve has been introduced into the State 
Legislature asking for an appropriation of $8,000 for 
the college annually for four years. 

— The next number of the Union Lecture Course 
is the concert by the Mozart Symphony Club of New 
York and will be given this evening. 

— Representative F. H. Gillett has introduced into 
Congress a bill to grant a pension of $50 per month to 
the widow of Capt. Walter Mason Dickinson. 

— A handicap meet will be held about Feb. 3. 
The new running track is completed and is in first 
class condition. It is being used at present by the 
Amherst College track team as well as our own. 

— On Saturday next at 7-30 p. m. the first inter- 
class athletic meet will be held in the drill-hall. The 
events are as follows : (1) 25 yard dash, (2) 600 yard 
run, (3) 1000 yard run, (4) Shot put, (5) Running 
High Jump, (6) Standing High Jump. (7) Standing 
Broad Jump, (8) Team Races. Entries close to-night. 



— The principal notices upon the bulletin boards 
just at present seem to be " For sale — military uni- 
form." They are all in "good condition " and for 
sale " cheap," 

— On account of complications which have arisen 
the date set for the Military Prom has been changed 
from Friday, Feb. 23d to Wednesday, Feb. 21st. The 
day following is a legal holiday. The Philharmonic 
Orchestra of Springfield will furnish music. 

— At a meeting of the sophomore class held Jan. 
1 1 , the following officers were elected for the ensuing 
term : Pres't, J. C. Hall ; vice-pres't, L. A. Cook ; 
sec'y and treas., A. L. Dacy ; serg't-at-arms, M. A. 
Blake ; polo captain, C. E. Dwyer ; basket ball cap't, 
J. M. Dellea ; base ball cap't, W. Z. Chase ; track 
team cap't. L. C. Claflin. 

— Professor Genung of the English Department of 
Amherst College has been granted a leave of absence 
for six months. Prof. Herman Babson of this college 
has charge of his classes. Prof. D, P. Todd, profes- 
sor of Astronomy and Director of the Observatory at 
Amherst, has started for Europe to observe the eclipse 
of the sun which occurs during the coming spring. 
Prof. J. E. Ostrander of this college will take Prof. 
Todd's place at Amherst during his absence. 

— Mr. James S. Grinnell, one of the trustees of the 
college, has resigned from the State Board of Agri- 
culture. Mr. Grinnell has been a member of the 
board for nearly fifty years and has been for many 
years its vice-president. At the annual meeting of the 
Board the following specialists were unanimously 
re-elected : Chemist, Dr. C. A. Goessmann of M. A. 
C; Entomologist, Prof. C. H. Fernald of M. A. C; 
Botanist and Pomologist, Prof. S. T. Maynard of M. 
A. C; Veterinarian, Dr. J. B. Paige of M. A. C; 
Onithologist, E. H. Forbush of Maiden; Engineer, 
William Wheeler, M. A. C, '71 of Concord. 

— The senior class has elected the following offi- 
cers : Pres't, G. F. Parmenter ; vice-pres't, A. W. 
Morrill ; sec'y and treas., E. T. Hull ; class cap't, H. 
Baker. A committee on class-day exercises was 
appointed as follows : H. Baker, E. K, Atkins and 
the class president. The chairman of the class pho- 
tograph committee is G. F. Parmenter, of the cane 
committee, R. D. Gilbert. The class day speakers 
for commencement are ; Ivy poet, Y, H. Canto ; 



92 



AGGIE LIFE. 



class poet, M. B. Landers ; campus orator ; A. C. 
Monahan ; class orator, A. W. Morrill ; pipe orator, 
J. W. Kellogg ; hatchet orator, A. A. Harmon. 

— The first regular drill under the charge of the 
new Commandant, Capt. John Anderson, was held 
Monday afternoon January 22. The battalion con- 
sists of two campanies. The commissioned officers 
are as follows : Major, F. H. Brown; Captain and Ad- 
jutant, M. B. Landers; Captain Co. A, W. B. Rog- 
ers; Captain Co. B, W. C. Dickerman; Lieutenants 
Co. A, A. C. Wilson and C. E. Gordon ; Lieutenants 
Co. B, N. D. Whitman and E. S. Gamwell. The 
members of the Senior Class have been excused 
from all exercises connected with the Military Depart- 
ment for the remainder of the year. 

— The following men of the Freshman Class have 
joined the Fraternities: D. G. K. — S.C.Bacon, G. L. 
Barrus.E.E.Blake.C. L. Tinkham P. H. Bowler, H.M. 
Cheever, Lee Phillips, E. M. Poole, R.D.Potter, H.L. 
Richardson, R. N. Robertson, L. I. Thompson, C. A. 
Tinker, F. W. Webster. Q. T. V.— H. C. Bowen, 
P. W. Brooks, H. J. Franklin, G. D. Jones, E. B. 
Snell, W. E. Tottingham, M. H. West. C. S. C— 
J. G. Cook, H. T. Martin, N. F. Monahan, W. W. 
Peebles. A. A. Phelps. $ 2 K— H. T. Kelley, E. L. 
Perkins, E. G. Proulx, W. Tower. F. R. Church and 
T. M. Carpenter of the Sophomore class have joined 
the C. S. C. 



ImprfsS'O'^S o"f ^^ Idler. 



The Idler has often sat far into the night pondering 
over problems that never seemed quite clear to him. 
Among other questions that he has asked himself was 
what is the work that athletics is designed to perform 
for the college ? The answers that have presented 
themselves to this question have been numerous but 
none seemed complete. One that was presented with 
much zest by a certain enthusiast particularly inter- 
ested the Idler as it seemed to prove a sufficient rea- 
son why the college should send out a Basket Ball 
team. The statement was that " athletics bring honor 
and glory to the college." After much consideration 
of this apparently most lurid expression the Idler is 
made to see in It anything other than possibilities 



clothed in fallacies. First, the Idler has asked him- 
self does all athletics bring honor to the college. 
Does the college reap any special benefit from engag- 
ing in athletic contests with men who not only are not 
acquainted with the scientific principles of the game 
which they play but also by a pre-arranged plan devi- 
ate from the rules of that game just sufficient to turn 
it into a prize fight ? The conclusion which the Idler 
has reached is that the college does not. The result 
of the basket ball games thus far this season seems 
to bear out this conclusion. We have authorized the 
organization of a basket ball team to represent the 
college without making any provision for the mainte- 
nance of that team. By so doing we have placed 
before the management of the teams the temptation 
to accept offers of games which were advantageous 
to the team from a financial point of view whether 
they come from our equals or not. Athletic teams 
cannot be run without an expense and the college that 
tries to impose upon others must soon come to grief. 
If we are going to have a basket ball team the Idler 
suggests by all means that we furnish them with funds 
sufficient to make them independent of the few dollars 
over expenses that can be obtained from scrub teams. 
The college should take a firm stand against playing 
undesirable teams and hold managers responsible for 
carrying out their wishes. Only by so doing can we 
avoid a repetition of the occurrences of last 
Wednesday. 

The Idler has recently heard distant rumblings that 
seem to foretell the coming of some dire catastrophe. 
As he passed a small group of freshmen a few days 
ago he heard such words as pledge, injustice, in tones 
that seemed to indicate a very troubled spirit some- 
where. Now the Idler has heard much of this pledge 
that the three lower classes have signed but has never 
seriously considered it. What does it mean ? From 
the faculty he understands that it pledges a man not 
to do what his own reason would tell him was wrong. 
From the Freshmen he understands that it is a very 
ambiguous promise which can be easily misconstrued 
so as to mean several things which it originally was 
not intended to mean. If this is so the injured parties 
have the Idler's sympathy but he nevertheless wishes 
to offer some advice. Freshmen, you have given 
your promise not to do certain things. Obey the 
spirit rather than the letter of your pledge. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



93 



/Ithlctic No*^$- 



At a meeting of the college last term it was voted 
to support a varsity Basket Ball Team. A captain 
and manager was elected, he arranged his schedule 
and four games have been played one game being won 
out of the series. This record is not at all encourag- 
ing to say the least, and since one of the games lost 
was to Williston by a bad score ; the team has lost 
the confidence of the college. The last game, which 
was played in Chicopee, showed us very clearly that 
basket ball in this college was almost an impossibility. 
To be sure we can pick fine men to represent us 
but it is out of the question for us to even think of 
putting out a team that can compete with the veteran 
teams in our vicinity. 

Aggie 14; Y. M. C. A. 9. 

The first game was played on the Drill hall floor on 
Wednesday Jan. 10 with Northampton Y. M. C. A. 
The game was uninteresting from the start, the home 
team playing by far the better game. The referee 
acting for the Y. M. C. A's. persisted in calling fouls 
on Aggie for every bit of roughness much to the dis- 
gust of the crowd. Dellea played the best game for 
Aggie and was seconded by Hall in second half. 

Ware 26 ; Aggie 4. 
The game with Ware played on Jan. 13, was not 
to be called basket ball, but was more like a game of 
foot ball. From the start Ware showed that they 
played the game with rules of their own, and as the 
referee showed no disposition to penalize them the 
Aggie team was at their mercy. The game for the 
first half was a revelation to our boys and the Ware 
team succeeded in throwing six goals. In the second 
half the team resolved to use the same tactics as 
they were getting and as a result the game ended in 
a general scrap. The line up was as follows : 

WARE. AGGIE. 

Buckley, 1. f., r. g., Dellea 

Haley, f f., c. g., Mc Cobb 

Riley, c, c, Rice 

M. Buckley, c. g., 1. f., Halligan 

Boyer, r. g., r. f. Chase 

Williston 21 ; Aggie 4. 
Williston defeated the home team in the Drill hall 
Jan. 17. The game was uninteresting only in the fact 



that Williston gave an exhibition of dirty muckerism. 
The line up was as follows : 



AGGIE. 

Dellea, 1. f.. 
Hall Mc Cobb, r. f., 
Morrill and Rice, c, 
Chickering, 1. g.. 
Chase, r. g.. 



WILLISTON. 

r. g., Neile 

1. g., Dibble 

c.Cox 

r. f., Glenny 

1. f., Crawford 



IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL ALUMNI. 

The annual business meeting and banquet of the 
Mass. Agricultural College Alumni Association of 
Massachusetts will be held at the Quincy House, 
Boston, on Friday evening, Jan. 26, 1900. Business 
meeting at 6 p. m.; banquet at 7 p. m. This year a 
special effort is being made to bring as many as pos- 
sible of the alumni and faculty of the college together. 
It is hoped that each alumnus and former student will 
come, and try and bring some of his classmates. 
The committee on arrangements have arranged for a 
first class banquet, with special musical features. 
President Goodell has signified his intention of attend- 
ing, and other members of the faculty, past and pres- 
ent will be with us. Remember the invitation to this 
banquet and business meeting is extended to all grad- 
uates, former students and faculty of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. It will be the time and 
place to meet some of your class-mates, society men 
and friends. Don't forget the time and place, January 
26, 1900, 6 P. M., Quincy House, Boston, Mass. 
Dinner Tickets, $2.00. 

Very truly yours, 

S. C. Damon, President. 
John Marshall Barry, Clerk. 

Mass. Agr. College Alumni Association of Mass. 

^ 

RESOLUTIONS. 

In consideration of the actions of the men representing 
Williston Seminary at the M. A. C. — Williston basket ball 
game played at Amherst on Jan. 17, 1900, which actions we, 
the students of the M. A. C, regard as disorderly and inde- 
cent and highly discourteous and insulting to the M. A. C, 
to her instructors, and to her undergraduates, therefore, be it 

Resolved, that all athletic relations between the M. A. C. 
and Williston Seminary be discontinued end, be it also 

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be given to Pres't 
H. H. Goodell of the M. A. C. and that a copy be placed on 
file with the records of the M. A. C. Athletic Board. 

At a mass meeting held Jan. 22 the above resolu- 
tions were unanimously adopted. 



94 



AGGIE LIFE. 



NEW YEAR'S THOUGHTS. 

Many of the memories of the past 

To-night as they come back, 
Burdened with hopes that did not last 

Bear heavily o'er the beaten track. 
But since the fates have thrown us thither 

While spells bind us fast 
Let's wander aimlessly whither 

The future turns fondly to the past. 
If we could blot out the memory 

Of all the wrongs we have met 
Still would their shadows playing .dimly 

Deep in our thoughts linger yet. 



H. G. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



Bacteria by George Newman, M. D. of Kings Col- 
lege, London. This book shows the economic value 
of bacteria from a different standpoint than that from 
which it is generally represented. Bacteria medica 
holds a less prominent position than is usual in 
treatises on this subject and instead is a discussion of 
a more popular and less technical theme, that of 
bacteria as they are related to the economy of nature 
and to the industrial processes. The most interest- 
ing phases of the subject which the author discusses 
is the biology of bacteria, bacteria in water, air, soil 
and in milk and its products. Bacteria and disease 
and disenfection is lightly touched upon in the last 
two chapters. The book is No. 6 of the Science 
Series. 

Inorganic Chemistry for Advanced Students by 
Roscoe and Hardin. This book is for the use of stu- 
dents who have mastered the elementary portion of 
chemical science. It is divided into thirty-nine les- 
sons, the elements treated of being grouped according 
to the periodic system of classification while several 
chapters on chemical theory are dispersed among the 
rest. The chief points discussed in these chapters on 
chemical theory are atomic and molecular weights, 
specific and atomic heat, crystals and isomorphism, 
valency, dissociation, thermo-chemistry, electro chem- 
istry, the periodic law and spectrum analysis. Other 
chapters are on the application of chemistry to the 
arts and industries. Undoubtedly the book will be 
very popular with students of chemistry on account of 
the ground which it covers and its general compre- 
hensiveness. 



Evolution by Atrophy in Biology and Sociology by 
Demoor. International Science Series. The basis 
of this work is the analogy existing between biology 
and sociology from the point of view of evolution. A 
slight confusion arises as to whether societies should 
be regarded as organisms or particular kinds of 
societies. It is however conceded that there are many 
characters in common between these two elements. 
The book is divided into three parts entitled The 
Universality of Degenerate Evolution, The Path of 
Degenerate Evolution and The Causes of Degenerate 
Evolution. The author's conclusions are logical and 
arrived at only after an extended study of the subject. 
He finds that degenerate evolution exists everywhere 
and that it does not occur by accident but through a 
natural process and for a purpose — usually in the 
interests of some more powerful organism. Degener- 
ation is not an actual retracing of steps and once an 
organism has passed a stage in the process of pro- 
gressive evolution it can never again be in identically 
the same stage although it may pass through a more 
or less similar one. When an institution through 
degenerate evolution ceases to be functional or in 
any way useful it very soon disappears altogether. 
This rule does not always hold true for in some cases 
insignificant vestiges remain which never entirely dis- 
appear. " Thus the survival of festivals, customs and 
traditions while the religion and civilization which pro- 
duced them have passed away, is the principal link 
which connects us with bygone generations. Society 
itself constitutes history. The mirror of the past is 
exhibited in the consciousness of the collective indi- 
vidual which is called a nation," 



£^cK^lrl^^S- 



The aims of education should be to convert the 
mind into a living fountain, and not a reservoir. 
That which is filled by merely pumping in will be 
emptied by pumping out.— John M. Mason. 

This is a pertinent Exchange article. We are 
students and are engaged in filling our brains with 
knowledge. In the midst of nearly every student 
community is a means by which the mind may be 
made " a living fountain," This is your student paper. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



95 



Use it ; by hard work along certain lines we learn 
what we know, for by using what we learn we attain 
to that position of knowing what we know, and more, 
we learn what it would be for our advantage to know, 
and further we learn to apply what we know. " Don't 
fall into the vulgar idea that the mind is a warehouse, 
and education but a process of stuffing it full of goods." 

The account of the canoe trip on the Concord and 
Merrimac rivers in the Concord High School Noice 
possesses the merit of raciness and a conversational 
quality which academic papers with their academic 
styles seldom give us, except when they get down to 
the naturalness of the gossip page. Although we can- 
not say that the article is particularly interesting from 
the point of view of subject matter, yet it smacks of 
the homely way a boy would tell of such a trip and is 
insomuch of interest. 

From the Tech: — In making a brief retrospect of 
the term, considerable progress cannot fail to be 
noticed in athletics, society, undergraduate and alumni 
work, and especially the latter." In way of comment 
we would say that we think the increased interest of 
the alumni an indication of the more prosperous times. 
Surely there ought to be a manifestation of interest 
among them at such a time ; if they still retain their 
interest. 

" Indian Summer " in the Abbott Courant is beauti- 
ful in its appreciation of that most charming season. 

To the Distaff : We would like to know the name 
of the author or the lines beginning : 

" A parting tear the old year sheds 
And then is gone ; — " 

We wonder if it was all a dream. Our manager 
says it must have been. An Exchange says : 

• ' We had a dream the other night. 

When all around was still, 
We dreamed that each subscriber came 

Right up and paid his bill." 

The story entitled "The Fourth Member" in the 
Herald is by no means a bad yarn. 

We have on our table The Imp of the Brighton 
High School. Hard luck to be so represented. En 
evant toujours is the motto on the cover. Well said. 



Alu 



mm. 



The annual banquet of the Massachusetts Agricult- 
ural College Alumni Club of Massachusetts will be 
held at the Quincy House, Boston, Mass., January 
26, 1900. Business meeting at 6 p. m. Banquet at 
7 p. M. 

73. — S. S. Warner was elected secretary of the 
Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden Agricultural soci- 
ety on January 3, 1900. Address: Northampton, 
Mass. 

78. — W. L. Boutwell of Leverett, Mass., has just 
been appointed trustee of the Franklin Agricultural 
society. 

79. — Richard S. Dickinson was at the college last 
week. Mr. Dickinson was quite a stranger, it having 
been about twenty years since he was here before. 
He seemed very much pleased with the changes that 
have taken place since he was a student at M. A. C. 

'82. — C. D. Hillman has changed his address to 
Watsonville, Cal., P. O box 47, at which place he is 
engaged in the nursery and farming business. 

'83. — Dr. J. B. Lindsey is gradually recovering 
from his long siege of sickness and it is the expecta- 
tion of his friends that the approach of warm weather 
will find him in his accustomed place at the Experi- 
ment Station. Address ; Dr. Strong's Sanitarium, 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

'85. — Dr. E. W. Allen,assistant director, office ex- 
periment stations, Washington, D. C, was recently 
at the Experiment station. 

'88. — Wm. M. Shepardson, superintendent " Tran- 
quility Farm," Middlebury, Connecticut. Mr. Shep- 
ardson contemplates erecting a dairy building and 
during the past week has inspected the dairy building 
connected with the Experiment station. 

'88. — ^J. E. Holt of Andover, Mass. was in town 
recently. 

'89. — D. L. Hubbard, civil engineer, city engi- 
neer's office, Boston, Mass., spent Christmas at the 
home of his uncle in Amherst. 

'89. — C. S. Crocker, assistant chemist, L. B. 
Darling Fertilizer Co., Pawtucket, R. I., spent Christ- 
mas at the home of Rev. E. W. Gaylord in North 
Amherst. 



gG 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'91. — A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. M. A. 
Carpenter, at Mt. Auburn, Mass., on January 8, 1900. 

'92. — J. B. Knight is pursuing a course in Ento- 
tomology, Chemistry and Botany at M. A. C. for the 
PhD degree. 

'92. — Milton H. Williams, veterinarian, Sunderland, 
Mass. 

'93. — A. E. Melendy is with the firm of Washburn 
& Moen, Worcester, Mass. Address, 4 Dover St., 
Worcester, Mass. 

'93. — Franklin S. Hoyt, supervising principal of one 
of the school districts in New Haven, Conn. 

'94. — F. G. Averell, who is with the Stone & 
Downer Co., Custom House Brokers, 53 State St., 
Boston Mass.. spent Christmas at his former home in 
Amherst. 

'95.;— M.J.Sullivan, superintendent " Rocks Farm," 
Littleton, N. H., was visiting in town. 

'95. — G. A. Billings, teacher in Baron de Hirsch 
Agricultural and Mechanical school. Woodbine, N. J. 

'95. — Edward A. White, clerk in Boston store, 
Hartford, Conn. 

'95. — D. C. Potter, superintendent " Pope Farm." 
Mr. Potter is also expecting to add a dairy building to 
his equipment, and in company with Shepardson, '88, 
has been inspecting the dairy building at the station, 
to get ideas for construction. They further expect to 
visit the various dairy establishments in Lowell, Mass., 
Burlington, Vt., etc., and investigate the methods em- 
ployed in the making of butter and cheese, and in the 
care of milk. 

'96. — The engagement is announced of B. K. 
Jones of the Hatch Experiment station to Miss H 
Louise Roper, a student at Mt. Holyoke college with 
home in Barre, Mass. 

'97. — H.J. Armstrong, civil engineer, Bellville, 111. 
has been spending a two weeks' vacation about Am- 
herst, and his home in Sunderland. 

'98.— On New Years eve C. G. Clark of Sun- 
derland was married to Miss Minnie Claire Ball at the 
home of the bride in Montague. Mr. Clark is en- 
gaged in the market gardening business in Sunder- 
land, Mass. 

'99. — H. W. Dana has accepted a position as as- 
sistant commercial editor in the employ of the Phelps 
Publishing Company, Springfield, Mass. 



'99. — F. A. Merrill of New York city was recently 
in town. 

'99. — E. H. Sharpe is assisting in the Botanical 
laboratory at the College. 

'99. — B. H. Smith, formerly assistant in Chemis- 
try at the College, was married to Miss Lilla Brown 
of Amherst, on January 3, 1900. Mr. Smith has re- 
signed his position as assistant in chemistry and has 
settled in Springfield. Mass., having entered the em- 
ploy of the Danbury Hat Co. of that city. Address. 
478 Main St., Springfield, Mass. 



The Rub Down 

Is as good as the exercise. Its good is 
doubled if you rub the tired muscles with 



(Johnsons 

ApodyncLINIMENT 



Endorsed by leading instructors and 
athletes in every line of sport. Ninety 
years record for the cure of sprains, bruises, 
and all inflammation. Sold by druggists. 
Two size bottles— 25 cents or 60 cents. 

I. S. JOHNSON & CO, Boston, Mass. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



50 YEARS' , 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
gulckly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securingpatents, 

Patents taken through Munn & Co, 



special notice, without charge, in the 



receive 



Scientific American. 



A handsomely Illustrated weekly. 



Largest cir- 
Terms, $3 a 



culation of any Bcientiflc journal. 

year ; four months, $h Sold by all newsdealers. 

MIINN8Co.3«'Broadway.NewYork 

Branch Office, 626 F St., Washington. D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 eta. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Eememter these suits arei^resserf not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Wc Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand' 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St.. Chicago. 



TEAOHERS WANTED! 

DNION TEBG^ERS' B6E)IGIES OF HPIEQIGfl. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



PitSshurg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York,- Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to he filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHIflGTON, D. C, OP PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROW]Sr, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



CuTLEB'fl Block, 



AMHEB8T, Mass 



Office Houkb : 9 a. m. to J r. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Magi. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Start in Basiness for Yoarself . 



SUCCESS ASSUMED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



DARRAGH & RICH, 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New Yobk Citt. 



J. H. Tt^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
DEVLEB IN STOYES HND BRN&ES. 

AGENT FOB THE CELEBKATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 564. 



C R. ELDER, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lo'velly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHEKST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 

•FASHIONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY 

^P" All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^1 
Savings Bake Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehusetts flgpieultopal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Perchiiroii Horses and Soutndoi Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



Aggie LiFfi. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Kote Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 

-W. Vr. BOYBTTOM', 

MANtJFACTUKEK OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RiVEK Street, 



NOKTHAMPTON, MASS. 



E. B. SICKIN5DN, Q. B. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Houkb : 
9 to is a.. i^., 1-30 to s f. 1*1. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 

BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 

A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBEI3 <3-003D3. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JI^Repairinff done while you waittSt 
9 P SUE NIX MOW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

A.XITT aTMUMT, AXMERST, JKASa, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 
i 



FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 



Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-Operati¥e Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatini Establishment, 



A.siSi^^ A.s:^*^'t9 



ir. i^. oieA.:ivE> »oo 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S-^sSA-TISFA-OTIOIT a-XTA.IlA.3SrTBBID. 4^^ 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



-^PartnUiie's WetlG OQtflttis.* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, 



BoaxoN, xjiaa. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. KELTON. 



R. F. KELTON & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PODLTBY, YEGETHBLES, FISP WD OYSTEQS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



SCKX££ARi:'S 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Sociaty, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attantion glTan to students. 



let IIMIS iXBEET, NORTHAMPTOK, MABS. 

Telephone connection. 



AlMS^P^KSrwe' 




Consider— If you can'keep'tlio'wetout 'y 

of your rifle it mil not rustnoxfreeze. Only Aii 

Marlin Repeaters I 

have Solid Tops, shedding water like a f 

duck's back. Out 197-page book (.iust out) _- 

tells all about them. Up-to-date infer- p/ 

mation about powders.black and smoke- . / 

less; proper sizes, quantities, how to Jr 

load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, ff 

jacketed, soft^nosed, mushroom, etc.: '•> 

traj ectorles, yelocities, penetrations. All jii 



%$\j''r«e if you will send stamps for postage to 
■.' The Marlia Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



The M. N. Spear Book Store. 

ESTABLISHED FIFTY TEARS. 

Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPEGIALTY-M. A. C, STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

1= EC O T O C3- IB -A- 1= KC E 13 . 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, $2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
Studio, 17 Spring Street, - - jLIUSJEBST, MA.SS. 



Hmberet Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manaobr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITUREJIND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, MattreBses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. RAWSON, 



DEALER IN 



WflTGHES, GIiOGKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LABOE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, tc. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STBAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



WE make:- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The florthamptoD M Store. 

li. R. CHEW, Manager. 

CoR. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 

MASS.JIGRICDLTU1(AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

W« would inform the friends of the college, and the publl* 
generally, that we are prepared to supply- 
in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PBICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, addrei* 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHrnnrnT, uAam. 



^ TAI LOR> 

Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS» 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



/nbaeeacbueette 

HGttcultural 

ColiCQC 



OFFEIR 



1. A SHOH>T WINTER COUUSE of eleven weeka in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOUK TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, Engli&h 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



A.-^^' 



Jr i /' 



^ 








■MASS 

Feb. 7, 






>i^ ^* 



NO. 9. 



CLOXHINO FURNISH IN OS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold- We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest ol new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be light. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all jon can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



Annasf , Aa$$. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Ca?idies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 






kc^ r ^ 



Winter Rtisset Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.§o to $^.00. 



R EIPAI R I N 0.^===^^ 

New Soles and Heels, 76c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 



Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



COLLEE 
JEWELER 



COLLEGE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

4®"EYES FITTED FUEE.^®* 
By a graduate of Dii. Fosteb, Occulist. 



I have the ainmnnition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




•^2:::;;;;^ 



HARRY CLARK, 

UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 7, 1900 



NO. 9 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications sheuld be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
t« »1I subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT CORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: fl.OO per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o{ United States and Canada, 2gc. extra. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. .athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and On* Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 

College Boarding Club, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Pest Office as sec«nd-class mail matter. 



Cd'a'torials. 



The date of the Winter Prom, is fast approach- 
ing and the management wishes to extend to all the 
alumni a cordial invitation to be present. The pre- 
liminary dance orders have been issued in advance so 
'that all may have an opportunity of taking the greatest 
possible pleasure out of the event. 



At the Alumni Banquet held at the Quincy House, 
Boston, Jan. 26, a suggestion worthy of consideration 
was brought forward. The suggestion was that the 
college hold during the summer months a school for 
the instruction of the teachers from all over this state 
who desire to come. This would bring the college in 
touch with the public schools and be a means of 
increasing the number of students. In connection 
with this was suggested that the college issue bulletins 
on nature studies. Both of these things have been 
done in other states and have been found to be pro- 
ductive of good results. 



The first athletic meet of the winter was held in 
the Drill Hall on Jan. 27 and another one will be 
held on Feb. 10. The meet upon Feb. 10 will be a 
handicap meet and should be well attended as 
handicaps are to be given so that all contestants will 
have a chance of winning. The object of these 
handicap meets is to bring out talent that would 
otherwise never be appreciated. By continuing this 
work and varying the programme slightly we can 
keep alive an interest in athletics that will greatly aid 
us in the work of the Spring. 



Now that the winter has settled down the Life 
thinks that some effort should be made to keep the 
walks free from snow. Of the walks on the college 
grounds not more than one-third have been kept pas- 
sible this winter. It seems as though the walk 
between the Chapel and the veterinary laboratory has 
sufficient traffic over it to give a good return for the 
work expended in clearing it. The new board walk 
which has but a short time ago been put between the 
North College and the boarding house should not be 



98 



AGGIE LIFE. 



allowed to remain unused because of the accumula- 
tion of ice and snow upon it. In connection with this 
walk there is one matter that has to do with keeping 
the grounds in good condition. Where the board 
walk connects with the tar walk upon the north side of 
the ravine, there has been in the spring more or 
less walking across the lawn, until now it presents 
in summer a very unsatisfactory appearance. What 
the Life wishes to suggest is that an ornamental 
shrub be planted on this lawn so as to act as a barrier 
to those who try to walk on it. In this way we would 
be preserving the natural beauty of the grounds in a 
part where we could well appreciate it. 



THE WEBSTER HOMESTEAD. 

As the horses sweat and work drawing us up the 
stony, dusty road between steep sand embankments, 
which seemed to quiver and wave slowly in the hot 
sunshine, one of the party wonderingly remarks, how 
strange it seemed that Daniel Webster should have 
wished to have lived in such a hot, dusty town as 
Marshfield seems to be. But when we arrive at the 
top of the hill all wonder ceases at the magnificent 
view spread out before us. The trees which for some 
distance back lined the road end here, and a wide view is 
given across the country. Sloping away, almost from 
our very feet, is a large peach-orchard, then a cleared 
field, and beyond a grove of large elms through which 
glimpses of the Webster house, large and many 
gabled, can be gained. Behind the house are the 
barns. A short distance behind the barns is an arti- 
ficial pond from the farther shore of which rises, by a 
gradual slope, a low hill. The top of the hill is crowned 
with a small cemetery in which is the grave of the 
great statesman. A little to the right of this hill, the 
eye has a clean sweep to the ocean, across the green 
meadows broken only now and then by large hay- 
barns and by Green river, winding peacefully to the 
sea as if conscious that it will no longer have to battle 
daily with the tide, that is now kept back by the dikes. 
This Green river, which seems so small and deserted 
now was once a busy anchorage. There Webster's 
yacht, the Lapwing, used to swing at her moorings in 
company with several other yachts owned about there 
and a small fleet of fishing vessels. At that time, 
before the dike was built, the tides daily covered the 



flats and then the meadows or rather marshes, which 
gave the name to the town, were brown and barren- 
not under cultivation as at the present time. 

But finally we drive on to the entrance of the Web- 
ster estate, when the horses are turned and we drive 
down a broad gravel-road bordered with large elms. 
As the horses walk slowly down the drive toward the 
house, one of the party tells this story of the present 
owner of the Webster place, Mr. Walton Hall : When 
Mr. Hall was a boy he walked from down Cape Cod 
to Boston where he expected to find employment. 
As he tramped along, the road he passed the Webster 
place with its large, pleasant house, roomy barns, and 
well tilled fields. Then and there Mr. Hall mentally 
promised himself that some time that place should be 
his. Time passed, Mr. Hall succeeded and when the 
place came to change hands, he purchased it. By 
the end of this story we arrive at the house where we 
dismount from the carriage. The building is large, 
two stories in height, the monotony of the long roof 
being relieved by a number of dormer windows. A 
wide piazza runs along the south and east side of the 
house. 

We walk along the piazza to the south side of the 
house to the front door, which opens into a large hall, 
which extends far back through the house. On both 
sides of the hall there are wide doors, the one to the 
left leading into a parlor, the other to the right lead- 
ing into a reception or rather relic room, while from 
the rear of the hall a broad hard wood flight of stairs 
is seen leading to the second story. In the hall the 
first things of interest that strike our eye are the large 
paintings of some members of the Webster family, 
As we enter the reception room, many things of great 
interest are seen. In the center of the room is a 
large, solid, hard wood table which, as the plate set 
in the top says, was given to Daniel Webster by some 
workingmen's organization, as an expression of their 
gratitude for his having defended their rights. There 
also- is a miniature reproduction of Bunker Hill Mon- 
ument Association. There in the corner by the fire- 
place is Webster's old reading-chair, large, roomy and 
leather covered. It's foot-rest is so arranged that it 
can be raised or lowered at the pleasure of the user. 
Probably the great statesman spent many hours in 
that chair, with his feet on the rest, while he was read- 
ing some thick book of law or the works of some of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



09 



the great writers that lay open before him on the 
book-rest attached to the side of the chair. In a 
glass case on the wall is a collection for South Amer- 
ican butter-flies, so well arranged as to merit the 
time-worn expression, " as prettj' as a picture." This 
collection was presented to Mr. Webster by the un- 
fortunate emperor of Brazil, Don Pedro, who, on his 
visit to this country, formed a warm liking for Mr. 
Webster, There are also other things of great inter- 
est in the room referring to Mr. Webster, but I be- 
came interested in some stone implements which Mr. 
Hall said he had picked up where his men were 
ploughing on the hillside a distance back on the farm. 
From the implements found at that place Mr. Hall 
thought that probably there had once been a battle on 
that place between two hostile tribes of Indians. 

After looking about the rooms a few minutes longer 
we went out to the barn to see the old Webster 
coach and incidentally to see Mr. Hall's stock. 
The coach is a large, heavy affair, which in point of 
weight compares favorably with the present automo- 
biles, but instead of being propelled over the road by 
compressed air or motor power, was intended to be 
drawn by a pair of powerful horses. The body in 
place of being on springs is hung on leather straps. 
The carriage is a relic of the past now, but in its day 
was a gem of the carriage maker's art. There also 
was the plough that Webster used on the farm. It 
was made by himself, a large clumsy affair of wood 
and iron. Evidently Mr. Webster had plenty of iron 
and unlimited confidence in the powerof his team. 

Then we walked across the dam of the pond, stay- 
ing there a few minutes to see the trout with which 
the pond is plentifully stocked, and then up the hill to 
the cemetery, where we paused before the grave of 
the Great Statesman. But it was getting toward sun- 
set and we did not stay to visit any other points that 
day but walked back to our carriage, bade good-day to 
Mr. Hall and started on our drive home. 



FOUND— A HANDKERCHIEF. 

A look of annoyance passed over the principal's 
face. 

" So your orchard was visited again last night, Mr. 
Roberts? " he asked. 

" Wall, I sh'd say so," was the response. "Not 



enough left to shake a stick at. They took all my 
Porters — nice big ones worth $3 easy — and a lot of 
Seckels and — " 

" But what reason have you for thinking that one of 
our students was concerned in the affair ? Quite pos- 
sibly it is the work of some of your neighbors." 

" Mebbe p'r'aps it is and tnen again, p'r'aps it aint. 
I notice that my stuff don't get touched without the 
academy's runnin' though. But what's more to the 
p'int, the varmints got kinder hard-pressed last night 
my man he come out on 'em sudden like — and they 
knocked him down and stuffed a handkerchief in his 
mouth, and I've got the handkerchief!" 

" Ah ! and is there a name on it, Mr, Roberts ?" 

" Wall no, there aint no name, but there's what's 
jest as good, a laundry mark, 1 1 H, I b'lieve it is, and 
you can sort of trace it by that." 

" I see. Perhaps I had better attend to the matter 
at once. This business has gone far enough and my 
students must stop it. If I find that any of them 
were concerned in this outrage, rest assured that the 
guilty parties will be dealt with summarily. I will see 
that you have no further trouble from us," said the 
principal, as the farmer left the office. 

" There was a good deal of suppressed excitement 
among the students that morning. Mr. Roberts's visit 
had been duly noted and commented on, and the gen- 
eral idea was that some one had been caught. A 
guilty conscience made many uneasy, and everyone 
was full of curiosity, intensified as it was seen that 
the teachers looked unusually grave. The chapel 
exercises never dragged as they did that day ; but at 
last they came to a close. The bell for dismissal did 
not ring, and the tension rose to the highest pitch as 
the principal briefly outlined the events of the night 
before. 

" I have despatched a messenger to the laundry 
office and he will return presently. In the meantime, 
should any among you be willing to acknowledge your 
part in the affair, I stand ready to listen." 

Five minutes passed, then ten, then fifteen, but no 
one stirred. Then a commotion at the entrance told 
that the messenger had arrived. The stillness became 
even greater as the lad went forward. 

" Did the handkerchief belong to a person con- 
nected with the academy?" demanded the principal. 

" Why, yes, sir, but — " 



lOO 



AGGIE LIFE. 



" No ' buts ' please. The owner is doubtless one 
of the guilty parties, I regret that we have such a 
character in our school. You may tell me his name." 

The students though straining ears and eyes could 
not from where they sat catch the name ; but they 
saw the dignified principal jump, as one boy expressed 
it, " as though he had been struck by lightning." A 
look of bewilderment and incredulity was on his face. 
At length he recovered himself sufficently to say : 

" There has been some mistake in the matter and 
1 fear the handkerchief does not aid us so much as 
we had hoped. The classes are dismissed." 

The students filed out in a highly excited state of 
mind. Outside of the door they fairly overwhelmed 
the luckless messenger with questions as to what it all 
meant. - For some reason he burst into a violent fit 
of laughter and was consequently quite unable to say 
a word. Finally he managed to gasp out — " Profes- 
sor Newton " — and then began to laugh again more 
heartily than ever. 

"Professor Newton?" "What?" "Who?" 
came the questions, thick and fast. 

"Yes. you big idiots! Professor Newton! it was 
his handkerchief ! Oh, golly, what a joke ! " 

They understood at last, and then they, too, 
laughed long and heartily. And well they might, for 
Prof. Newton was sixty years of age, a deacon in the 
church, and by all odds the staidest, strictest and 
most eminently respectable of all the members of the 
Faculty. 

The principal did his best to unearth the real cul- 
prits but he was unsuccessful. The studeut body 
affected to believe that the Professor was really to 
blame while outsiders looked upon it as an inexpli- 
cable mystery. The only remarks that ever threw 
any light on the subject were made late that night in 
the seclusion of one of the rooms. Said student No. 
1, " It's mighty lucky I used that handkerchief instead 
of my own ;" and his room-mate answered, " Well, 
you see you can get some good out of everything even 
a mixed-up laundry bundle." 



" Out of 80,000 college students in the United 
States more than 2 1 ,000 are from the agricultural 
classes. The largest per cent., 50.9, is in the South ; 
in the West, 48.5 ; while New England has only a 
per cent, of 29.1." — Ex. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Berlin, Germany, Dgcember, 1899. 
To THE Editor of the Aggie Life : 
My Dear Sir : 

In my last letter 1 related some of the first 
impressions 1 received on my arrival in Gottingen, after 
an absence of forty years. A month's residence since, 
within its walls, has materially increased my apprecia- 
tion of its claim as a desirable German university for 
American students, and the present number of stu- 
dents, as well as their registration in past years in a 
number of the ^prominent departments, bears testi- 
mony in this direction. 

Soon after the beginning of the winter term of lec- 
tures, I was honored by a call from the present Patri- 
arch of the American colony of students, Mr. John 
R. Benton, who kindly offered his assistance in provid- 
ing for my comfort, and extended to me an invitation 
to be present at a dinner arranged for the introduction 
of newly arrived American students and I need but 
say that the occasion proved a very enjoyable one. 
Twenty-two participated in the dinner, eighteen of 
them being new arrivals at the university. Eight had 
registered as classic students of philology, three of 
medicine, two of chemistry, two of physics, one of 
law, one of botany and one of zoology, all coming 
from different parts of the United States, 

There are fifty-three Americans reported living in 
Goottingen during the present winter term, not as 
many as during the preceeding summer term, for dur- 
ing the latter term the registration is as a rule smal- 
ler. The return of some of the professors from their 
vacation gave me a good opportunity to visit the well 
equipped Agricultural institutions of the university, 
accompanied by the heads of the different departments. 
My reception was in every case most cordial, and it 
was with particular satisfaction that 1 listened to the 
favorable expressions of the professors regarding the 
earnest efforts of the graduates of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College who, for more than twenty-five 
years, almost without any interruption, have left their 
records at this reputed seat of learning. 

Professor Tollens showed me his labratory and fine 
collection of apparatus, many of original design, relat- 
ing his recent interesting observations regarding the 
chemistry of carbohydrates and the improvements in 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lOI 



ash analysis for strictly scientific purposes. I spent a 
very pleasant evening with him at a party given by 
the daughters of our old teacher Wohler. Professor 
F. Lehmann, the pupil and successor of Henneberg, 
in the stock feeding department, conducted me through 
his laboratories and feeding arrangements, explaining 
his recent observations concerning the food value of 
the various by-products of the beet sugar industry, 
including dried refuse of abstracted beet roots, beet 
sugar, molasses, dried leaves of sugar beet roots, when 
used as fodder for farm live-stock in connection with 
by-products of flour, starch, glucose and oil industries, 
a most important topic in beet-sugar producing 
countries. 

Professor von Seelhorst kindly conducted me 
through his fields and glass houses, explaining his 
various lines of observation in plant-production. His 
fields of observation are models of systematic arrange- 
ment and of skillful management, Economical sys- 
tems of rotation of crops ; his production of well 
defined strains of prominent grain crops, for the gen- 
eral market, the effect of the essential articles of 
plant-food, single and compound, in presence of vary- 
ing, but well-defined quantities of water, on the growth 
and the character of plants, form some of the sub- 
jects of his investigation. 

Professor Fleischmann, director of the institute, 
until recently of the University of Kouigsberg, Prussia, 
one of the most prominent authorities on Dairy In- 
dustry, (Milchwirthschaft) called my attention to his 
new outfit of aparatus. etc., for bacteriological exami- 
nation of milk etc., and pointed out the merits of his 
fine collection of skulls of different breeds of domestic 
animals. By looking over his collection, my special 
attention was attracted by a sample of milk-sugar, 
forming a cone and weighing eighty pounds, and also 
a very respectable quanity of citric acid obtained from 
milk. 

Much interest and pleasure was added to my so- 
journ in Gottingen by my good friend Dr. Griepenkerl, 
ex-Dean of the Philosophical faculty and decorated 
senior member of that august body, who, at the rec- 
ommendation of his teacher Justus von Liebig, stood 
at the cradle of the Agricultural department of the 
University of Gottingen. His matured views regard- 
ing the present condition of agricultural education, in 
Germany, deservedly claimed my closest attention. 



It was with much regret that I felt obliged to leave 
very pleasant associations to continue my travels, 
according to previous plans. I left Gottingen on the 
11 th of November for Fritzlar, the home of my boy- 
hood and early manhood. After a few days of visit- 
ing grounds dear to me for many reasons, 1 started, by 
way of Cassel and Eisenach for the well-known uni- 
versities of Halle and Leipsiz and eventually Berlin. 
The route leading through the valley of the Eder and 
Fulda to the Thuringian forests presents a most pleas- 
ing aspect during the beginning of November to the 
observing agriculturist. The extensive introduction of 
the beet sugar industry, in this section of Germany, 
has caused the practice of a regulated system of rota- 
tion of corps. Large continuous tracts of land show 
consequently a similar careful preparation rendering 
the extent of the fields planted with sugar-beets, more 
conspicuous. Nothing but huge tracts of grain crops 
break, here and there, extensive areas of well-tilled 
lands. 

To the travelling sight-seers much of interest is of- 
fered in Eisenarch, with its historic castle Wartburg. 
and the cities of Weimar and Gotha known to the 
student of German literature as the temporary home 
of Goethe and Schiller. Traveling liesurely through 
the interesting part of Duchies of Saxony, I stopped 
for one week in Halle to visit its institutions, and also 
those of Leipsiz, both of exceptional interest to me, 
not only on account of their present conspicuous posi- 
tions as centres of agricultural education, but for per- 
sonal associations of an earlier period in my life. With 
best wishes for the New Year, 

Yours very truly, 

C. A. GOESSMANN. 



On Saturday evening, Jan. 27, there was an inter- 
esting inter-class meet at the Drill Hall. The attend- 
ance was fairly good, but more fellows could easily 
have turned out, had they had the spirit. On the whole, 
the contests were close and quite exciting, more inter- 
est being shown in the running events as a rule. 
The first event was the twenty-five yard dash ; there 
being a good many entries it was run off in six heats 
and was exciting up to the final heat, which Chicker- 



102 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ing won by a very slight margin. The thousand yard 
run showed up the talent of the competitors, it being 
also a very good exhibition of condition. It was won 
easily by Macomber in fair time, 

Thefield events, especially the jumps, were not inter- 
esting as the first place in the jumps was a sure thing 
for Claflin, however the competition for second and 
third places, was very strong. Cooke '01 showed a 
jumping ability that was surprising. The shot-put 
was a farce, as there were but three entries, and no 
competition for any place in the event. 

The team races were the most interesting events 
of the meet. The first race was between 1900 and 
1 90 1 . At the start the pace was hot and the seniors 
would undoubtedly have put in a strong fight, had Hull 
not tripped in his first lap and lost nearly half a lap 
for the-team. The second and third runners for the 
juniors increased the lead so that Macomber, the last 
runner, had a lap and one-half for a lead. At this 
point Brown started his race and gave a magnificent 
exhibition. At the stretch he passed Macomber in 
the first lap and at the finish Macomber sprinted in, 
and finished ahead of his man. On the whole the 
seniors ran a very game race against luck, and should 
be congratulated. 

The race between the freshmen and sophomores 
bade fair to be interesting, and indeed the race was 
very close until an accident to the sophomores put 
them out of the race. Morse '01 and Proulx '03 
were the first runners and Proulx succeeded in giving 
the next man, Higgins, a good lead. Chase, the 
sophomore runner, however stuck close to his man 
and sprinted in ahead of him at the end of his four 
laps, getting Dellea off a bit in the lead. The next 
four laps between Dellea and Phelps were very close 
Dellea" holding his lead, but not able to shake off 
his man. The last runners, Cole and Tower, started 
with a rush but Cole had the misfortune to stumble 
and fall thus giving Tower the lead. Tower continued 
to increase his lead and finished a quarter lap in the 
lead, thus giving the freshmen the race. 

OFFICIALS. 

Referee, Prof. Lull. 

Judges at the finish. Prof. Lull, G.F, Parmenter,1900. 

Timer, P. C. Brooks, 1901. 

Starter, H. L. Bodfish, 1902. 



Measurers, J. C. Halligan, 1900, E. H. Atkins, 1900. 
Announcer, J. H. Hall, 1902. 
Clerk of course, H. A. Paul, 1902. 

TRACK EVENTS. 

25-yard dash— 1st, Chickering, 1901 ; 2nd, Brown, 

1900 ; 3d, Claflin, 1902. Time, 3 3-5 sec. 
1000-yards run — 1st, Macomber, 1901 ; 2nd, Wilson, 

1901; 3d, MacCobb, 1902. Time. 2 min., 58 
2-5 sec. 
600-yard run — 1st, Chickering, 1901; 2nd, Dawson, 

1901 ; 3d, Tower, 1903. Time. 1 min., 41 7-5 
sec. 

Team race— 1900 vs. 1901, won by 1901. Time, 3 
min., 48 3-5 sec. 1902 vs. 1903 won by 1903 
quarter lap. Time, 3 min. 56 1-5 sec. 

FIELD EVENTS, 

Shot put— 1st, Cooke, 1901; 2nd, Pierson, 1901; 

3d, O'Hearn, 1903. Distance, 32.3 ft. 
Running High Jump — 1st, Claflin, 1902 ; 2nd, Chase, 

1902; 3d, Cooke, 1901 , and Barrus, 1903, tied. 

Height, 5 ft. 2 in. 
Standing High Jump — 1st, Claflin, 1902 ; 2nd, Tower, 

1903 ; 3d, Cooke, 1901. Height, 4.3 ft. 
Standing Broad Jump — 1st, Claflin, 1902 ; 2nd, 

Cooke, 1901 ; 3d, Barrus, 1903. Distance, 

9.11 ft. 
Score by points— 1901, 33 1-2 ; 1902,20; 1903, 
6 1-2; 1900, 3. 



Collect No*tS' 



— Extra Drill. 

— Sheldon of Northampton has been chosen Senior 
class photographer. 

— Howard Baker, 1900, is taking a forced vacation 
on account of sickness. 

— A. A. Harmon of Chelmsford. Mass., spent Sun- 
day visiting at the Experiment Station. 

— 0. E. O'Hearn '03 who was detained at his home 
by sickness has returned to college and has joined the 
C. S. C. 

— Prof. F. S. Cooley addressed a Farmer's institute 
at West Newbury on January 31. His subject was, 
" The Creameries of Massachusetts." On Friday last 
he addressed an institute in New Bralntree. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



103 



— Dr. C. S. Walker preached in the Baptist Church 
at Three Rivers on Sunday. 

— The Freshman Class have completed their work 
in Algebra and have taken up Geometry. 

— The Life extends sympathies to E. S. Gamwell 
in consideration of the death of his father, aprominent 
lawyer of Pittsfield Mass. 

— The preliminary orders for the Prom, were issued 
last week. The dance tickets are on sale. Arrange- 
ments for hacks for the evening should be made at 
once with the committee in charge. 

— A social dance was enjoyed by the students of 
the dancing class in the Amherst House parlors on 
Tuesday January 30. There were about 25 couples 
present; dancing was from 8 o'clock to 12. 

— Since the last issue of the Life there has been 
two numbers of the Union Lecture Course ; the con- 
cert by the Mozart Symphony Club of N. Y. in College 
Hall and the lecture by President Harris of Amherst, 
'• New England Towns, Past and Present," in the town 
hall. 

— A handicap meet will be held in the Drill Hall at 
7-30 p. M., Saturday, Feb. 10. The events will be 
as follows : 

25-yards dash, 4 feet limit. 

440-yard run, 25 yard limit. 

880-yard run, 45 yard limit. 

1 mile run, 75 yard limit. 

Shot put, 6 feet limit. 

Running High Jump, 6 inch limit. 

Standing High Jump, 6 inch limit. 
Entries close Feb. 8th. 

— The annual meeting and banquet of the Mass. 
Agricultural College Alumni Association of Mass. was 
held in the Quincy House Boston on the evening of 
January 26th. A business meeting was called in the 
parlors at 6-00 o'clock. President Damon presided. 
The reports of the past year were hoard and officers 
for the ensuing year were elected. At 7-30 o'clock 
the party adjourned to the dining hall where the 
banquet was served. S. C. Damon was toastmaster. 
Music was furnished by the Ladies Military Orchestra. 
Among the speakers of the evening were President 
H. H. Goodell. who spoke of the condition of the col- 
lege and of the showing made by the athletic teams 
during the past season and also of the bill which is now 



before the legislature asking for an appropriation, 
annually for four years of $8000. Other speakers 
were Senator Patch ; Representative Bemet from 
Salem ; Dr. Hill, the president of the State Board of 
Education; Prof. Babson; W. H. Bowker of the Bow- 
ker Fertilizer Fertilizer Co.; Dr. Wheeler of the R. 1. 
State College spoke of the progress of that institution 
and Lemuel L. B. Holmes, '72, District Attorney in 
New Bedford gave some interesting reminiscences of 
his college days. Prof. Fernald and M. B. Landers, 
the representative of the Life were the last speakers. 
There were about sixty alumni present. 

— On Friday evening, Feb. 2, the junior class were 
tendered a complimentary banquet by the class of 
1903. This is the third annual banquet of the class 
of 1901. The dinner was held in the Cooley House, 
Springfield, at 10-30 p. m. and feasting and toasting 
were in order till 2 o'clock when the members re- 
tired. There were 27 members of the class present. 
The toastmaster of the evening was E. L. Macomber, 
who introduced the speakers with bright and amusing 
remarks. On the program were some " Originals " by 
W. B. Rogers ; " An Impersonation of Mr. Dooley" 
by E. S. Gamwell, who surpassed Mr. Dooley himself; 
" Ne^v Road to Hamp," by J. Todd supplemented by 
a few good stories on the past, present and future of 
the wonderful innovation. The class quartette favored 
the gathering with a selection and J. B. Henry gave 
a " Smoke Talk." " Our Tabby " was excellently 
treated by C. L. Rice and an original " The Old 
Shell " was read by A. C. Wilson. " The Adjutant's 
Call " was given by Mr. Casey in glowing oratory and 
explanations. A new song written for the occasion by 
Mr. Rice was then sung by the quartet, assisted in 
the chorus by the class. " The Freshmen " were 
treated by Mr. Whitman with a few stories and Mr. 
Brooks closed the speaking with one of his famous 
stump speeches. He so interested the class that it 
was agreed everyone should tell a story. After many 
amusing stories the class adjourned to their rooms. 
At a business meeting it was voted that resolutions 
of sympathy be drawn up and presented to E. S. Gam- 
well for his recent bereavement. 

Whereas, it has please God to take to himself the father of 
one of the members of the Class of Nineteen Hundred and 
One of the Mass. Agricultural College ; and 

Whereas, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and One realizes 



104 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the great loss to one of its members and sympathizes deeply 
with him ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, that we, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and One 
of Mass. Agricultural College extend to our member, Mr. 
Edward S. Gamwell, our sincere and heartfelt sympathy, and 
we deeply regret the loss he has incurred. And be it further 

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to Mr. 

Gamwell; and that another copy be sent to the Aggie Life for 

publication. 

E. L. Macomber, Vice-pres't. 

W. B. Rogers, Sec. 



THE SOLDIER'S SWEETHEART. 

It was a fine May morning in '61. All nature 
seenmed to rejoice. As the morning sun rose in the 
cloudless sky, its rays turned each dewdrop to a spark- 
ling gem of the brightest hue. Amid this scene I 
was strolling leisurely along, enjoying the cool morn- 
ing air,' when I unexpectedly met my friend and 
schoolrnate, Robert Henly. 

It was at this time that the entire North was filled 
with determination for revenge by the news of North- 
ern reverses and Southern victories. Naturally, there- 
fore, we began to discuss the progress of the war, the 
battles, condition of the armies, etc. We had talked 
for some length of time when I noticed that my friend 
acted in a queer manner. He seemed unusually 
happy; but his happiness was such as comes to one, 
after a fit of madness, when revenge seems certain. 
This was not a common mood for Robert and I could 
not understand it. 

" I suppose you are going to enlist," said he. 

" I am going to do so to-day " I answered, for, 
being no longer able to ignore duty's call, I too was 
going to the front. 

" Defeat stares the Union army in the face and it 
will soon have to retreat to the North. Perhaps even 
to New England. Therefore I should advise you not 
to go. Besides what is the use of risking your life for 
the sake of those miserable niggers down South ? " 

" But," said I, " I thought you told me you were 
going to enlist." 

•' I am," and a cynical smile lit up his face. " But 
I am going to enlist on the winning side, the side that 
is fighting for its rights and liberties." 

This nearly shocked me. Could it be that Robert 
Henly was going to join the Confederate army and 
fight against his friends, his home and his country ? 
It did not seem possible that one born and bred arnpng 



the hills of old New England, and educated in the 
patriotic schools of Massachusetts could now turn 
against the flag he had been taught to love. Never- 
theless this was a fact, for even then as I stood gazing 
on the ground at my feet, he bade me good-bye and 
started for his home to make ready for the next south- 
bound train. 

That day I enlisted and went into camp. Time was 
precious so we were pushed rapidly through the neces- 
sary drills and in a week's time we started for the 
seat of war. 

New England was left behind and with it the quiet 
life we had enjoyed there; for the nearer we 
approached the national capital the more were we 
aware of the awfulness of war. What a strong con- 
trast. Maryland trampled by the martial tread of 
gathering armies and shaken by the roar of the on- 
coming storm ; Massachusetts, quiet, having not the 
presence of great armies and hearing, not the actual 
sound of the awful strife, but only the echo. To a 
quiet country lad like me, the situation was too com- 
plicated. I seemed lost in a strange struggling world. 
But remembering my duty toward my country and 
my home, I determined to play my part in this great 
drama about to be acted. 

***** 

It was the last day of the battle of Gettysburg. For 
three days the ever-increasing armies of the North 
and South struggled for victory. Now at the close of 
this last day, the Confederates formed for a last 
assault, I remember seeing the foremost of the 
advancing column — a small company of determined 
men led by a youthful officer — make a mad rush for 
our guns. Then, partly from exhaustion and partly 
from a wound I had received in the leg, I fell. 

When I came to myself again. It was night and 
twinkling stars filled the firmament. The battle was 
over, but the heaps of dead and the cries and moans 
of the dying were almost too much for a human being 
to bear. I was too weak to get up and walk so with 
my knapsack for a pillow, I tried to rest. But rest in 
such a place was out of the question, for from all 
around came the last wails of those whom deaih was 
about to sieze in its relentless grasp. 

Not more than an arm's length from me lay one 
poor fellow struggling between life and death. Sud- 
denly I heard him speak : 



AGGIE LIFE. 



105 



" Mother — Nellie — How can I die an enemy to 
my country, my home and — she whom I love." 

That voice. Was I dreaming? No! I had heard 
it before. I arose almost involuntarily to a sitting posi- 
tion and dragged myself toward the dying man. I 
shuddered. In those staring, upturned eyes and pale 
face, who should I see but Robert Henly. Ah ! those 
words " Nellie," " An enemy to my country." My 
thoughts immediately took their flight to that little 
country town far away, to that beautiful May morning, 
when I met Robert, to his peculiar manner that morn- 
ing and all came to me in an instant. 

As I bent over the almost lifeless man he recog- 
nized me and raised his arms as if to embrace me. I 
placed my canteen to his lips and he seemed much 
revived by its contents. 

" I am so glad to see you once more Bill," he 
said. " I shall never see my home and friends any 
more. My time has come. I know I have done 
wrong. I have deserted my home, my country and," 
his trembling voice seemed to fail, " and you know 1 
loved her. I was rash. It was an unthinking 
moment. I thought she was false to me and I would 
drown my sorrow and take revenge by joining the 
confederate cause. O, foolish youth that I was ! My 
strength fails me, Bill. Raise my head a little from 
this bloody ground." Then he proceeded in weak 
tones almost whispering. " I will ask you one favor. 
When you return home, give these to her," and he 
handed me a letter and a photograph, " and tell her 
that I still loved her and my last words were of her." 
I promised that I would do as he told me. 

" God bless you, — I die — hard. Bill, but God knows 
best. Be true and — " 

The sentence was unfinished for the upturned eyes 
closed and another stiffened form would fill a soldier's 
grave next day. 

Throughout the north the news of the Battle of 
Gettysburg wsa read and the list of dead carefully 
named. 

A GALLANT ASSAULT 

led by 

Capt. Robert Henly. 

A Small Body of Confederates Charge to 

the Very Muzzles of the 

Federal Guns. 

All Perish Before the Deadly Volleys of the 

Boys in Blue. 



Thus read the heading of the column of war news. 
Men read the account saying " yes, it was a daring 
deed," but thought no further of it. There was one, 
however, in a little New England village far away, to 
whom it meant all that was worth living for, and when 
I returned home, for God had spared my life, I saw, 
in the village churchyard, a new grave, above which 
was a marble slab with these words : " A Soldier's 
Sweetheart, she died of a broken heart." 



EL PALACIO MUNICIPAL DE MANTANZAS. 

Sunday, January the first, eighteen hundred and 
ninety-nine, at about two o'clock in the afternoon, the 
United States transport "Manitoba" having on board 
the "Twelfth New York Regiment, United States 
Volunteers" and "Headquarters of the Second Brigade. 
Second Division, First Army Corps" dropped anchor 
in the harbor of Mantanzas. We were the forerun- 
ners of the army of occupation that was being rushed 
into Cuba to take the place of the expatriated Span- 
iards. January first was the day agreeed upon to turn 
the island over to the United States and General J. P. 
Sanger, commanding our force, had hoped to arrive 
in time to receive the keys of the city (so to speak) 
from the Spanish governor, but we were a little late, 
as at exactly twelve o'clock, noon. Colonel Whipple of 
the Engineers, surrounded by about three hundred of 
his men, pulled down the Spanish flag, hoisted the 
stars and stripes in the face of fifteen thousand Span- 
ish soldiers, and took possession of the city in the 
name of Mark Hanna and the United States. 

You can guess with what eager eyes we scanned 
the shores. It was hard to imagine that the month 
was January when we beheld the green fields and 
everything in full bloom, so different from things away 
up in the old Bay State. It looked good, too, to see 
the old flag stretched out as straight as a board from 
a tall staff planted in the middle of a Spanish fortress. 
Close by the fort were the tents of the engineers and 
signal corps. Jast below the fort, on the beach, we 
could see the fellows walking about and many of them 
in bathing. 

As it was too late to disembark that night we spent 
the time in packing up and getting ready for the mor- 
row. Early the next morning the regiment was landed, 
making camp near the engineers. The headquarters 
detachment, which it was my forune, or misfortune, to 



io6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



be with, stayed on board. Plenty of work was found 
for me to do in the Adjutant General's office on the 
hurricane deck and there we were all busily engaged 
during the day. But on Wednesday morning bright 
and early the General, Staff, Clerks, and Orderlies, 
with office paraphernalia and personal baggage, were 
loaded on a little tug and landed at the pier not far 
from the center of the town. The general established 
his headquarters in the palace, and right there in the 
chief building of Mantanzas, in an apartment where 
once the aristocratic Don held forth, did I spend my 
days enjoying the balmy air and wielding the pen once 
in a while to earn my salt. 

In the center of the beautiful Cuban city of Mantan- 
zas and fronting the Plaza de Armas is situated the 
" Palacip Municipal " easily the most interesting and 
conspicuous public building of the place. From the 
outside one sees a long, two-storied, adobe like struc- 
ture, built of a sort of sandstone peculiar to this sec- 
tion, with its second story projecting and supported 
from the ground by arched columns, leaving beneath 
it a wide, marble-tiled promenade, gladly sought as a 
shelter from the fierce heat of the noon-day sun by 
numberless mendicants ; one of the many curses of 
this ill-fated country. In its lower story, beginning at 
the right, at the corner of " Calle Ayuntamiento " is 
found a money exchange where the American dollar 
represented at the time of my visit un peso y trespesetas 
in silver or about one dollar and thirty cents in Amer- 
ican money. Next this is a restaurant with a bar and 
ice-cream saloon attached. The restaurant proper is 
in an inner courtyard peculiar to Cuban buildings, 
where amid growing palms, bananas, and orange trees, 
nourished by the spray of many fountains, one could 
dine amid truly royal surroundings. In the opposite 
corner of the building on "Calle Conturas" is a finely 
appointed apothecary shop that s,hows very quickly 
the nationality of the invaders for on a row of bottles 
on the top shelf one reads "Lydia E. Pinkham's 
Vegetable Compound." 

Entering the main entrance in the middle of the 
building you pass up a series of marble steps and 
come into an immense hallway with coridors leading 
to the right and left. On this second floor you find 
the offices of the city and provincial officails, and 
in the left wing the personal apartments of the gover- 
nor general of the province. Directly in front of the 



stairway in the central position looking out on the 
plaza is the office and council chamber of the 'alcalde' 
municipal. 'Twas here that General Sanger estab- 
lished his headquarters, and here that I spent my 
first night in a palace sleeping on a marble-topped 
table to escape the innumerable but unmentionable 
flea that found its shiny mahogany legs unsurmount- 
able obstacles in his carnivorous reconnaissance. 



BATTALION OFFICERS. 

The following appointments of cadet officers and 
non-commissioned officers have been announced, viz : 
Cadet Frank H. Brown to be Cadet Major. 
Cadet Morris B. Landers to be Cadet Adjutant. 
Cadet William B. Rogers to be Cadet Quartermaster. 
Cadet C. L. Rice to be Cadet Sergeant Major. 
Cadet J. C. Barry to be Cadet Quartermaster-sergeant. 

COMPANY A. 

Cadet W. C. Dickerman to be Cadet Captain. 
Cadet N. D. Whitman to be Cadet First Lieutenant. 
Cadet E. S. Gamwell to be Cadet Second Lieutenant. 
Cadet S. Graves, Jr., to be Cadet First Sergeant. 
Cadet J. H. Chickering to be Cadet Second Sergeant. 
Cadet H. A. Paul to be Cadet Third Sergeant. 
Cadet W. A. Dawson to be Cadet Fourth Sergeant. 
Cadet P. C. Brooks to be Cadet Fifth Sergeant. 
Cadet G. C. Clarke to be Cadet Corporal. 
Cadet R. W. Morse to be Cadet Corporal. 
Cadet W. G. Chase to be Cadet Corporal. 
Cadet G. R. Bridgeforth to be Cadet Corporal. 

COMPANY B, 

Cadet A. C. Wilson to be Cadet Captain. 
Cadet C. E. Gordon to be Cadet First Lieutenant. 
Cadet E.L. Macomber to be Cadet Second Lieutenant. 
Cadet S. Casey to be Cadet First Sergeant. 
Cadet C. F. Leslie to be Cadet Second Sergeant. 
Cadet R. I. Smith to be Cadet Third Sergeant. 
Cadet J. B. Henry to be Cadet Fourth Sergeant. 
Cadet J. H. Todd to be Cadet Fifth Sergeant. 
Cadet A. L. Dacy to be Cadet Corporal. 
Cadet E. F. McCobb to be Cadet Corporal. 
Cadet C. Dwyer to be Cadet Corporal. 
Cadet J. C. Hall to be Cadet Corporal. 



A pleasing essay is that on Poe in the Delaware 
College Review. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



107 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The Liquefaction of Gases by Willett L. Hardin, 
Ph. D. This book is of especial interest considering 
the recent developments in the liquefaction of air and 
the extended practical importance which is anticipated 
of it. This line of scientific research abounds in 
ingenious experiments the most noted and successful 
of which are treated of in this work. The book is 
primarily a history of the investigations and a descrip- 
tion of the methods employed in producing liquids 
from gases. It consists of four chapters starting with 
the first investigation and extending to the present 
time. The first chapter is a brief account of the 
early observations on the compression of gases which 
have no connection with later developments and are 
only of historic interest. The second chapter 
describes the first systematic researches of Faraday, 
Berthelot and contemporary scientists. Many good 
results were obtained by these men and the funda- 
mental methods of obtaining high pressures and low 
temperatures were first employed by them. The 
third chapter is theoretical in its nature and consists of 
a discussion of the critical constants, the kenetic 
theory of gases and the continuity of gases and 
liquids. The last chapter is the most important one 
and occupies the greater part of the volume. The 
period of which this chapter treats extends over the 
last two decades. In December, 18g7 Cailletet and 
Pictet who were working along similar lines of research, 
each with his own methods succeeded in liquefying 
oxygen. This was the beginning of a new line 
of investigation. These experiments and later ones of 
consequence are treated of quite comprehensively. 
In conclusion is a discussion of the three states of 
matter, physiological action at low temperatures and 
the industrial application of liquefied gases. 

Text-book of Embryology of the Invertebrates by Dr. 
E. Korschelt and Dr. K. Heider. Translated from 
the German by Matilda Bernard. This is the third 
of the four volumes which were to be translated. The 
fourth volume will soon be published completing a 
set of books which will be an indispensable addition to 
the handbooks required in every zoological laboratory. 
This work is generally considered the standard Ger- 
man text-book on the subject, Students of entomol- 
ogy will be interested to know that over a third of the 
book is devoted to the Insecta. The metaimorphosis 



as well as the embryonic development of insects is 
fully discussed. The illustrations in this as well as in 
other parts of the book are an important feature mak- 
ing it especially adapted for the laboratory. The other ' 
groups with which this volume deals are the Arach- 
nida. Onychophora and Myriopoda. 

The Races of Man by J. Deniker, Contemporay 
Science Series. The object of this book has been to 
give in a condensed from the essential facts of the 
two sciences, anthropology and ethnography. The 
book is written in a popular form and such technical 
terms as are used are explained. The book begins 
with a comparison of man and the apes, and of the 
different races of man. The latter comparison is 
based upon their stature, tegument and pigmentation. 
Other morphological and physiological characteristics 
are next treated, followed by chapters on ethnic, 
linguistic and socialogical characteristics. The 
author works out according to his own ideas, the 
difficult problem of the classification of races and 
peoples, His scheme of classification is to form 
natural groups by combining the different character- 
istics as color of the skin, nature of hair, stature, and 
form of head and nose. With this in mind he sep- 
arates mankind into thirteen races and by continuing 
the analysis further into thirty sub-divisions or types. 



The poem entitled 'The Royal Mail" which first 
appeared in the Yale Courant and which has been 
copied by other papers is a fine picture of a lively and 
exciting scene. The words are well chosen for des- 
criptive effect. The rush, and the whirl, and the 
noise, as the stage goes by are there. 
THE ROYAL MAIL. 

Quick! ho, ye honest gentle-folk! 

Fling up your windows wide ! 
Let fall your knives, ye busy wives ! 

Lads, fo the highway side ! 
Come, tapsier of the Bull and Boar, 

Put by that mug of ale ! 
Let high and low enjoy the show — 

Here comes the Royal Mail ! 

With clang of hoof and ring of horn, 

And blaze of kingly blue, 
In mighty swerve she rounds the curve 

And bursts upon the view. 



io8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The postboys' whips are whistling high, 
Their mounts are panting free, 

From red to roan all dashed with foam, 
And racing gloriously. 

A merry company on top, 

A glimpse of more within, 
A brave array of kerchiefs gay 

That flutter 'mid the din ; 
A hearty cheer that echoes long, 

A dust cloud rtsing fast — 
And now it's o'er to v/ork once more — 
The Royal Mail is past. 

— Yale Courant. 
By the variety and character of the reading matter 
in The Walking Leaf we should judge that the editors 
have a warm interest in their paper. 

" Comme II Faut," in the Vermont University Cynic 
is an entertaining story. 



uirmi 



'90. — C. H. Jones, State Chemist, Vermont, 
'92. — R. H. Smith, who has been studying Chem- 
istry in Germany for the past two years, has returned 
to this country. 

'92. — E. B. Holland addressed the Chemical Club 
at the Experiment Station last Monday evening on 
" Butters, oleos and process butters." 

We are pleased to quote the following from the 
Springfield Republican of Feb. 1 , concerning one of 
our alumni : 

VICTOR H. BRIDGMAN HAS CHARMED LIFE. 

The many friends of Victor H. Bridgman, who was 
at the Agricultural College in Amherst for four years, 
and later, after studying law in J. C. Hammond's 
office was admitted to the Hampshire county bar, 
will be interested in the following account of the part 
he took in an engagement of the campaign in Panay, 
Philippines. The account is taken from the Ameri- 
can of Dec. 14, published in Manila. It says: — 

" The insurgents had the range of that bend down 
to a nicety, and upon the first appearance of the 
American advance poured in withering volleys. The 
infantry was unable to advanced unaided. • Bull ' 
Bridgman, he of the famous Bridgman's bull battery, 
mounted on a big black mule, surveyed the ground, 
ascertained the range of the trenches and ordered up 
a platoon. This came up the road on a full charge, 
infantry reserves cheering, drivers lashing mules and 
canoneers hanging on for dear life. The artilery work 
was wonderful, swept as the place was by bullets. 



The highest commendation Bridgman's battery ever 
can receive was spontaneously given by the whole 
18th rising and cheering as the battery came on the 
plaza at Paria after the first day's fight. Experts are 
still trying to figure out how the ' old man,' on his big 
black mule, got through. Always in the front with 
the skirmish line, Bridgman was an object for a 
sharpshooter that could hardly be missed. But he 
never swerved or ducked. He led and the battery 
would have followed him to — well, anywhere." 

'95. — Daniel Hemenway, superintendent of the 
college plant houses is also taking dairy course. 

'99. W. H. Armstrong is a student at Harvard 
college in the regular four year course. 



The Rub Down 

is as good as the exercise. Its good la 
doubled if you rub the tired muBcIes with 



(Johnsons 

Apodt/iKUNIMENT 



Endorsed by leading instructors and 
athletes in every line of sport. Ninety 
years record for the cure of sprains, bruises, 
and all inflammation. Sold by druggists. 
Two Size bottles— 25 cents or 60 cents. 




I. S. JOHNSON & CO, Boston, Mass. 



EB 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



50 YEARS' . 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac- 
Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communlca. 
tions strictly confldentlal. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken throuRh Munn & Co. recelT« 
tpecial notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific JImerican. 

A handsomely lllnstrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific lournal. Terms, $3 » 
year ; four months, fL Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN iCo.3«i«"«''«»». Hew York 

Branch Office. 636 F St., WuhUwton, D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits ^x^prtssed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in tlie latest stj'le. 

Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Wc Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders (or our line of books, or hand- 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



TBAOHERS WANTED! 

UNION TEBCHEBS' flSEpiES OF PEQICR. 



Re^. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pit jSburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York,-WasIiington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHIfiGTON, D. C, OP PITTSBUHG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amhkrst, Mass 



OFFICE Hours : » a. m. to 5 r. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook'8 Block, Amherst, Mait. 



ACiCiili; kjitt.. 



start ii) Basifiess fov Yoarself. 



SUCCESS ASSUMED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. TJ^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
OE0LEB IN BTOfES BHO RHHSES. 

AGENT FOK THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Watei'- Heaters. 

Teleplione 564. 



. R. EL 



(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and alwaj's fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

^° All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^^ 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehasetts flgriealtopal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percheroii Horses id Soyioi Sleep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE JLIF^E, 



COLLEGE CO-OFERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

ORFOSITE TOWN HAUL. 

w. w. BOirsiTosr, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Blrcli Beer and Glng«r 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



NORTHAMFXON, MASS. 



£. B. HICKINBDN, H. ID. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

9 TO IS -A.. H/C., 1-30 TO iS F. Is/I. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVEBTBODT. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBEIIS O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Jt^Itepairing done u>hil« you viaitt^SS 
9 PH(EN1X ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE 



T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BA.RGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT aTRJEET, AMSEMST, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

flats, Gaps, Gloves. Genls' Furnisigs, 

FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Ou-storxi JVIa.cie Olotlxing;. 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

Co-Operative Steam Laundry* 

aiid Carpet Renovating Estaiilisliment. 



A.SS^^> A.s:G>tn.±^ 



H. Xv. CI«A.1VEJ 'OO 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SS^s:S-A.TISFA.aTI01Sr <3-XJA.R,A.I^TBEr>. (>>&^ 
OFFICE : 

Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 
ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



[ifinoe's jltiilGtii; iiitfllll 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STOrtE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Go. 



84 ana 86 Franklin Street, 



BOSTOy, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. P. Kklton. 



D. B. KELTON. 



R. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POOLTRY, VE6ETBBLES, FISH m OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDiO. 

Soelaty, Class and Group Work a. Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to studtnts. 



KS Main tiKEET, Nokthampton, Mass. 

T«l«phen« connection. 




'P 



Consider— If yon can keep tlie wet out 
of youi rifle It will not rustnoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, shedding -water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-paae book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date Infor- 
1; . matlon about powders,black and smoke- 
Si less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
K/ load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
v. jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.: 
SL trajectories, Teloclties,penetrations. All 
'gx' calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
ffif , 1,000 other things, including many trade 
«•? i secrets never before given to the public. 
^M\free if vou will send Stamps for postage to 
m* The Marlin Firearm* Co., New Haven, Ct. 



The M. N. Spear Book Store. 



ESTABLISHED FIFTY YEARS. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fhie line of Statio7tery, Fancy Goods^ &c. 

A SPEGIALTY-M. A. G. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

2= 13: o T o a- 13 -<fi>- :e= EC E i^ . 



Portrait and Group WorJc a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, §'2.00 and §2.50 per doz. 
Cards, §1.50 and §1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
atudio, 17 Spving Street, - - AUtBEItST, MASS. 



Hmberet Ibouee. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manaqmr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash mid at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. 



DBALER IN 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELHY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



we: MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The Northampton M Store. 

L. E. CHEW, Manager. 

Cor. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 



MASS. AGR1GULTUI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 
generally, that we are prepared to supply- 
in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shruhs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 
PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



4TA I LP R. ^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 



AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



/Hbassacbueette 

Haticultural 

College 

. OFFERS • 

1. A SHORT WINTER COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
"Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the slate. Op(u to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 

Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 




\ 



Feb. 21, 1900 






m 



^^^"^^ 




X. 



NO. 10. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISHINOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



CAKKNta ^. AOWHOUS(, 



AMHa$f , Aa$$, 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles jnst received. 

A neAV and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

HoflFman House and Le Koi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AWIHERST HOUSE DHUG STORE. 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.jo, $j, $J.SO. 
Patent Leathers, $2._§o to $5.00. 



R EIPAI R I rsl 0.=^=^ 

New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 



Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



60LLE&E m 
JEWELER Dl 



COLLEGE 
JEWELffi 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

4®=-ETES FITTED FKEE.=®8r 
By a graduate of Dk. Foster, Occnlist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Eats, Caps, Gloves, 

DKESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




<:w„^N 



COXjL.A.E,S 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 




VOL. X. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 21, 1900 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Siudents of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, 'GO, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

^ Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o{ United States and Canada, 26c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
Collefre Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. .athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Edi'tb rials. 



The winter is fast departing and it is an opportune 
time to lool? at our prospects in athletics for next 
spring. We have this winter enjoyed an exceptional 
advantage in the use of the indoor track and the 
results are bound to show when we get outdoors once 
naore. The money expended in fitting up the gymna- 
sium has been a good investment in more ways than 
one. Not only has it kept our men in training but it 
has kept alive the interest in athletics, a thing abso- 
lutely necessary to success. The two indoor meets 
that have been held brought to light hidden talent 
that may with the right training be developed success- 
fully. In the three meets which are still to be held 
indoors let us continue our training and strive to keep 
on hand a reserve stock of enthusiasm. In our 
zealousness over our indoor track athletics, however, 
we should not lose sight of the baseball interests of 
the spring. If we are to put out a team with any hope 
of success in the early part of the season it is time 
the indoor training began. It will be a very simple 



matter to arrange baseball practice so that it will not 
interfere with track work. 



As we are all aware our college receives every year 
from the national governments something over sixteen 
thousand dollars toward its support. The source from 
which this amount comes is the sale of public lands 
and as this income is in danger of being cut off by the 
opening up of these lands free of cost to settlers we 
are naturally very greatly interested in the outcome of 
the bill that is now before our legislature bodies in 
Washington. Considering the Free homestead Bill from 
the standpoints of justice we can see no grounds on 
which it can be carried through. We have had 
examples before of the effect of opening up public 
lands. Men are allured by brillant prospects that are 
set forth by transportation companies or over zealous 
newspapers and soon after obtaining possession of their 
acres they find themselves in want. The farmer who 
has insufficient capital to purchase a farm in the West 
at the present price per acre would soon find himself 
embarrassed even if he were given his land. A large 



iib 



AGGIE LIFE. 



proportion of those who rush forward so eagerly to find 
for themselves and family a home away from the 
crowded East are merely speculators who have no 
idea of permanently occupying the farm which they 
have been presented with by our beneficient govern- 
ment and thus we will have the Oklohama scene 
enacted over again. For the government to give 
away this land would be a great waste of money which 
is being pnt to the best possible use at present. We 
can with very little calculation determine the effect 
which a loss of this money would produce upon our 
college. It would necessitate radical changes in the 
method of management of the college which would 
greately injure its efficiency. When we consider that 
every state college in the country would be similarily 
despoiled we can appreciate the great loss which would 
be sustained by the cause of education. The United 
States government is to-day expending large sums for 
the benefit of agriculture but none of the m.oney appro- 
priated accomplishes as much for the farmer as this 
amount which enables him to give his son or daughter 
an education. 



THE LEATHER BREECHES. 

Far back in the early history of Massachusetts on 
a dark night in the late fall, there anchored in Massa- 
chusetts Bay a strange craft, displaying no flag, and 
trying in every possible way to conceal its arrival. A 
boat was let down from it and two men, each carry- 
ing what seemed to be very heavy bags, descending 
into it, rowed quickly and silently into an out-of-the- 
way place on the shore and landed, always keeping 
the same carefulness of movement. They slowly and 
laboriously crept, rather than walked, tov/ard Boston, 
which was nothing but a small town at that time. As 
soon as they had reached the common, they both de- 
posited their bags on the ground and began to look for 
a suitable place to hide them. The bags, as now 
could be seen, were made of leather and were noth- 
ing more nor less than their own breeches which these 
men — pirates — had used, in absence of other recep- 
tacles, to fill with gold coins preparatory to depositing 
them in a safe place on landing. They, probably, 
chose Boston common, as being the more easily re- 
membered, in case they wished to come back after 
the money. 

But all of a sudden they were surprised, by some 



worthy Puritan, perhaps, who happened, as luck would 
have it, to be passing through the common close by 
them. They hurriedly threw the breeches over their 
backs and beat a hasty retreat for some safer place, 
walking half the night along the old stage road out of 
Boston until they came to Groton — an assemblage of 
block-houses and log cabins ; but this time, in- 
stead of attempting to bury the treasure right in the 
town, they chose rather to go to a large hill just out- 
side of the town situated in a place, called the 
"Ridges" on account of a number of small hills 
which rise one after another like the rolling prairies of 
the West. Here, however, they were not free from 
peering eyes, for behind two trees as they came up 
were two dark, fierce-looking faces taking in every- 
thing with their sharp black eyes. 

" What are they doing," said Pemigasset to his 
brother Wam, are they white men or are they mes- 
sengers from the Great Spirit ? " 

Wam who had never seen pirates before, much 
less pirates in bright red drawers, great hip boots, and 
blue coats, thought at once that they could not be 
white men but some supernatural beings ; and as soon 
as the two pirates had left their booty safely buried, 
he stole up, uncovered the breeches, and rummaged 
after the money, which he was not long in finding be- 
cause the trousers were full almost to the waistband, 
being tied at the bottoms. 

" Ah," said Wam, " The Great Spirit has surely 
left this here for us. Look at all these bright pieces I 
But we must not take many. He might be angry 
with us. Let us each take one and leave the rest 
that we may please him ; for I am sure they have 
some charm. 

Meanwhile our two pirates, who were hurrying back 
to their ship with all speed, arrived just in time to get 
on and sail away. And it was fortunate they did ar- 
rive before daylight, for if the sturdy Bostonians had 
seen them with their pirate ship anchored in the har- 
bor, it might, possibly, have gone hard with them. 
They sailed away and before many days encountered 
a ship which over did them. Most of the pirate crew 
were killed,and among them the two men I have men- 
tioned, and the rest taken prisoners, to be hung later 
on. So ended the pirates, but the money was des- 
tined to make more trouble. 

When Wam and Pemiasset returned to their tribe 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Ill 



they showed the charms the Great Spirit had left them 
and on account of these the tribe immediately made 
the two brothers their medicine men. They per- 
formed many wonderful tricks, often conjuring the 
Great Spirit up from the " happy hunting grounds " to 
help their fellow tribesmen. Their names became 
renowned far and near as those of the Great Medicine 
Men. Their wonderful feats of magic surprised out- 
siders so much that their tribe, also, became famous 
as the one favored by the Great Spirit. Wam, how- 
ever, being the one who found the charm first, was by 
far the greater of the two. He healed by simply 
touching the affected part and caused deer to be slain 
by merely pointing the arrow at them — no aim being 
required at all. 

When Wam died, so the Indians say, there were 
great manifestations in the sky of the Great Spirit's 
favor to him ; and while his tribe were burying him 
with all the pomp and ceremony due so great a man, 
a canoe appeared on the lake containing a celestial 
being, who, as soon as they had finished the funeral 
rites, came and stood over the newly- made grave, 
waving two feathers in its hands and uttering inaudi- 
ble words. His brother, Pemigasset, when Wam had 
passed away, lost his power, but one night as he was 
wandering near his brother's grave he saw a light ap- 
pear and he followed it over hill and dale, through 
woods and swamps until he came to the place where 
the leather breeches were hidden The light now 
stopped and suddenly changed into Wam, who, not 
uttering a word, pointed at the place saying the one 
word " dig." Pemigasset took the hint and dug with 
his hands until he was tired, without finding anything, 
whatever, except a few bright brass buttons, which he 
carefully picked up. But Wam was not satisfied. 
" Dig" he said again and Pemigasset dug on until at 
last he found a beautiful shining silver bow with ten 
silver arrows all tipped with gold. 

"Go," said Wam, "and the first white man you 
see, shoot him with one of those arrows. If you hit 
him the inheritance of the land will be the Indian's 
forever, but if you do not strike him, the great tribes 
Indians will pass from the earth to be replaced by 
thousands of white men. The bow and the arrows 
will immediately fly from your hands, return to the 
place whence you have dug them, and I will always 
haunt this region with my light, leading white men 



and Indians, until the treasure, which will take on its 
original form, is found." 

Pemigasset, delighted with his new bow and his 
beautiful gold-tipped arrows, immediately went forth 
to shoot ; but no sooner had he gotten well into the 
woods than he saw a white man within easy shot. He 
took hasty aim, shot and missed, hitting a tree di- 
rectly in front of him. He instantly fell dead to the 
ground, pierced by one of his own silver arrows. 

And now if, as you are passing the ridges on a dark 
night, you hear a mournful voice wailing in sad tones. 
and if before you appears a light, you must follow it 
and you will come to a dark, stony place surrounded 
by great pines and spruces and around it, many In- 
dians, ;^tribesmen of Wam, who, every night come 
here to bewail their loss. If you are brave enough to 
pass into the center and dig, you will find the treasure 
which the pirates hid there two hundred years ago. 

V. GURNEY. 

Note. — This legend is founded on fact, being taken 
essentially from one told by a man who has lived in 
the region mentioned all of his life, as have his 
ancestors. 



TRIP TO THE BAD LANDS. 

On Friday evening, Feb. 16, Professor Lull deliv- 
ered a very interesting lecture to the College on his 
trip to the Bad Lands of Wyoming. 

In the summer of '99 the American Museum of 
Natural History at New York sent out an expedition 
to the Bad Lands in search of remains of the Dino- 
saur, an animal which lived probably over a million 
years ago. The rich Jurassic formation of the Bad 
Lands abound in these fossil remains. The expedi- 
tion of which Professor Lull was a member was in 
charge of Prof. H. F. Osburne of the department of 
Biology at Columbia University and curator of the 
American Museum of Natural History. 

Leaving Amherst about the middle of May, Profes- 
sor Lull went to Jersey City where he received in- 
structions from Professor Osburne and made other 
preparations for his trip. From Jersy City he went 
directly to Laramie, Wyoming, Here he bought his 
company outfit and on May 19 started for Bone Cabin 
Camp where the quarry was located. 

Although in May, the weather was very cold and 
snow had to be shovelled out of the quarry before the 



tI2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



work could begin. Having once started the work of 
excavation it was continued without interruption save 
for occasional prospecting trips through the country. 
The days were spent in constant digging in the mire, 
the evenings in rambling through the country about 
the camp. Sunday was a day of rest. The hours 
were spent in doing the weekly washing and travelling 
to Medicine Bow, the nearest town for supplies. At 
Bone Cabin Camp many remains were found and 
packed and shipped East, and it was here that most 
of the work was done. 

On one of the prospecting trips Professor Osburne 
discovered at a point nine miles from Bone Cabin the 
tail vertebra of a gigantic Brontosaur. It was de- 
cided to search deeper in the rock at this place and 
Professor Lull and two other men were sent to open 
and wQrk a quarry. Here they established a camp 
called*" Nine Mile Camp " from its location, and at 
this camp the professor spent the month of July. The 
climate proved to be more enjoyable than it had been 
at Bone Cabin Camp. The scenery too was far 
superior on account of the closeness of the river. 
Mosquitoes were very plentiful. Early in August 
Professor Lull and Professor Mathews left Nine Mile 
Camp for a trip in the lands toward the north. This 
trip proved both enjoyable and interesting although no 
important " finds " were made. In two weeks they 
returned to the Camp and toward the latter part of the 
month the professor returned to Amherst. 

The lecture was illustrated by stereopticon views of 
photographs taken by the professor and other members 
of the party. They consisted of views of the camp, 
quarry and surrounding country and in themselves gave 
one an excellent idea of the character of the Bad 
Lands of Wyoming. While no mountains were to be 
found in the vicinity of Bone Cabin Camp the surface 
of the country was broken by steep bluffs and ridges. 
A low sage bush is the only form of vegetation. 
Water was very scarce. A hot dry wind swept over 
the sand and made the work far more disagreeable. 
Among the vie^s was the town of Medicine Bow 
showing the low flat houses and the town entirely de- 
void of trees ; the Medicine Bow River with its float- 
ing bridge ; the camp and quarry and the Bone Cabin 
from which the camp took its name, and many fine 
views of the fossils themselves. The views of the 
Brontosaur found in Nine Mile Camp were especially 



good showing the gigantic size of its dorsal vertebra 
and the ribs which were ten feet in length. The 
thigh bone found in this animal measured ten feet also 
the restored animal measured at least eighty feet. 
Over a carload of fossils were obtained but the exact 
result of the expedition from a scientific standpoint 
can not yet be determined. 

N. R. M. 



i^-fchletic No*?S- 



On Saturday, Feb. 10, the first handicap meet 
was run off in the Drill Hall. The entries for the 
events were numerous, and a great deal of interest 
was shown both by the contestants and by the specta- 
tors. As usual the running events attracted the most 
interest, there being some very pretty races. 

The twenty-five yard dash was the first event, and 
was run off in three heats. The final heat was very 
exciting. The mile run was a very pretty race ; there 
being but four starters ; Wilson, Chickering, Dawson, 
and Bowler. Wilson set the pace and the race re- 
solved into a struggle between Wilson and Chicker- 
ing for first place and a fight between Dawton and 
Bowler for the honors in third place. Wilson made 
a brave run but mistook the number of laps called, 
letting up too soon and giving Chickering first place. 

In the 440 yard run Brown made a very good show- 
ing and won out on his speed. Dawson also showed 
up well in this race and promises fair for some good 
work in the spring. 

The Field events were very uninteresting as a rule : 
the scratch men winning in all the events with very 
little trouble. In the shot put Stanley was pushed 
quite close but managed to win. 
Officials. 
Referee, Prof. R. S. Lull. 

Judges at Finish, Prof. R. E. Smith, Prof. P. B. 
Hasbrouck. 

Timer, P. C. Brooks, 1901. " 
Starter, Bodfish, 1902. 
Clerk of course, H. A. Paul, 1902. 
Announcer, C. L, Rice, 1901. 
Measurers, Atkins, 1900, E, S. Gamwell, 1901. 
Official Handicapper, A. C. Wilson. 
25-Yard Dash. 
1st, Landers, 1900, 4 ft. handicap. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"3 



2nd. 



( Brown, 1900, scratch. 



( Stanley, 1900, dead heat, 3 ft., handicap. 
Time, 3 2-5. sec. 

440 Yard Run. 
1st, Brown, 1900, 10 yds., handicap. 
2nd, Dawson, 1901 15 yds., handicap. 
3rd, Chickering, 1901, scratch. 
Time, 1 min., 6 sec. 

880- Yard Run. 
1st, Chickering, 1901, 10 yds., handicap. 
2nd, Wilson, 1901, scratch. 
3rd, Bowler, 1903, 45 yds., handicap. 
Time, 2 min.. 29 2-5 sec. 

Mile Run. 
1st, Chickering, 1901, scratch. 
2nd, Wilson, 1901. scratch. 
3rd, Dawson, 1901, 50 yds. 
Time, 5 min., 33 4-5. 

Shot Put. 



1st, 


Stanley, 1900, 


ACTUAL PUT 

34.30 ft. 


HANDICAP 

scratch 


2nd 


Pierson, 1901, 


30.53 ft. 


3.5 ft. 


3rd, 


Halligan, 1900. 


28.70 


5 ft. 




Running High Jump. 








ACTUAL PLAY 


HANDICAP 


1st, 


Barrus, 1903. 


4 ft. 10 in. 


scratch 


2nd 


Tower. 1903, 


4 ft. 7.6 in 


1 inch 


3rd, 


Frost, 1900, 


4 ft. 3.4 in. 


2 inches 




Standing High Jump. 








ACTUAL Jump 


HANDICAP 


1st, 


Tower, 1903, 


4 ft. 


scratch 


2nd 


Dwyer, 1902, 


3 ft. 8.9 in 


3 in 


3rd. 


{, Barrus. 1903. 
"[Stanley. 1900. 


3 ft. 7.7 in. 
3 ft. 7.7 in. 


2 in 
2 in 



OUR COMMANDANTS. 

Last week we published in our alumni notes by 
mistake the adventures of Victor H. Bridgman in 
the Philippines. Captain Bridgman was not one of 
our alumni but was for four years the military instruc- 
tor at the college. We are pleased to hear of the 
gallant action of another of our former military offi- 
cers. This time it is Captain G. E. Sage. Captain 
Sage was in General Lawton's division and with only 
nine men held a large body of the insurgents at bay. 
With his own hand he shot down five and held his 



position until relieved. A short time previous to 
his death General Lawton highly commended him 
for his bravery and recommended that he be given a 
medal for exceptional gallantry. Captain Sage was 
instructor at the college from 1886 to 1889 and will 
be remembered by students of that time as a man of 
strong character and unusual ability. 



Colleif l^otfs- 



— Condition examinations in mathematics were 
held on Saturday last. 

— D. S. Greeley has left college and entered the 
Civil Engineering course at Cornell. 

— Howard Baker, '00, has recovered from his 
recent illness and has returned to college. 

— President H. H. Goodell has been recently con- 
fined to his house for nearly a week with sickness. 

— Prof. G. F. Mills addressed the girls' improve- 
ment society of the Amherst high school. His sub- 
ject was " A visit to Greece." 

— Owing to other bills now before the legislative 
bodies at Washington the Free Homestead Bill will 
not come up for consideration for two weeks. 

— C. M. Winslow of Brandon, Vt., secretary of the 
Ayrshire Breeders Association addressed the classes 
in Agriculture on Friday. Feb. 16. on the Ayrshire 
breed cattle. 

— Sunday, February 1 1 , was observed by the col- 
lege as a day of prayer. Prof. Tyler of Amherst 
College addressed the Y. M. C. A. in the chapel in 
the afternoon. 

— The Meteorological department represents a 
rainfall of 3. 10 inches between the hours of 1 1 a. m. 
on Feb. 12 and 1 p. l. Feb. 13. This is one of the 
heaviest rainfalls on record. 

— At a recent meeting the officers of the Amherst 
town library were chosen for the ensuing year. 
Among the board of managers are Pres't H. H. 
Goodell and Prof. G. F. Mills. 

— Prof. Fernald has been absent from college dur- 
ing the past week attending the hearing given by the 
legislature on the Gypsy Moth bill asking for an appro- 
priation to carry on the work of exterminating the 
Gypsy Moth, 



114 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Prof. R. S. Lull delivered an illustrated lecture 
on his trip to the Bad Lands of Wyoming in the 
chapel on Friday evening, Feb. 16. An account of 
the lecture appears elsewhere in this issue. 

— The seventh number of the Union lecture course 
was given in the town hall one week ago to-night. 
The entertainment consisted of stories, sketches and 
songs of the " Old Times Down South " by Polk 
Miller. 

— The bill relating to an appropriation for the col- 
lege was given a hearing before the Agricultural com- 
mittee of the legislature and was later sent to the 
committee on Ways and Means with a recommenda- 
tion that it be passed. 

— The freshman-sophomore basket ball game will 
be played in the drill hall on Thursday evening, Feb. 
22, at 7-15 p. M. There is a great deal of interest 
centered on this game and an exciting time can be 
promised. The Sophomores have won the rope-pull 
and the football while the Freshmen have proved 
victorious in the campus rush. If the Freshmen win 
in the basket ball game the two classes will stand 
even and the better will be determined by the base- 
ball game in the spring. J. M. Dellea captains the 
1902 team and J. G. Cook the 1903. 

— On Thursday evening, Feb. 22, the college fra- 
ternities will hold their annual banquet in accordance 
with the suggestion or recommendation of the Frater- 
nity Conference committee. The annual banquets 
have been held in the past, on Monday evening of 
Commencement Week and owing to the conflict be- 
tween the alumni banquet and the senior promenade 
it was thought advisable to hold the fraternity banquets 
during the winter and leave Monday night of Com- 
mencement free for the alumni and Tuesday night for 
the dance. The executive committee of the alumni 
association together with the Fraternity Conference 
committee in a joint m.eeting considered the question 
and decided to obtain the opinion of the alumni. Cir- 
culars were sent out and an overwhelming majority of 
the answers favored the change. Accordingly the 
committee recommended the action which the frater- 
nities have taken and the date has been set as Feb. 
22, the evening following the annual military prom. 
It is more or less of an experiment this year and 
whether this will become an established custom in 



the future depends entirely upon the number of alumni 
club members who return to the banquets and reunion 
this year. 

— The annual military prom, takes place in the 
drill hall this evening and promises to be even a 
greater social success than ever before. The hall is 
very neatly and artistically decorated and presents a 
fine appearance. The committee on decorations 
have spared neither time nor labor and much credit 
is due to them for the effects of their exertion. The 
chairman of the committee is N. D. Whitman. The 
Philharmonic orchestra of Springfield will furnish 
music. There will be a concert from 8 to 9 and 
dancing from 9 till 2. Gallery tickets are on sale at 
No. 17 South College or can be obtained this evening 
at the hall. The dance orders are plain but very 
neat, bearing nothing on the outside covers but the 
seal of the college in the college colors. Caterer 
Daniels of Northampton will furnish refreshments. 
Y. H. Canto is chairman of the prom, committee. 
The patronesses -ere Mas. H. H. Goodell, Mrs. J. E. 
Ostrander, Mrs. R. S. Lull, Mrs. J. B. Paige and 
Mrs. H. Babson. 

— A bill has recently been introducgd into Con- 
gress known as the " Free Homestead Bill " which if 
passed will give to all settlers the areable public lands 
of the west entirely free of cost. These lands are 
now sold to the settlers at a very low price and the 
money received, according to the Morrill Act of 1890 
is distributed among the Colleges of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts ; each state receiving $25,000 annual- 
ly. Of this amount, two-thirds is received by the 
Mass. Agricultural college and if now these lands are 
given to settlers free it v/ill cut down our income 
nearly $17,000. This bill is a very important one in 
the eyes of the people who are interested in educa- 
tion. Forty-nine colleges are now receiving aid from 
this money obtained from the sale of public lands and 
many are almost wholly dependent upon it for its 
support. If the land is thrown open it will be taken 
up, as in the case of Oklahoma, by speculators who 
will claim the land and sell it to settlers in a j'ear or 
two when its value has increased. If the bill is passed 
it will take take the money by means of which such a 
large number from the industrial classes are receiving 
an education and put it into the hands of a few land 
speculators. This bill was introduced into Congress a 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"5 



year ago, but the presidents of the colleges assembled 
in Washington and made a hard fight with the result 
that a compromise was made and for two years there 
has been no trouble. The presidents are now assem- 
bling and are ready to put up a hard fight again. 
What the outcome will be is impossible to predict. 



Impr^SS^O'^S o*^ ^^ Idler. 



We are all interested in the struggle of the Gypsy 
Moth Commission, for a renewal of the two hundred 
thousand dollar appropriation for the extermination of 
the gypsy moth, that has been taking place the last 
fortnight in the Legislature. It looks now as though 
there would not be much of an appropriation as there 
has been some damaging testimony given against the 
work of the extermination of the pest. Some able 
men have said the moth could not be exterminated 
yet the commission has made a good defense. 

The reason for so much opposition is undoubtedly 
the large amount of money now needed to finish the 
extermination which the commission places at a mil- 
lion dollars. Another reason for opposition is that the 
Gypsy Moth Commision alone notes any progress in 
the work. They are undoubtedly sincere and earnest 
in their task but the people are not satisfied with the 
results. 

But the point the Idler wishes to bring out is this. 
There can be nothing done without money. The 
Gypsy Moth Commission will go out of existence if 
there is no more money to back it up ; if there is no 
money appropriated for the care of the bridges in the 
state, the bridges will settle ; and if the bills presented 
to the Legislature to help pay the expenses of this 
college are rejected, and as the college is dependent 
upon this means of obtaining money, then it will settle 
in a way similar to the uncared-for bridges and be- 
come useless. 

I say this, because a bill is up before Congress, 
giving away all the unused government land to any 
one who cares to live on it five years and hold the 
claim. Before this a small fee was charged per 
acre and this small fee, that amounted to a great deal 
considering the amount of land taken, went toward the 
support of the forty-nine state colleges of agriculture 
and mechanic arts that are in the country. This cuts 
away considerable of our income, hence, it necessi- 



tates our depending on the state all the more. This 
Gypsy Moth Commission is to some extent connected 
with our college and if the state refuses the commis- 
sion the appropriation asked for, because it does not 
know whether it is for the public good or not, why 
does it not cast its eyes beyond the swamps of Maiden 
to the State College situated in the hills of Western 
Massachusetts and is known to be a public good, 
and give to it that money or a part of it for its needy 
support. 



THE FREE HOMSETEAD BILL. 

In the far off West where the sun doth hide. 

While we in slumber safe abide, 

There stretching out before the eye 

The rolling plain and prairie lie 

There the prairie grass is matted deep 

Above each rootlet sound asleep. 

And the virgin soils rich treasures hold 

Richer than hoarded miser's gold. 

And the snows of winter cover all 

A foot beneath a generous fall. 

But summer's suns great changes' bring 

The grass shoots forth at signs of spring. 

And plants and flowers there abound 

Close matted o'er the verdant ground. 

How blessed all these beauties seem 

As 'neath the sun they brightly gleam. 

" How shall we consecrate this sod 

Made fruitful by the hand of God ?" 

Thus spoke some sages of our land 

Who constitute a self-made band, 

That fills the wisest of our laws, 

So full of monumental flaws. 

Quoth one, " Already is this soil 

Devoted to the sons of toil. 

A college in each state doth teach 

All sciences within man's reach. 

And thus a noble work is pone 

Upon the plodding farmer's son. 

Why will ye rob him of his right 

To search and find the truth and light. 

Can ye like dumb men stand before 

And watch him knock at learning's door, 

In answer hearing but a sound 

That seems to come from underground. 

A hollow mocking mimicry 

That tries to say ' I'm not for thee. 

Go get thee back unto the farm 

Away from learning and from harm.' 

What would ye do with these fair lands 

Place them in speculators' hands. 

Take from the many for the few 

To swell the purse of men like you," 



ii6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



OUR NEW COMMANDANT. 

After about two years of relaxation we again take 
up the routiue of drill and inspection. This time it is 
under the instruction of Capt. John Anderson, U. S. 
A. retired of Belchertown, who will make his home in 
Amherst. While we regret the loss from the college of 
former Lieut. W. M. Wright, in Captain Anderson it 
would seem that we had found a man worthy of the 
esteem his frank and open manner warrants. 

Our new commandant served with distinction in 
the Civil War, first as a private in Co. E, 1st Michi- 
gan sharpshooters for about a year ; then he was com- 
missioned 2d lieutenant in the 57th Mass. Infantry, 
and served until he was mustered out in 1865. He 
was twice breveted for gallant and meritorious ser- 
vices before Petersburg, Va., first as lieutenant and 
then as captain of Volunteers. After the war he 
entered the regular service with the rank of 2d lieuten- 
ant and was assigned to the 25th infantry. He was 
afterwards transferred to the 1 8th and rose to be cap- 
tain. He retired from the army in 1894 and for the 
past few years has resided in Belchertown. 

Captain Andersoon has had a good deal of experi- 
ence with the average army recruit. May we prove 
to him that educated men make the best soldiers. 



NUMBER TWO. 

it was on the 21st of May, 1893, when John Plum- 
stead of New Hampshire, set out for the West. He 
had only enough money to carry him as far as Chica- 
go, the very spot where he had long wanted to visit, 
and at this date more especially. 

He reached the city about 4 p. m., and after a 
search of two hours, without any success, he felt so 
forlorn and so forsaken that he only turned his face 
toward the East and said as a tear dropped from his 
eyes, " I wish I was back home." 

Just to his right was a fine mansion so much like 
a New Hampshire home where he had worked as a 
coachman. Something seemed to invite him to the 
place. In a moment a new inspiration had possession 
and he took new courage again, he entered the yard 
with an almost noiseless step and as he rang the door 
bell his poor heart fluttered from fright. Then ap- 
peared Mrs. Stanton, a well known millionaire of 
Chicago. 

" What will you have ?" asked Mrs, Stanton, 



Poor John! his face was as white as cotton and his 
speech seem to have gone from him, finally he said 
slowly, " I am looking for some work to do." 

" Who are you and have you any letters of credit ?" 

Then John pulled from his inside pocket a letter 
which read, "This man is an honest and faithful man 
and an expert as coachman." She looked firmly at 
John for she was somewhat chagrin. John appeared 
to her to be everything but an expert. She was in 
need of a coachman and she desired an expert, so 
she asked John to call again after tea and she would 
let him know farther about securing his service and 
besides her daughter Mamie would be in by seven 
o'clock. John thanked her and walked out to return 
again at 7-15. He was as happy as happy could be, 
and in his overflow of joy he walked several streets 
and turned many corners without even noticing a 
street, number or any thing that would be a guide on 
his return. At seven he started back for Mrs. Stan- 
ton's house but he was at sea. He asked many 
officers and citizens, all was in vain, for the only de- 
scription he could give of the house was, " red brick,'" 
At half past nine he arrived at the residence of Mrs. 
Stanton. Mrs. Stanton met him with a weird expres- 
sion : "An honest man," she said. Then poor John 
began to beg for a hearing. He was invited in the 
parlor where he was to meet Miss Mamie Stanton. 
She was very much pleased with John except he 
looked and seemed to have too much yankee in him 
to be honest. So finally John was accepted. 

It is now the 25th of May and five day's journey 
from home had greatly opened his eyes and taught 
him what it meant to battle for success. The follow- 
ing day the sun rose with all of its splendor and the 
birds sang with an unheard melody and all nature 
seem to cater to John's comforts ; now and then a 
heavy gale from the lake fell upon him which was as 
news from home. 

At 8-15 Miss Stanton called for her horses and 
carriage, for she expected Mr. Thomas Smith, a nice 
New Yorker to arrive about 9 a. m. So as John 
went about his work, he could constantly see Miss 
Stanton watching the windows with anxious eyes. At 
nine. Mr. Smith put in his appearance, and the horses 
and carriage were in trim for a long ride to Lincoln 
Park. Mr. Smith was a typical New Yorker, six feet 
four inches, black hair, brownish eyes, and with a, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



117 



sportish air which belonged only to many rich people, 
or those who thing they are rich. He had many 
signs of dissipation, but he had a generous heart and 
was easy to approach. 

They entered the carriage and John started his 
horses off in full gait for the park. On either side as 
they went down broad avenues could be seen fine 
mansions and most costly residences. As they ap- 
proached the entrance of the park, the statues of Lin- 
coln and Grant were first to be seen, and the beauti- 
ful fountains play in many forms ; the flowers were 
fragrant with their morning sweetness and verdure of 
every grass sparkled with dew as a crystal. The 
menageries were attractive with different animals : 
the bear, lion, tiger, panther, wolf, buffaloes were 
among the number that John was interested in, while 
Mr. Smith and Miss Stanton were interested in the 
birds and fishes, which flew, sang and swam in their 
respective places. On their return from the park. 
Miss Stanton and Mr. Smith seemed to be in deep 
meditation and endeavoring to make lasting a fickle 
love which was made four years previous in an opera 
house in New York. There seemed to be a hitch 
somewhere and Mr.Smith seemed to talk most earnest- 
ly to remove all friction. While Miss Stanton with 
her superb form and most attractive appearance seemed 
to pass his words by unnoticed. Miss Stanton was 
real ; her character had been tested by the hardest of 
tests, — luxuries. 

After their arrival home, some time was spent in 
the parlor endeavoring to decide this most momentous 
question, but Miss Stanton in her firmness put such 
decisions off until another day. After tea Mr. Smith 
left for New York, to call again the first of June, the 
meantime he was forced to write one or two letters a 
day as thoughts and arguments seem to come into 
his head. 

During these few days John had had an opportunity 
to make himself known. Many times each day re- 
marked Miss Stanton : " John is honest and honor- 
able in everything, and Oh, that he had a cent to each 
dollar of Mr. Smith, I should at once turn my atten- 
tion to him. He is a man and a man is more than 
money." 

On the third day John was all to her and she was 
compelled to make her feeling known to her mother. 
Her plea to her mother was ineffectual. She said : 



" I love John more in four days than Mr. Smith in 
four years and I have good reasons for so doing." 

Mother : •' Well, my daughter, you must not allow 
your affections to run away with your best judgment. 
It would be an awful scandal for Mamie Stanton to 
marry a coachman ; it would shatter the equilibrium 
of society in this city and bring to naught the teach- 
ings of your parents." 

" Mother," she said, " Mr. Smith is a dude and so 
many times has he called with a saloon odor and he 
has smoked again and again when we go out riding." 

" Well, my child, you must think of Mr. Smith's 
money that can so easily cover up his faults and my 
dear our money matters are not so secure now for we 
have lost more than a million dollars in the failure of 
banks this season, and if something is not done we 
will lose our place in society." 

For comfort, Mamie walked out into the flower 
garden and amused herself with the flowers and also 
had much pleasure in helping John prune some. In 
a few minutes the servant girl came running with a 
letter from Mr. Smith which "Mamie tore open and 
read to John and plainly let him know that he was all 
to her and not the rich dude. 

"But," exclaimed John, "Miss Mamie you had 
better obey your mother for I am poor and my posi- 
tion in life is very humble and while my heart is yours 
yet I am poor and money seems to run the world and 
love too, nowadays." 

The following day Mr. Smith returned and after 
many hours of persuasion assisted by Mrs. Stanton, 
Mamie relented. The ring was placed upon her fin- 
ger and the oath was sealed. The time was set as 
June 10th, Rev. Talmage was to officiate. As the 
day drew nearer Mamie regretted that she had con- 
sented and intimated the same to John. 

Mrs. Stanton while walking down Madison Ave. 
was greatly fascinated with the Ferris wheel which 
had just been finished. The wheel was 250 feet in 
diameter upon which were hung 32 cars as large as 
our trolley cars. The different circular parts of the 
wheel together with the cars were lit up with 5,000 
incandescent lights, and was in beauty like the grand 
staircase opera house at Paris. This wheel was one 
of the great wonders ot the Fair, and each day thou- 
sands came to see and ride on this mighty wheel. It 
required about fifteen minutes for the wheel to re- 



ii8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



volve, and Mrs. Stanton after taking a ride up into 
the heavens and looking down upon our small earth, 
thought it would be a splendid thing for her daughter 
to get married on this wheel. 

A special car was engaged and uniquely arranged 
by Mrs. Stanton. But Mamie and John had been 
planning also. John, Rev. Talmage, Miss Stanton 
were to go in one carriage and Mr. Smith, Mrs. Stan- 
ton and a few neighbors in another. John was to 
drive rather slow and was to reach the station just 
before the wheel started. Mrs. Stanton and her party 
had taken No. 2, while just as the wheel was about to 
start Miss Stanton and her party took No. 1. They 
never missed the other party until they had travelled 
some distance up and then they thought they could 
take them on, on the next " go round." But they 
were sadly wrong. Mamie valued manhood more 
than money and she had put her ingenuities to work 
in opposition to all others. When the wheel reached 
its highest point, John presented the papers made out 
in his name instead of Mr. Smith's which he and Miss 
Stanton had secretly arranged. The ceremony was 
performed in a moment and Mamie Stanton was 
declared by law, Mrs. John Plumstead. 

G. R. B. 



E^schan^es. 



Those editors who still persist in sending their 
papers to us, rolled instead of folded, will confer an 
everlasting favor by folding them hereafter. 

The following, entitled " From Anacreon," is taken 
from The Holy Cross Purple : 

Lo ! the eartli is ever drinking. 

And the trees the dark earth drain, 
And the winds with thick mists sinking 

Slake the thirst of lake and main ; 
Phoebus quaffs the ocean surges 

While his red face gleams with glee 
Friends, if, when the spirit urges, 

I too drink, why censure me ? 

The translator seems to think an explanatory note 
necessary, and so he says : " Members of the W. C. 
T. U. will please observe that the Greek poet was 
illogical. The strict rules of Induction demanded that 
he should drink water. 



Professor J. B. L. Louie in " The Naughty Greek 
Girl. " published by the Arlington High School Carion 
very ingeniously employs the letters of the Greek 
alphabet in an amusing way. While essentially of the 
nursery there is yet such a pleasing combination that 
the lines are readable for all. There is a sort of 
Eugene Field sentiment running through the whole, 
although the use of the Greek with its unknown signi- 
ficance to the juvenile mind, like the lines out of the 
realm of childhood. 

Miss Alpha, though she led her class, 

Was yet a most unlovely lass ; 

She had a little sister Theta. 

And she would often bang and beta 

And push and pinch and pound and pelt her, 

And many a heavy blow she delta ; 

So that the kitten e'en would tnu, 

When 7%^to'5 sufferings she ««. 

This Alpha was so bad to Theta. 

That any time she chanced to meet he, 

She looked as though she longed to eta ; 

And oft against the wall she jammed her, 

And oft she took a stick and lambda ; 

Then Theta cried with noisy clamor, 

And ran and told her grief to Gamma, 

And Gamma, with a pitying ;?5 A 

Would give the little girl some pi. 

And say, "Now, darling mustn't chi." 

Don't fill up your column for school notes with idle 
personals. The reason ought to suggest itself. They 
catalogue nothing worth reading, and certainly nothing 
worth preserving. They make your paper appear like 
a local newspaper. Whoever associates a literary 
character with such a periodical ? The more nearly 
you make your paper purely literary the more you 
elevate its character. School notes of a solid and 
substantial character, however, are valuable for future 
reference, and are to be desired. 

Poetry may be something which it is hard to define, 
but It must be conceded that along with the petty 
thought there must be a beauty and felicity of expres- 
sion. The diction gives the effect and drives home 
the thought. Some poems stand almost solely upon 
the exquisite beauty of their structure. For sublimity 
of thought, and beauty and grandeur of expression, but 
few poems are comparable to " The Chambered 
Nautilus." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



119 



The Western University Courant publishes an 
article by Professor C. M, Des Islets entitled " The 
Moral in Literature." The author inquires; " When 
will people learn, when dealing with a se rmon not to 
ask " Is it beautiful," but, " Is it true ?" — in the case 
of a work of art, not whether it points a moral but, " Is 
it beautiful ?" — in the case of a treatise on morals not, 
"Is it entertaining?" " Is it right?" And he closes 
with this paragraph. "Let us ask of each work what is 
natural for it to give and nothing more. Let us not 
ask of an opera a treatise on the existence of God, 
nor of a work of art a dissertation on ethics." 

Much that he says is unquestionably true. In our 
study of Shakespeare what shall we demand of him ? 
Surely that which we find, a true picture of life. Read 
" King Lear" and you will see as plainly as though it 
were written in words that such is the author's clearly 
defined purpose. Hence, we must judge him by his 
own motives and not by any that we would impute to 
him. Few men nowadays ascribe to Shakespeare 
anything but pure motives, and a correct life even 
though Emerson could not entirely free his mind of 
certain doubts. Walt Whitman is another who will 
undoubtedly find his place when the world shall have 
reached a more perfect adjustment. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



Swallow, a Story of the Great Trek by H. Rider 
Haggard. This book is considered one of the very 
best works of this author. It is a very interesting 
romance of the Boers and Kaffirs of South Africa and 
it is safe ts say that the reader is given a true insight 
into the lives and customs of these people. As a tale 
of wild adventure the book is well worthy of high 
praise. 

Introduction to Physical Chemistry by Prof. James 
Walker, Ph. D., of University College Dundee. 
While this book makes no pretentions of complete- 



ness it will prove of great value to students of Chem- 
istry as a preparation for advanced study and reading. 
Besides describing chemical manipulations and 
processes it gives a very clear account of the various 
theories bearing on this division of the science. The 
author has paid special attention to such points as his 
own experience has shown the most difficult for the 
student. 

The Play of Animals by Karl Groos ; a translation 
from the German by Elizabeth Baldwin. This is the 
first book ever published on this subject and it is of 
unusual value both as science and as theory. 
Although this subject seems comparatively of very 
little importance it has not lacked in investigators as 
shown by the number and range of experiments which 
are referred to by the author. The book begins with 
an examination of Spencer's ' surplus energy ' theory 
for the purpose of getting at the true cause of play. 
Prof. Groos believes this explanation unsatisfactory 
and ascribes to instinct alone its real cause and found- 
ation. Having taken this view he expands it in 
Chapter II. Here we find quotations from numerous 
sources on the relation of instinct to the action of 
animals. There is much diversity of opinion among 
those who have studied this subject as to just where 
the line between reasoning and instinct should be 
drawn. The author, however, is quite emphatic in 
his belief that all youthful play is founded on instinct 
alone which is developed by natural selection. In the 
next two chapters the actual play of animals is dis- 
cussed. Prof. Groos very conveniently classifies the 
plays of animals into experimentation, movement 
plays, hunting plays, love plays and curiosity. The 
first class includes such movements of young animals 
as enables them first to gain control over their own 
organs. Experimental movements are of fundamental 
importance for they train and develope the muscles 
and the mind. Movement plays include walking, 
running, swimming, flying, etc., for no specific pur- 



120 



AGGIE LIFE. 



pose except as a means of pleasure. Our domestic 
cats and dogs furnish us with vivid examples of the 
next two classes— the hunting plays and the fighting 
plays. Among birds we must commonly observe 
examples of love and imitative plays. The author 
describes curiosity as the only purely intellectual form 
of playfulness and which is apparently a special form 
of experimentation. In conclusion is a treatment of 
play from a psychological standpoint followed by an 
appendix on organic selection by the editor, Professor 
Baldwin of Princeton. 



umni. 



72. — E. G. Howe, principal of the preparatory 
school of Illinois University, has recently written a 
book on advanced Elementary Science. 

74. — Bruce S. Zeller, ex-74, has just been elected 
sheriff of Washington county, Maryland, 

74. — W. H. Barston, ex74, is in the real estate 
investment and insurance business at 30 Court St., 
Boston. 

75. — F. A. Rice is with the Pacific Coast Borax 
Company. 

'83. — E. W. Minott's address is 192 Salem St., 
Medford, Mass. 

'91. — Arthur Henry Sawyer and Miss Alice M. 
Harrington were married at Northboro, Wednesday, 
Feb. 14. 

'94. — We regret to announce the death of John 
Austin, ex-'94. Mr. Austin entered our college in 
1890 but did not complete his course here, leaving to 
enter Holy Cross college. During his stay there he 
was very prominent in college athletics, captaining the 
football team during his senior year. After graduat- 
ing from Holy Cross he went to Paris to pursue his 
studies there. In the latter part of 1898 he was 
obliged to return home on account of sickness and 
has since spent most of his time in the Adirondacks. 
There the end came Saturday, Feb. 17. His death 
will be deeply regretted by his friends among our own 
alumni and those of Holy Cross college. 

'95.- — Edward A. White is at the head of the con- 
servatory of the Boston store, Worcester, Mass. 



'96. — -S. W. Fletcher is employed on the Exten- 
sion Staff of the Cornell University Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

'98.— G. H. Wright's address is 48 Fort Green 
Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'99. — F. A. Merrill is spending a few days in 
Amherst. 

1900. — Clayton Risley, ex- 1900, is to return to 
Amherst next summer and will enter the college again 
in fall. 

iiiiiisiii!iEEaain:]iii3iU]niiii:nii!!;3::s.?2[:::isFit!i!:!ESEiiB)iii]t:ii!iiiS!Ei!| 



i is vonr exercise miiklns;? Toinalce theh.Hr<l | 
5 and Fupple Itintl, rub down after every 8yc-U s 
s of exercising, witb I 



i It tones the nervous system, prevents ar.rl | 

i removes etiltncss and sorene.s.s, and is tl:6 | 

S best remedy l^nown for sprain'^ lu use for b 

S f 10 years. Sold in two size bottles— 23 cents g 

§ rnd 60 cents. a 

I I. S. JOI5?5SOM & CO., KostOD, Mass. § 

TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York, 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is proijably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e. In the 

Scimific Jlinericam 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms. $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

iyil)NK&Co.36'Broadway. New York 

Branch Office, 626 F St, WashlnKton, D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^^^4 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fi?ie Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Rememloer these suits are /n-essed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

Kellogg's Blocli, Amherst, Mass. 



We Help Studersts through College 

by eiving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of booths, or band 
ling our useful novehies. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 Van Buren St. , Chicago. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



ONION TEHGHEBS' ReEKGlES OF HPIEHIGfl. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Piilsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New Tork,'Washlngton, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to he filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WASHlNGTOfl, D. C, ori PITTSBUI^G, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. ]S^. BROWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amhbbst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



JEWELER, 



OPTICIAN. 

Stationery, Pictures, Cameras and Supplies. 



Masonic Building, No. 27 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
OflSce, Cook's Block, Amherst, Ma»B. 



AGGiB, Llb'hj. 



Start ill Easiness for Yourself. 



8UCCE88 ASSUMED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 



ica. 



& 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. Tf^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
Wm IN STOVES HHD BHHGES. 

AGENT FOR THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. EILDER, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C, MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and alwa5'8 fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 

•FASHIONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

^p" All suits made in my own work-shops. .^J 
Savings Bank Block, • - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehosetts Jlgpieultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Perciieron Horses and Souioi Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amhbbst, Mjass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOVJN HALL. 

w. ixr. BOirMTO»r, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



River Street, 



NORTHAMPTOK, MASS. 



E. B. niCKINBCIir, U. U. 5. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHEKST, MASS. 



Office Hours: 

S TO 12 A.. Ts/L., 1-30 TO 5 F. 1«£. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IBTJBBEI^ a-003DS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



H^Repairing done tvhile you ujait.^^t 
» PHGENIX now. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT STMXET, AXBER8T, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 
I 



FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON if THOMPSON 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatins Establislimeiit, 



A.e:S^^> -A.Sie>:t:%.t:^ 



H. Xv. ORA-JVEJ »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SSBsSA-TISFA-OTIOIO" a-XTA.IlA.3>TTBBr>. a^S* 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



^Partnilge's Mletlc Outllllis.-* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PftlCES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



S4 and 86 Franhlin Street, - 



BOSTOX, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. Kelton. 



D. B. Kelton. 



K F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POULTRY, VESETBELES, FISH HP OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO. 

Sooiety, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attsntion given to students. 

A.. J. ®OtIIL,.X.^A.ICE:, 

l#j Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

T«l*plien« connection. 




'^ of youi rifle it will not rustaoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, Bliedding water like a 
duck's back. Our l'J7-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about po\vders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes. Quantities, how to 
load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.: 
trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms an a 
m , 1,000 other things. Including many trade 
*■? I secrets never before given to the public 
^M\ I' fee if you will send starnps for postage ta 
M'* The Marlin Firearmg Co., New Haven, Ct. 






The M. I. Spear Book Store. 



established fifty years. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery^ Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

z= :e2 o T o o-iK -^ :f I3:e IS, 



Portrait and Group WorTc a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 

Cabinets, §'2.00 and ^2.50 per doz. 
Cards, ^1.50 and §1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
Studio, 17 Spring Street, - - ^MBEBST, MASS. 



Hmberst Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manaobr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITUREJIND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. 

10 Phoenix Row, 



AR3H, 

Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. RAWSOM 



DEAI.ER rs 



WflTGHES, GliOCfiS, JEWEIiHY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Fens. 



REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A I-AEGE STOCK OF 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WAEE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



NA/E: MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Resrildina; done. 



The fioFthampton M Store. 

L. K. CHEW, Manager. 

CoR. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 

MASS. >GRIGULTO[[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform tbe friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

In limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



4 TAI LOR. )^ 

Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty^ 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OP TRIMMINGS. 



/nba66acbu6ett6 

Haticultural 



• -OFFERS • 

1. A SHORT WINTER COURSIS of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A rOnE. YEABiB' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further iuformatien apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



■4 .H' "^ ^^^^^. 




^Sh ^^,, 




Oolleg:^* 



COL. X. 



NO. 11. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISHINOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — -we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



AMHa$T, Aa$$. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Eoi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AWHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 






W©, 



I. 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $S-00. 



F 



RAIRINO. 



New Soles and Heela, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

In approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



C0LLE6E 
JEWELER 



BENNETT 



GOLLE&E 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

>S®=-EYES FITTED FBEE.^ffla' 
By a graduate of De. Fosteh, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 







HARRY CLARK, 

UNDER THE HOTEIi, 



,»2.t 





VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS., MARCH 14, 1900. 



NO. 11 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, I\1ass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MORRIS BERNARD LANDERS, '00, Editor-in-Chief. 

GEORGE FREEMAN PARMENTER, '00, Business Manager. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, '01, Ass't Business Manager. 
ARTHUR COLEMAN MONAHAN, '00, College Notes. JAMES FRANCIS LEWIS, '00. 

AUSTIN WINFIELD MORRILL, '00, Library Notes. CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, '01, Exchange. 

DANA SANFORD GREELEY, '01, Alumni. CHARLES LESLIE RICE, '01, Athletics. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, '02. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, '02. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ofi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

Howard Baker, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and One Index, 

Reading-Room, Clarence E. Gordon. Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
P. C. Brooks, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'to rials. 



The application made by our athletic officers for 
admission into the New England league we are sorry 
to say was not granted. There were besides ourselves 
two other colleges that were refused admission. The 
grounds taken in our case reflect no discredit on the 
college and the refusal should not dampen our athletic 
ardour in the least. The reason why we were left 
out was, because we have not engaged in track ath- 
letics a sufficiently long time to show that it is to be 
a permanent sport with us. The board appreciated 
our creditable work last season and if we can con- 
tinue along the lines upon which we have started in 
another year '^e will have convinced outsiders that 
with us track athletics have come to stay. 



We have still, however, something worth striving 
for and that is success in the meet with Worcester 
Tech. Our meets in the Drill Hall will aid us in 
accomplishing this end and also in keeping alive enthu- 
siasm. The Life has however a criticism to offer 



with regards to the way in which these are managed. 
By charging a small admission fee at these meets 
there is but little money obtained and at the same 
time perhaps some are deterred from coming. Now 
anything that takes from the general interest in ath- 
letics is an evil and should be dispensed with. 



The Life has watched with interest the workings 
and development of the college Senate and after two 
terms it has come to the conclusion that the work of 
the Senate has not been particularly commendable. 
The Senate as originally intended was to be a body 
acting together for the purpose of correcting any 
abuses which might exist about college. Now has 
the Senate fulfilled its original aims ? In the opinion 
of the Life it has not. Although the Senate has 
been very efticatious in shielding culprits from the con- 
sequences of their wrong doings, yet it has had but 
little influence upon the action of college law breakers. 
In order to be of any benefit to the college the Senate 
must be mainly composed of men who are willing to 
encounter opposition and accept unpopularity if neces- 



122 



AGGIE LIFE. 



sary to the enforcement of a principle. Wtien these 
qualifications are not found in the majority of mem- 
bers of such a body, then it is a detriment rather than 
a benefit. 



Among the many opportunities open to graduates of 
this institution is one of recent origin >vhich affects all 
land grant colleges. A full explanation of the matter 
is given in the report of the Department of Agricul- 
ture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899. 
Throughout his report Secretary Wilson lays great 
stress on the fact that it is difficult to find capable 
scientific assistants. Recognizing this condition of 
affairs the Department of Agriculture offers to gradu- 
ates of the land grant colleges, who fulfil certain re- 
quirements positions as assistants in the various 
bureaus. While the wages are only equal to those 
paid tQ skilled laborers by the department, yet the 
opportunities for study and investigation are more than 
sufficent to compensate for this. Secretary Wilson 
says, •' The steps we have taken toward bringing the 
brightest students of Agricultural Colleges to persecute 
their studies under the supervision of scientists in this 
department is one step necessary to complete the 
educational system. 



The editor has received during the past six months 
but few articles from students outside of the immedi- 
ate board of editors. These few that have been re- 
ceived were however very interesting. One in par- 
ticular that was worthy of the highest praise the edi- 
tor found lying upon his desk. The writer had evi- 
dently been very modest and had signed to his pro- 
duction only his initials. The article in question was 
a poem and began in the following manner : 
" Hence loatlied iVIelancholy 
Of Cerberus and blackest midniglit born." 
The Life wishes here to tender an apology to the 
poet for not printing the poem in its columns but to 
reveal the true author of what Milton has for so long 
been credited with would strike such a death blow to 
his fame that his other works would soon be forgotten. 
And as the Life was not certain but that the unknown 
genius might have written several other poems which 
are claimed by Milton it hesitated to reproduce this 
first one until assured further. The stories which 
have been handed in were all very excellent but in 



most cases the adventures were so intermingled with 
sentiment as to be understood and appreciated only 
by persons similarly afflicted. What the editor wishes 
to impress by these facetious remarks is, that a col- 
lege paper is no place for " cribbed " poetry. In one 
instance it may have printed a story with a vein of 
sentiment running through it but this is no reason why 
it should be immediately deluged with the similar 
experiences of half the college. What a college 
paper wants is the good sound ideas which a man may 
possess, not the abnormal fantasies of an over stimu- 
lated imagination. And above all if enthusiasm must 
find vent in poetic expression let us be charitable 
enough to refrain from awaking a muse that has been 
made almost sacred by the immortal Milton. 



In the year-book of the Department of Agriculturg 
for 1898 we find an article by Dr. A. C. True, entitled, 
" Some types of Agricultural Colleges," in which he 
says : " The only institution in this country which is 
simply an agricultural college is the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College." He says further: " The other 
branches of industrial education are provided for by 
the Ma.ssachusetts Institute of Technology and the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Now how many of 
us who have spent the greater part of our time in 
mastering the mathematical subjects in our course, 
will concede that our college is purely agricultural. 
The average student in our college spends between 
one-half and three-fourths of all his study time during 
his first two years on mathematics. This statement, 
preposterous as it may seem is nevertheless a fact. 
Now while I hold mathematics in the highest respect 
and fully appreciate its value in all branches of indus- 
try, I still maintain that we are carrying this study to 
the extreme. If a student spends three-fourths of his 
ttme on any one study then only one-fourth is left for 
all the other studies, one of which, perhaps, is to be 
his specialty. Our college cannot at present hope to 
send out specialists, nor would" it be advisable for her 
to endeavor to do so. But in giving students general 
knowledge, the special branch which they intend to 
pursue should be borne in mind and if it seems un- 
wise to adopt the elective study system earlier in the 
course than the senior year, then there should not be 
exacted from students a superlative degree of profici- 
ency in studies not directly pertaining to their speci- 



AGrGIE LIF£. 



123 



alty. Having in mind these considerations gained, 
from an observation of tiie matter from a students 
point of view the Life suggests a modification of the 
principle which beUeves in a rigid requirement of ab- 
solute proficiency under pain of dismissal. 



As this is the last issue of The Life under the 
present board it seems an appropriate time to con- 
sider some of the conditions and wants of the college. 
The position of a college paper is a most peculiar one. 
While it is supposed to bring to public notice every 
advance made by the college it is strictly enjoined by 
public sentiment to rem.ain discretely silent regarding 
existing abuses, lest it convey to the outside world an 
exaggerated impression of the college's shortcomings. 
To a certain extent this is a necessary position for a 
paper to assume but it may easily carry this principle 
too far. There is no college which has not connected 
with it faults which should be exposed by the search- 
light of the press, to the gaze of all interested, yet it 
would be folly for a paper to endeavor to start a reform 
by an unqualified presentation of facts, as they might 
be misunderstood by those having only a vague in- 
sight into co-existing circumstances. In considering 
the condition of affairs here at college we are over- 
come by two feelings. The one is a feeling- of col- 
lege pride which takes possession of us when we look 
at those characteristics which mark our college and 
make it stand out amongst purely agricultural colleges, 
preemminent. The other feeling is one of dissatis- 
faction. Our college is engaged in a work which 
must bring her sooner or later into prominence, yet in 
her upward path she is beset by many difficulties. 
We are all aware of the success which our college 
has attained in fitting men for the higher positions. 
By a glance at our alumni list we see our graduates 
occupying most profitable and most remunerative situ- 
ations. The question that comes forward is, why, in 
view of these facts, are there not more students upon 
our rolls ? This is a question not easy to answer. 
The answer which a few years ago might have been 
given was, that the unpopularity of our name drove 
away prospective students. To agree with this state- 
ment would be to say that the people of Massachu- 
setts are governed in their actions by prejudice rather 
than by sound reason. The man who contemplates 
sending his son to college does not choose blindly. 



By the majority of fathers each college is considered 
and its advantages and disadvantages are looked for, 
and in the final choice sentiment plays but little part. 
Another reason that has been given for our scarcity 
of students is our location, but this argument has but 
little weight when we think that in this same town is a 
college of many times our number. Truly the trouble 
lies in something deeper than in these things. The 
trouble is inherent with us and until the disagreeable 
features of the college are eradicated we cannot hope 
for an increase in numbers. 



THE STOLEN PURSE. 

The large dry goods establishment of Cutter & 
Cutter was patronized by the most fashionable people 
in Upton. The heads of the firm were elderly, con- 
servative men who did all in their power to please 
this class of their customers. They were very partic- 
ular in their choice of clerks and when they secured 
one who suited them they retained him many years 
and payed him an excellent salary. 

It was for this reason that John Lane was very glad 
when Mr. Cutter, senior, remarked to him one morn- 
ing, " You may report to Mr. Keendall at the necktie 
counter and we will, try you for a while." 

John had but lately arrived from a small country 
village, beyond whose limits he had never been, until 
he decided to try his fortune in the city. He was not 
afraid of the hard work of the farm, but he felt that 
there were larger opportunities for self-help to be 
found in the city. 

Of course he was rather green at first, but he was 
quick to learn, faithful in his work, and by his hearty 
good-will soon made friends with the other clerks. 
His superiors were well satisfied with his work, and 
when the opportunity came he was advanced to the 
aress-goods counter. It was here that John met his 
first enemy in the person of Harry Strong. 

A position on the dress-goods counter Was consid- 
ered to be one of the best in the store Harry Strong 
had been a salesman in this position for nearly a year. 
He was a fine looking fellow who always dressed in 
the latest style. He had poked fun at John's large 
hands, and ill-fitting clothes when he first entered the 
employ of Cutter & Cutter. He was not over fond of 
work, and was not very steady in his habits. When 
he came in one morning and found John behind the 



124 



AGGIE LIFE. 



counter familiarizing himself with the goods he was to 
sell, Harry was not at all pleased, for he realized that 
henceforth he had a rival. 

By close application John soon became a compe- 
tent salesmen. He treated all his customers alike 
whether rich or poor, and his patience and courtesy, 
even under trying circumstances soon secured for him 
a good trade of his own. Harry, on the contrary, al- 
thongh he was very polite and accommodating with 
those whom he thought would buy heavily, paid but 
little attention to any others. He laughed at John 
when he saw him as he often did, putting back on the 
shelves a lot of goods that a customer had examined 
without buying anything. 

John took his chaffing in good part, however, and 
held strictly to his habit of treating all alike. Harry 
soon noticed that the head of the department was 
treating John with more consideration than himself, 
and he made up his mind that unless he could in 
some way bring John into disrepute with his superiors, 
John would be advanced before him. 

One day his opportunsity arrived. There was among 
Cutter & Cutter's customers a very wealthy woman 
who bought largely f'-om them. She had taken a 
fancy to John and always traded with him. She was 
busily engaged on this day in examing some goods 
that John was showing her. Wishing to see the goods 
in a better light, she took the piece to a window near 
by, and John, after putting up several rolls of goods 
followed her. Mrs. Pond had unwittingly left her 
purse on the counter and Harry who was working near 
by, when he supposed no one was looking, took it and 
slipped it into the pocket of John's store coat which 
was hanging near the counter. 

In a few moments, Mrs. Pond returned, and having 
decided to take the goods, reached out her hand to 
where she had left her purse. Not finding it there, 
she exclaimed in alarm. " Why where has my purse 
gone? I left it here on the counter just a moment 
ago." " Are you sure you left it there ? " asked 
John. " Yes, I am positive I did," she answered, 
searching in vain for it in her shopping- bag. " As 
there has been no one else at the counter," said 
John, " it is very singular what could have become of 
it." " I don't understand it," said Mrs. Pond, " I will 
see Mr. Cutter about it at once," and bidding John 
" Good-day " she went directly to the office. 



Harry Strong was soon summoned to the office 
only to return in a short time to tell John that Mr. 
Cutter wished to talk with him. John went to the 
office thinking it only natural Mr. Cutter should wish 
to question him about the loss of the purse and still 
wondering where it could have gone. As soon as he 
had closed the office door behind him Mr. Cutter said 
to him, " John, what have you in your pocket there ?" 
On putting his hand into the pocket indicated, to his 
utter surprise and amazerhent John pulled out a 
purse. " Humph ! " ejaculated Mr. Cutter, " I guess 
that's what we are looking for. How do you account 
for that, sir ? '' "I have nothing to say, said John, 
" except that until this minute I did not know it was 
there." " You may go," said Mr. Cutter. John left 
the office with a sinking heart. Some one had played 
a mean trick on him, but who could it be ? No one 
unless it was Harry Strong, and even he would not be 
so mean, he thought. When he left the store that 
night his heart sank still more when the superinten- 
dent placed in his hands a pay envelope, with the re- 
mark that his services were no longer required. 

After passing a sleepless night, John took a walk 
the next morning to try and compose his mind. He 
felt that it was discouraging after trying so hard to do 
what was right, to be thought a thief. But how could 
he prove his innocence ? On returning to his board- 
ing-house, he found awaiting him there a note asking 
him to come at once to the office of Cutter & Cutter. 

When he was once more in the -presence of Mr. 
Cutter, the latter informed him that he had been mis- 
taken in his judgement of the previous day, and that 
the real culprit was the one who had informed against 
him, Harry Strong. A clerk in another part of the 
store had witnessed the transferrence of the purse from 
the counter to John's coat. " Oh yes, I remember 
now," said John, " I had just'come from luncheon when 
I waited on Mrs. Pond and did not put on my store- 
coat until she had gone." 

" I think I know why he did it," continued Mr. Cut- 
ter, •' so I have simply discharged him. Had he 
been faithful in his work he need not have feared your 
competition. You may take your place at the counter 
now, and by the way. he added as he ushered John 
out of the office, there will be a vacancy in the posi- 
tion of floor- walker which you may hear from soon." 

Arthur L. Dacy. 



AGGIE 



JFE 



125 



LINKS OF A LIFE. 

Three children, two boys and a girl, were playing 
together by the roadside. Suddenly the smaller boy 
ran and picked a flower to carry to the little girl. 
Before he could give it to her, the larger boy rushed 
upon him and knocked him down. Picking up the 
flower he presented it to his companion. "I won't 
take it from you," she said, " it was real mean of you 
to strike Ralph like that. Did it hurt you very much, 
Ralph? I am ever so sorry. Do you kno^, Ralph, 
I like you a great deal better than I do Gilbert." And 
Ralph answered, '* Then I don't care if he did hit me. 
No, he didn't hurt me very much." 

The old court-house was filling to overflowing. As 
I was forced to spend the day in the city, I allowed 
myself to drift half unconsciously with the swiftly- mov- 
ing tide. 

At last I found myself stranded in a corner of the 
court-room. An old man was standing beside me. 

" I am a stranger here," said I, '• Can you tell me 
the cause of so large an attendance ? 

" Why it's Ralph Marston's trial — our Ralph you 
know. It's forgery, and it looks like a clear 
case against him, too. And yet it does not seem as if 
he could have done it. Why he was just as steady 
and honest as a man could wish all his life, and when 
he came back from college and went into the bank 
there wasn't a man here who wouldn't 'a trusted him. 
He was as gay as you please too even courting the 
cashier's daughter. They were as good as engaged, 
they say. Then all of a sudden this business cam.e 
out, and now it seems to be all up with him, poor 
fellow. Even after he was arrested we couldn't believe 
It of him, but when Gilbert Wainley said he saw Ralph 
do it, why of course that settled it. His engagement 
was broken off at once, and they say Wainley will be 
the lucky man now." 

Doubtless the man would have rattled on, but just 
then a great hush came over the assembly. The jury 
had just entered. 

"Mr. Foreman, have you decided upon a verdict?" 
'• We have." 

" Is the defendant guilty or not guilty? 
" Guilty !" 

The single word seemed to set everyone in motion. 
The next case was called, the sheriff led the prisoner 
away, and the vast crowd surged outside, tQ scatter in 



every direction. A few days later I read that Marston 
had received a sentence of fifteen years. 

Time went rapidly with me, though for the convict 
it must have dragged wearily enough. It was sixteen 
years before I visited the city again. Happening to 
recollect the incident, I made inquiries. At last I 
found a man who remembered the case. 

" Ralph Marston? " said he." He got out of prison 
over a year ago and came back here. Did you know 
him before he was arrested ?" 

I assured him that I did not- 

" Well, sir, you never saw a man so changed, com- 
pletely broken down in mind and body and all his 
ambition gone. He has a hard time all around. He 
gets a few odd jobs now and then but you see nobody 
dares to trust him, Wainley? Oh, he's an elder- 
man, and rising fast. He says he never fails in what he 
undertakes and he's pretty near right too. He has 
never failed but once. That was when he proposed to 
Cashier Lathrops' daughter. She was engaged to 
Marston and never married. Her folks broke the 
engagement and took her to Europe but she has always 
stood by him and thinks he is innocent. She would 
even have married him when he was released, but he 
'Vouldn't hear to the idea of her being a convict's wife. 

The next day as I was walking along, a bicycle 
dashed by me, swerved to the right and then collapsed. 
The rider fell heavily to the ground. I ran to his 
assistance but found that he had received internal 
injuries which would be fatal. On seeing me he 
managed to gasp out, " In my inside pocket, a paper. 
Give it to Ralph Marston. I was the man who forged 
the check. Ask him to forgive" — and then he died. 

After a long search I found Marston. then in the 
last stages of despair. I gave him the document 
which proved to be a full confession. Five minutes 
later he was dashing up the street like a madman, the 
joyful tears trickling down his cheeks. 

A week later I saw him for the last time. He was 
boarding a train for the west and a sweet-faced woman 
was at his side. Amid happier scenes where the past 
could be forgotten, they were about to begin life anew 
— and together. 



— Prof. S. T. Maynard entertained the members 
of the Amherst Grange recently by a talk on his trip 
to California during the sumrrier of '99. 



126 



AGGIE LIFE. 



mprfsssonj 



^n 



ier. 



To the Idler has been alloted the task of bidding 
good bye to the readers of the Life for the present 
board of editors. The board during the six months 
which it has served, has passed through all the trials 
which fall to the lot of editors in general and many 
trials which to most people are unknown. While the 
torrent has swept around him, the Idler has remained 
serene and unmoved. The angry waves of dissention 
which have buffeted others about have fallen harm- 
lessly over the Idler. Wrapted up in himself and 
keeping his own counsel, he has even been able to take 
some enjoyment out of the struggles of ambitions 
wranglers. He has watched them in the arena of 
cheap politics and has found himself repeating in dis- 
gust the "words of the poet. 

" 'Twill be long ere I go there." 

But the Idler must refrain. He has expressly 
promised not to censure. Not long ago he discovered 
that the Aggie Life had a constitution and by laws to 
govern it. Evidently these have been kept in hiding 
a number of years. They come out nevertheless none 
the worse for their long Imprisonment. One member 
of the Life Board remarked a short time ago " It's 
mighty inconvenient this having a constitution." So 
it is, my friend, for those who wish to abuse theprivelege 
which they have of voting for new members to the 
board. But this is very much like censure. 

How to express the feelings which possess him on 
coming before his readers for the last time is a per- 
plexing problem to the Idler. In the past he has 
aimed to bring his readers to a realization of the true 
state of affairs by dealing with serious matter in a 
light and trivial way and by giving such serious con- 
sideration to the more trivial matters which needed cor- 
rection as to make them ridiculous. The Idler appreci- 
ates that like everyone who essays to express himself 
publicly, he has two classes of readers to whom he must 
say goodbye. To the one class he can express him 
no better than by using the words of Thomas Moore. 
"With all my soul then let us part 
Since both are anxious to be free," 

For the other class of readers he has the kindest of 
words. For the new board of editors he has a word 
of advise and counsel. Fellows do your work. It 
makes no difference how efficient your chief rnay be 



remember that he will be held responsible for all your 
shortcomings. If you are assigned to do any particular 
work on the board, do it conscienciously. If you are 
called on to \vrite an article for the paper either present 
your article or present your resignation. And now 
readers adieu. 



^olle^f j^ot^S- 



— Term closes March 22. 

— F. R. Church is at home on account of sickness. 

— V. H. Gurnsy is sick with the measles at his 
room at Mrs. Gilbert's. 

— R. D. Potter and P. G. Vance of the Freshman 
class have left College. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker delivered a lecture at North- 
field on Friday, March 2. 

— Mark H. Munson has returned home, having 
been seized with the measles. 

— -Winthrop V. Tower was elected in the place of 
E. B. Snell who resigned his position as track captain 

— Dr. C. A. Goessmann and family who have been 
in Germany since the latter part of August last is ex- 
pected home early in June. 

— W. L. Hood, '03, had the misfortune to fall upon 
the rough frozen ground during the past week and to 
break his leg. The break is in the fibula bone.slightly 
above the ankle. 

— The last Senior debate for the term takes place 
upon Friday, March 16th. The question is, " Re- 
solved, that the United States should build, own and 
control the Isthmus canal." 

— Mrs. M. F. Dickinson, the mother of the late 
Captain Walter M. Dickinson, died at her home on 
the North Amherst road on March 7th. The funeral 
was held on Friday, March 9th. 

— The Ways and Means Committee of the Legis- 
lature reported favorably upon the bill which had been 
introduced providing for an annual appropriation of 
$8000 for four years for the College. 

— At the annual town meeting of the citizens of 
Amherst held on Monday, March 5, Prof. G. F. 
Mills was chosen moderator. The selectmen had 
appointed Dr. G. E. Stone, town tree warden. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



127 



— The class of '03 held a class meeting Monday and 
elected the following officers for the spring term : 
Pres't, Edward B. Snell ; vice-pres't, Richard H. 
Robertson ; sec'y and treas., Gerald D. Jones ; class 
captain, George L. Barrus ; sergeant-at-arms, Josiah 
W. Parsons ; historian, Neil F. Monahan. 

— President H. H. Goodell has returned from 
Washington where he has spent considerable time in 
the interest of the College, working with the presi- 
dents of the other Land Grant college to prevent the 
passage of the Free Homestead bill which would dis- 
pose of the public lands and cut off the income of the 
College. An amendment has been added to the bill, 
containing the proviso that if the proceeds from the 
sale of public land are not sufficient to pay the regu- 
lar annuities to the land-grant colleges, the deficit will 
be paid|from the treasury of the U. S. This bill is 
before the House. Another Free Homestead bill 
has been introduced into the Senate, this later one 
containing no provision for the colleges in case of a 
deficit. There is another bill of considerable impor- 
tance to the College now before Congress. It is a 
bill providing for the printing and distribution of public 
documents. An amendment has been introduced, 
making all land-grant colleges a depository for all 
such documents. 

— An amusing incident related about Captain Cor- 
nish may be of interest to those who were acquainted 
with him when he was commandant at this College. 
One Sunday evening the Captain suspecting that sev- 
eral of his company were absent without leave, ordered 
an inspection of quarters with the result that fourteen 
men were reported missing. The following morning 
the Captain ordered the men to report to him. Upon 
being questioned they all entered the plea that they 
were attending religious services which were con- 
ducted by a colored preacher in a church a few miles 
away. The men were dismissed without being repri- 
manded and were congratulating themselves on their 
escape when an order reached them to report to the 
colored preacher for religious instruction. The 
preacher was greatly delighted at the opportunity to 
address the soldiers and lengthened out his usual half 
hour sermon to something over an hour. During 
two weeks that followed this the men were required to 
listen to the preacher seven times. The captain felt 



very much satisfied at the result of the experiment 
as he had greatly pleased the preacher, given the 
men what they so much desired and enforced disci- 
pline. 

— The following article appeared in the Amherst 
Record, March 7th: — " A dairy institute will be held 
at the chapel on the Agricultural College grounds 
next Wednesday, the 14th inst. with sessions both 
morning and afternoon. Subjects of interest to milk- 
producers and butter-makers will be considered. Ex- 
hibits of butter made by the dairy students will be 
judged by experfs. There will be practical adminis- 
tration in the use of separators, combined churn and 
butter workers, etc., etc. Coffee and cold lunch will 
be served free. The program is as follows : 10-30 
A. M. Address by F. W. Bouska, instructor and ex- 
pert butter-maker, ' The over-run in butter ; ' address 
by Prof. W. P. Brooks, ' Manuring the crops on a 
dairy farm;' discussion and question-box; lunch. 
1-30 p. M. Address by 0. C. Douglass of Boston, 
' The scores on the butter exhibited, reasons there- 
for ; " address by N.I. Bowditch of Framingham, 
' Making milk for the private trade ; ' address by 
Prof. F. S. Cooley, ' The Massachusetts creamery ; ' 
discussion and question -box. From 9 to II a. m. 
the students of the dairy school will operate the vari- 
ous separators and butter-workers and give a practical 
demonstration of the Babcock test. Farmers are 
requested to bring in samples of milk and cream to 
be tested. 



NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE. 

During the early part of Hawthorne's life he seems 
to have had no intimate friends but lived very much 
within himself. He was lame for several years but 
being naturally strong and healthy, soon outgrew this 
trouble. 

Hawthorne entered Bowdoin college when but sev- 
enteen years old. While here we learn more about 
him, since he was thrown into contact with other 
young men and formed a few fast friendships which 
continued until death intervened. It may be interest- 
ing to note that Longfellow was one of Haw- 
thorne's classmates, but he became more intimate 
with Franklin Pierce, afterward President of the 
United States. Horatio Bridge and Cilley were also 
among Hawthorne's friends. Although Hawthorne 



128 



AGGIE LIFE. 



roomed with Mason, they were not very congenial ; 
both, however, were well-bred and amiable, so they 
lived together more or less harmoniously for two 
years. There is no picture of him which was taken 
at that time, so we have to rely upon what his friends 
say of him. Bridge describes Hawthorne as being 
slender, having a massive head, with dark, brilliant 
and very expressive eyes, heavy eyebrows and a pro- 
fusion of dark hair. His figure was somewhat singu- 
lar, owing to his carrying his head a little on one side ; 
but his walk was square and firm, and his manner 
one of self-respect and reservation. Although quiet 
and very amiable he had great pluck and determina- 
tion. An example of this characteristic showed it- 
self several years later, when a lady incited him to 
quarrel with one of his best friends on account of a 
groundless pique of hers. He went to Washington 
for the* purpose of challenging the gentleman, and 
though ample explanations were made, showing that 
his friend acted with the utmost honor it was with 
great difficulty that Pierce and Cilley, who were his 
advisers, could persuade him not to fight. Hawthorne 
was a gentleman in the best sense of the word ; al- 
ways manly, cool, self-poised and brave. He was 
neither morose nor sentimental, and, although tacti- 
turn, was always cheerful with his chosen companions. 

Hawthorne and Longfellow became very intimate 
after leaving college, and it was from him that Long- 
fellow obtained his plot for " Evangeline." He was 
also well acquainted with George Bancroft, for it was 
through him that Hawthorne became a weigher in 
the Boston Custom House in eighteen hundred thirty- 
nine. Robert and Elizabeth Barret Browning were 
among the novelist's acquaintances. 

When Pierce became president, he sent Hawthorne 
to Liverpool as United States consul. It was while 
there that, as our representative, he had to make a 
speech in reply to a toast. He was very much 
frightened and so nervous that his knees shook and 
his hair fairly stood on end ; after saying a few words 
this wore off, and he made one of the best speeches 
ever given by a consul. 

Henry Bright in his " Song of the Consul Haw- 
thorn," gives an excellent description of the man. 

" Should you ask me '' Who is Hawthorne ? 
Who is Hawthorne that you mention ? ' 
I shoul4 answer, I should tell you, 



He's a Yankee, who has written 

Many books you must have heard of, 
For he wrote ' The Scarlet Letter,' 

And 'The House of Seven Gables,' 
Wrote too, ' Rappacine's Daughter,' 

And a lot of other stories, 
Some are long and some are shorter ; 

Some are good and some are better. 
And this Hawthorne is a consul, 

Sitting in a dismal office — 
Full of mates and full of captains, 
Full of sailors and of niggers, — 

And he lords it over Yankees. 
Do you ask me, ' Tell me further. 

Of this Consul, of this Hawthorne ? ' 
I should say, ' He is a sinner — 

Never goes inside a chapel. 
Only sees outsides of chapels. 

Says his prayers without a chapel, 
I should say that he is lazy. 

Very lazy, good for nothing ; 
Hardly ever goes to dinners. 

Never goes to balls or soirees ; 
Thinks one friend worth twenty friendly, 

Cares for love, but not for liking ; 
Hardly knows a dozen people.' " 



— G. K. 



«c 



The manager of the Athletic association arranged a 
handicap meet for Saturday, March 10. He received 
seven entries for this meet and consequently was 
forced to forego it. The conclusion that we must 
draw from this is obvious, either the students are 
falling back into that old listless state, or they inten- 
tionly mean to give a black eye to track athletics. 
Either of these conclusions is humiliating and I sin- 
cerely trust neither is the truth. 

Our manager has succeeded in scheduling a meet 
with Worcester Tech, which while it is not exactly 
what we wanted, will serve to give us practice for a 
meet shortly before commencement. If we hope to 
turn out anything like a successful team we must 
begin to boom our stock with enthusiasm now. Such 
a failure as last Saturday's must discourage even the 
first attempts. 

The writer has noticed that the manager has been 
forced to post the names of more than a third of the 
students, for not paying the tax of one dollar levied 



AGGIE LIFE. 



i2g 



three months ago. The fact alone is enough to put 
our track team as well as our baseball team away 
behind, for until the money is paid in, or at least until 
enough of it is paid in to pay the debts of the associ- 
ation, no money can be raised for baseball. 

It is well to look the matter square in the face. 
We hear a great deal about the baseball team. The 
schedule has been arranged and now it remains for 
each man to say whether the season shall be played. 
Each man that has not paid his athletic tax cannot 
but feel guilty and if the baseball team is killed in the 
start he can congratulate himself on giving it indi- 
rectly a death blow. 



TAKING COLLEGE TOO SERIOUSLY. 

When the average student comes to college, he 
has certain fixed objects and purposes in view. Above 
all, he is deeply impressed with the idea that he is 
there for an education, and that great opportunities 
are before him which he must utilize to the fullest 
extent. Moreover, that view is assiduously held up 
to him by anxious parents and well-meaning friends ; 
all the biographies of great men of whom he has read 
dwell at great length on the great studiousness of their 
respective heroes ; and finally, as soon as the term 
begins, the professors begin on the same story, with 
incessant demands for more study. What is the 
result ? The new student believes it all — he believes 
anything at that stage — and if he is conscientious and 
of a naturally studious turn of mind he starts in by 
putting hours and hours on his lessons, in the most 
serious manner possible, firmly believing that if he 
fails in a recitation, his education is ruined forever. 
This state of things goes on for about a week, and then 
the embryo student discovers that after all his time is 
limited. In other words, if he spends every moment 
in study he cannot do anything else. 

Three courses suggest themselves to him : the first 
to continue to live simply for his lessons ; the second, 
to live entirely for outside affairs ; and third, to 
judiciously combine the two. As he chooses, so rests 
the measure of success which he achieves in his col- 
lege career. 

It is the man who elects the first class who can 
alone be said to take college too seriously. Such a 
student withdraws from his companions and becomes 



in common parlance, a '• grind." He is never seen 
on the gridiron or the diamond, he never has time to 
write for the college publications or to take part in 
social affairs. All his activities are centered in his 
books, his highest ambition to get a good term mark, 
his chief enjoyment to shine in his recitations. The 
results are that he finds himself shunned as he shuns 
others, and soon becomes an object of universal dis- 
like and contempt. 

Such a student doubtless imagines that he is 
achieving the object for which he came to college. 
But as a matter of fact, is he doing so ? He is in- 
deed storing up a mass of facts and figures, and ab- 
sorbing information as a sponge absorbs water ; but 
when the time comes when his course is over, he 
finds that he has simply thrown himself out of touch 
with the world by his hermit life, and that he has 
nothing to offer to the world which the world wishes to 
buy. And the result isfailure— dismal, disheartening, 
but certain and irreparable. 

But aside from the harm which he is doing to him- 
self, there is another reason why he should not shut 
himself up like a crab in his shell. When a man 
enters college, he becomes a unit of a larger whole 
and to that whole he owes certain duties. The stu- 
dent body needs him and is entitled to his aid in any 
way he can give it. If he can play football, he has 
no right to refuse to play ; if he has literary ability, he 
has no right to keep it to himself. His talents are 
common property which rightly used will return to him 
the brighter and better for the using. 

The man who takes too serious a view of college 
work enjoys but a short-sighted and narrow view of life. 
Common-sense should teach him that it is by no 
means absolutely necessary to learn every word of 
every lesson. There will often be a host of details 
wh-iph cMinot be remembered if learned ever so care- 
fully. Moreover, it is not indispensable that every 
recitation be attended ; there are frequently times 
when a student will learn more from something going 
on outside than from the routine work. Therefore it 
seems as if every system of cuts ought to make allow- 
ance for this. The student ought to know what the 
best is and aim to secure it. And by so doing without 
making himself round-shouldered in an attempt to 
attain the unattainable, he will truly receive a broad 
and liberal education. 



130 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SCIENTIFIC AND CLASSICAL STUDY. 

We are living in an age when it is becoming very 
popular to decry the value of classical education, and 
people are coming more and more to believe that the 
best education is the one which trains a man along 
the lines of scientific and practical work. They be- 
lieve in a "practical" education as opposed to one 
which trains a man along literary and imaginative 
lines. They say " Of what use will be a knowledge 
of Shakespeare, or Milton, or of History or Psychol- 
ogy, to a practical man of affairs in the coming 20th 
century ? What the world needs is men who shall be 
leaders in the great business and commercial life of 
our country." They do not want idle dreamers, and 
there is some justice in such views as those just 
stated. How many graduates have gone out from 
our colleges in times past, and made failures in life 
simply because their knowledge was of a kind which 
could not be applied to the world's needs. " Knowl- 
edge is Power," but if it cannot be made to supply 
any need of man it is almost worse than useless. 

While the danger spoken of is a great one, is there 
not also a danger in the other extreme ? The study 
of such subjects as Chemistry, Botany, Medicine, 
Agriculture, and Mathematics are of great practical 
importance. Men with educations along these lines 
are sure of positions, and there is a great work for 
them to do. But if we were to consider all the bene- 
fits to be derived from a purely " practical " educa- 
tion we should find that after all there is something 
lacking. 

Dollars and cents, or scientific attainments, are 
not the highest things in the world for which to strive, 
Man is a social being, and in order to have the great- 
est possible influence for good in the world he must 
understand men and human nature ; he must have 
some knowledge of the great feelings which have in- 
fluenced the human race in the past as well as un- 
derstand the world of to-day. His higher nature 
should be developed and broadened by contact with 
such men as Milton, Shakespeare, Longfellow, Lowell, 
Whittier, and all the great lights of the world. 

To attain this desirable end and avoid becoming 
narrow and one-sided, like those persons we have 
met who can talk of nothing but their " hobby," he 
must have a liberal education consisting of the classi- 
cal as well as scientific studies. To thoroughly get 



into sympathy with the great ideals of the race, what 
is better than the study of the languages, of literature, 
of history, and kindred subjects ? And when these 
latter are combined with the "practical " subjects in 
a judicious manner, it would seem as though we have 
an ideal for a liberal education. 



ATTENDANCE. 

At a meeting of the Faculty of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College held April 6th. 1895. it was 
voted : — ■ 

I. That increased responsibility for attendance of 
students upon class exercises be assumed by each 
professor. 

II. That this fact be constantly insisted upon, that 
all excuses are from attendance and not from assigned 
work, and that frequent absences, even though excused 
may affect the class rank of the student. Absences 
from laboratory or from field work will be regarded in 
determining such class rank. 

III. That excuses from church or chapel shall be 
granted or allowed by the President : all others, by the 
instructor in charge. 

IV. That excuses for absence shall be presented 
to the instructor before such absence. If this should 
be impossible, then the student shall present his excuse 
at the earliest possible time thereafter. 

V. That all excused absences be reported at the 
end of the term to the registrar ; and' each unexcused 
absence be reported to the President within twenty- 
four hours from the time the instructor declares it 
unexcused. 

VI. That we commend to the careful considera- 
tion of the Faculty the fact that the regular attendance 
of Faculty and students upon college duty is indispensa- 
ble to the successful working of the system now pro- 
posed and to the promotion of the highest interests of 
the college. 

VII. That a copy of the recommendations now 
adopted be furnished to each member of the Faculty. 

A true copy, 

C. S. Walker, Secretary. 

The above rules although adopted some time ago 
are still in force. Special attention is called to article 
four as it applies to drill exercises as well as recita- 
tions in other studies. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



131 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

In the February number of Entomological News is 
an article by Prof. C. H. Fernald entitled '-Zoology 
as Taught at Massachusetts Agricultural College." 

Among the popular books of fiction recently added 
to the library are the following : When Knighthood was 
in Flower hy Caskoden, Janice Meredith by Ford, and 
A Manifest Destiny by Julia Magruder. 

A recent number of Science contains the secre- 
tary's report of the third meeting of the Society for 
Plant Morphology aud Physiology. In this report is a 
resume of a paper read by Dr. G. E. Stone on the 
geotropic experiments which have been carried on at 
the college labratory. 

Die Natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien by Engler and 
Prantl. This is quite an extensive work being in 
twelve volumes the first of which appeared in 1 889 
while the last one has just been published. Being 
written in German the usefulness of the work is lim- 
ited to those who are familiar with that language. 
The work is, however, considered among the very 
best of botanical literature. 

Facing the Twentieth Century published and donated 
to the library by the American Union League Society 
James N. King secretary and editor. This book is 
very attractive in its general appearance and contains 
much of interest to every patriotic American. Its 
aim is to give some insight into the power and peril 
of our country as it is about to move into the new 
century. The power lies chiefly in the American 
institutions ot state, church and school. The peril 
■ here considered to be of the most consequence is the 
politico -ecclessiastical menace to these institutions. 
The means for protection are the common schools, 
restricted immigration, a perfect civil service and the 
many patriotic organizations. The closing chapter 
entitled Manifest Destiny is of especial literary merit 
and contains many ideas which demand the careful 
consideration of every thoughtful person. " Is it not 
more than probable that a part of our privileged des- 
tiny shall be to stand side by side with the English- 
speaking Anglo-Saxon civilizations and dictate the 
permanent peace of the world, and in the historic con- 
test between prerogative and privilege secure the tri- 
umphs of privilege for man against the oppressions of 
the prerogative of tyranny ?" 



E^chan^ej. 



One of our most interesting high school exchanges 
is the Steele Review, which comes to us from the far 
away state of Ohio. The February number, neatly 
bound in a tasteful cover, is now on our table. It is 
named the " Spur Issue " which may signify that un- 
usal effort was put forth to make it an excellent one. 
It is certainly an attractive paper, and a perusal of its 
contents in no way diminishes the good impression 
gotten from a glance at the natty cover. It is the 
writer's opinion, however, that literary matter is more 
properly separated from than joined with the adver- 
tising matter. With a paper of such prepossessing 
appearance as that of the Review such a plan of sepa- 
tion would seem to be possible ; that is, we should 
think there would be no financial difficulty. The 
only adverse criticism we would offer is concerning 
this principle of mixing the literary and advertising 
matter. May not the Review's plan of arrangement 
be improved upon in this respect ? 

There are all kinds of people in this world, some 
like one thing, some another. In the college world 
we see marked differences in taste in the election of 
studies. The dreaming mind can find no use for 
conic sections. The intensely practical mind can see 
no use in bothering ones noddle with things rhat are 
" dead and gone." We can almost picture to our- 
selves the man who wrote the following lines : 

LATIN. 
"All the people dead who wrote it, 
All the people dead who spoke it, 
All the people die who learn it. 
Blessed death! They surely earn it." 

The value of solitude is made the subject of a col- 
umn of terse and pointed language in The Skirmisher. 
Besides being full of thought the article possesses the 
additional merit of affording a good example of the 
"incompressible paragraph." The ability to write 
concentrated, and at the same time, luminous English 
is an enviable one. The short story, the essay, the 
editorial, are all excellent. Practice for the cultiva- 
tion of an ability to write something which this ex- 
press-train-rate-of-going generation will pause to read. 
Care must be taken, however, to be explicit. Over- 
loaded paragraphs are dangerous, as few people will 
pause to read between the lines, and when a word 



132 



AGGIE LIFE. 



stand for a paragraph, which for its development de- 
pends upon the aptitude of the reader, the tendency is 
to pass it by. 



Ivamni 



72. — The address of Frank C. Cowles is 10 East 
Worcester St., Worcester, Mass. He is with Nor- 
cross Brothers. Residence 223 1-2 Pleasant St. 

'82. — Readers of the Life will regret to hear of 
the death of Mrs. Beach, wife of Charles E. Beach, 
West Hartford, Conn. 

'88.- — E. E. Knapp is with the E. & G. Brooks 
Iron Company, Birdsboro, Pa. 

'92. — Robert H. Smith, who has recently returned 
from Gottengen university, Germany, is seriously ill 
at his home in Amherst. 

'95. — D. C. Potter is at Farmington, Conn. 

'95. — Henry A. Ballou, Instructor in Botany Conn. 
Agricultural college, Storrs, Conn. 

'95.— G. A. Billings. Address, Woodbine, N. J. 



'96. — The engagement of S. M. Fletcher to 

Miss Edith A. Wallace, of Amherst, is announced. 

Mr. Fletcher is studying for a degree at Cornell 
university. 

'96,— W. L. Pentecost. Ard-Na-Clachau farm, 
Shrewsbury, Mass. Sup't of Creamery and butter- 
making. 

'97. — The engagement of Clayton Palmer to Miss 
Jessie S. Bowen, the librarian at the Conn. Agricult- 
ural college, has been announced. Mr. Palmer is at 
the state normal school, Mansfield, Pa. 

'97.— Charles A. Norton, Address 20, Grove St., 
Lynn, Mass. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 





That is Equally Efficacious for 
Internal and External Use. 

Johnson's Anodyne X.iniment is the oldest, safest, most 
reliable liniment on earth. It is naade of pure vegetable 
Ingredients, prepared with the utmost skill and care, and 
it may be taken internally and given to children as safely 
as it may be used for rubbing the surface of inflamed por- 
tions of the body. It was originated in 1!<10, and has 
been constantly in use since then for the relief and cure ^ 
of inflammation, and all the many diseases which begin ^ 
with inflammation. It has won highest praiKC from alh- "* 
letes, especially from golf players, for iis value in 
strengthening, toning, invigorating the muscles and the 
ciire of spriiins, stitliiess and soreness. It is a preventive 
of "golf urm." It is the first thing needed in all the acci- 
dents athletes are accustomed to. After a bicycle riclc cr 
any exercise, briskly rubbing the muscles wl'.h JOHN- 
BON'S Anodyne Liniment will double the value of the 
exercise. It keeps the muscles firm, the joints supple 
and the skin healthful. 




^17005/ t]g 



has an unequalled record of nearly a Cen tury of Cures. 

It should be kept on hand for prompt treatment of colic, 
crarapa, dinrrha'a, cholera morbus, bites, bruises, burns, 
stings, chaling, chilblains, colds, coughs, cror.p, catarrh, 
bronchitis, la grippe, lameness, muscle soreness, and 
pain and inflammation in any part of the body. In two 
size bottles, 25 cents and SO cents. The larger size ia 
more economical, holding three of the smaller. 

I. S, JOHNSON & CO. 22 Custom House £1., Boston, Mass. 

Write for a free copy of "Treatment for 
X>iseases and Care of the Sick Uoom." 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. recelye 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jfinericati. 



A handsomely illustrated weekly. 



Largest cir- 
Terms, f" 



culation of any scientific journal. 

year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.36'B'«'adway, New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St.. WashlDKton. D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits are pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made andtrimmed in the latest style. 



Kelloggf's Block, AiiaUerst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



ONION TEiCPEBS' HlflOlES OF mVl 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pil!;sburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New Tork,- Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancie." 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

wasHifiGTON, D. C, op PITTSBUHG, PR. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. ]Sr. BKOWX, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



OiFicE Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien desired. 



M. A. C. Students desirous of first class work at reasonable 
prices will find the following list of interest. 

Main Springs, $1.00, warranted one year. Cleaning, $1 to $2.50. 
Balance Stafi, $1.50. 

JEWELRY AMD OPTSCAL WORK. 

Plain Gold Rings soldered, 25c. to 35c. Chased Gold Rings 
soldered, 26c. to 35c. Stone Rinars, 50c. Gold Eye Glass or 
Specs soldered, 35c, Eye Glass Spring, gold filled, 35c. Eye 
Glass Springs, gold, 50c. Riding Bows, nickel, 25c. Riding 
Bows, gold filled, 50c. Jewelry Roman colored, 25c. Eye Glass 
and Spec Lenses, 25c. to $1.00. 

All work sent by mail for repair returned the same day. 



Jeweler, Optician and Engraver, 

27 Main St., - - - - - Northampton, Mass. 



OFFICE OF 

B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Maae. 



^ti&iE LiFi.. 



Start in Basioess fof YoaFself. 



success ASSURED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
faihire of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. T^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 

wm IN mm ahd mmes. 

AGENT FOK THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



^^^^ ■ I ^W a w ill II MM 9em^m 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 



All suits made in my own work-shops. 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



fflassaehusetts flgr'iealtuFal College. 

AT THE 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



J 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-QFEHATIVE SOOIET!, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note IJooks, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALU. 



MANUFACTDEEK OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Bircb Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



RiYER Street, 



KOKTHAMPTON, MASS. 



E. B. HIGKINBOn, H. B. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours: 

S TO IS A.- Ji/C., l-SO TO 5 I>. 3yC. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

iiats, Caps, Gloves, Gents' \mM\ 

iEADY-MADE SUITS. 



•Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IRTJBBEIR 0-003DS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Jt^Bepairing done while you wait, 
2 PIKE NIX ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. E. FAICrE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITY STRMET, AMMERST, MASS. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call3 responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Estaisliment. 



A^&^^^ -A.g;^xit, 



H. Iv. OjECA^JVEJ »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

5^Ss:S-A.TISFA..CTIOI^^ a-X7-A.IlA.ISrTBBID. eJS^ 
OFFICE : 

Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 
ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



ingg's piitlG aoffltliis* 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



S4 and 86 Eranklin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIPS- 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. KELTON. 



. F. KELTON if CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



mmi mmmi Fiep m oystehs. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PJHOTOGRAPHiG STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



1©8 Main Steeet, 



NOKTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephens connection. 




Where 

W^andCoId .. 

prevail^ \\v'in\isf^phosen A^ith \ 




^r Consider— if yon canteepthewetont 
ff of your rifle it will not ruslnoifreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our lui'-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date Infor- 
Y, mation about powders,blaek and smoke- 
ji> less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
K/ load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
v- jacketed^ soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.: 
S, trajectories, velocities,penetrations. All 
fflf calibres 22 to45 ; how to care for arms and 
m , 1,000 other things, including many trade 
« J a secrets never before given to the public. 
^M A Free if j/ou will send Stamps for postage to 
M': Tlie Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



^fe^^^^»i»->"^-^^^J?^'^-^'»ii^il 



Tie M. N. Spear Book Store. 



ESTABLISHED FIFTY TEAKS. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

DE=:E3:0'T'0<3-IS^^:F'i3:EI3. 



Portrait and Group WorTi a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, ^2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A.MSEMST, MASS. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, "Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices, 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, GltOGI^S, JEWELHY 

riNE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 



RBPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LAKGB STOCK OF 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR EURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM Aio) HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



WE make:- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The Northampton M Store. 

li. R. CHEW^, Manager. 

CoR. Maik and Center Sts., Northampton. 



MASSJGRICULTUIiAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We •would inform the friends of the college, and the publlo 
generally, that we are prepared to supply- 
in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, addroBS 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



4TAI LOR> 

Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



■t > :the:: < { ■ 

ilftaeeacbusetts 

Haticultural 

College 



OFFERS 



1. A SHORT WINTER COXJBiSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A FOST G-RADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



^/VKCL 










[flpp. 18, 







•^ 



X. 



NO. 12. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH IN OS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



AnHa$i', Aa$$, 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A nevr and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S APER8T HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



jmm; 






F. PM©B). 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $j!.oo. 



REIPAI 



O. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELI 



GOLLEiE 
JEWELEe 



Skilled workme7i in our repair department. 

4®-EYES FITTED FEEE.«r 
By a graduate of De. Foster, Occulist. 




•^illS^P^ 



corjij.A.E,s 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



HARRY CLARK, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 18, 1900, 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901, Athletics. JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901, Library Notes. 

THOMAS CASEY, 1901, Alumni Notes. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902, Exchanges. 

CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, College Notes. ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 

CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside oi United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
CoUega Boarding Club, 



Prof. R. E. Smith. Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
J. C. Hall, Manager. 



Entered at the Past Office as secend-class mail matter. 



Cdl-tb rials. 



Those wha are accustomed to walk daily, with a 
feeling of safety, to and fro at the base of some 
growing building could hardly be more surprised to 
have some of the building material in the shape of a 
stick of timber or a hod of bricks fall upon their necks 
than were some in our midst when the present system 
of cuts fell upon their own. The dead have awak- 
ened, while some of those who lived only to be sick 
are running the risk of an early " finish." 



A GREAT deal has been said about taking college too 
seriously; about students becoming book worms, recluses 
and hermits; about the necessity of remembering that, 
college life does not consist in simply a struggle for 
knowledge. We grant that much may be said upon 
this side of the question ; and a man who overlooks 
the ameliorating influences of social life should have 
his attention called to what he is m.issing in his col- 
lege life. But there is another side of the question, 
and, as usual, there is something pertinent to be said 



upon it. If there were a more general seriousness 
throughout a student body there would be, oftentimes, 
less exaggerated seriousness in individual cases. Ex- 
tremes are excited by extremes. The crying need is 
not for less seriousness, but for more ; not a gloomy 
despondency, nor a melancholy pessimism, but a 
healthful earnestness. 



The man who thinks that he has exhausted the sub- 
ject of English literature because he has gone through 
Pancoast's text-book is laboring under the most delu- 
sive kind of fancy. Of course, presumably, no nian 
is so foolish as to think of such a thing, but many are 
so inattentive to the advantages of collateral reading 
that one is compelled to wonder what a college library 
is for. Here in our midst is a university for the ben 
efits of which we ought to count ourselves fortunate 
indeed. Growing up in the midst of opportunities and 
with a knowledge of how to improve them we let 
them slip away. If a man will acquaint himself with 
results of thought and inquiry which may be found 
upon the shelves of any well-supplied library, he will 
not have gained information alone, but also training 



134 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and insight that shall make him a more useful citizen 
in the world. The horizon of life will be expanded, 
and opportunities before undreamed of will present 
themselves and urge on to higher endeavor. Uni- 
versity training aims at these very ends. Hence if a 
library can in a large measure yield, through its use, 
these same results, what opportunities is a man miss- 
ing who fails to avail himself of its privileges ! 



Much might have been said against organizing a 
baseball team this spring. With military drill and 
track team, work our time is well filled up. If base- 
ball practice be added there is danger that something 
will be neglected. We ought by all means to con- 
tinue the good work begun in the Drill Hall during the 
winter past and make our track team a big success. 
Men ought not to neglect their work along these lines 
to idle away their time in baseball if they have no 
desire or hopes of gaining a place on the team. 
" Every achievement is a bird on the wing." We can- 
not hope to win in anything if wa scatter our energy 
over a large field of effort. Concentration is neces- 
sary to success. When we engage in too many things 
the tendency is for all of them to become burdensome. 
They lose their savor then. Interest immediately 
drops off. and disaster follows. We labor under pecu- 
liar disadvantages in successfully carrying out a.iy 
athletic enterprise. With no gate receipts to help us 
out financially, and with only a small number of stu- 
dents, mioney for running expenses is not forthcoming. 
Springtime, with the opportunity afforded for work, is 
not the most propitious season for collecting money. 
Bills which have been running during the winter must 
be paid up before the summer vacation begins. To 
earn the necessary money the fellows are obliged to 
work. Among these men are many who wish to 
compete for a position on one of the teams. They 
are either hindered from doing altogether, or else they 
are able to devote only a fraction of their time to the 
work. Such men are handicapped, and if they secure 
a position on the college team, the team is handi- 
capped to the extent that they lack in training. Com- 
petent and deserving men should be given their board. 
In no other way may the proficiency of the teams be 
so easily and cheaply promoted. Now that we 
have entered upon a campaign with a series of inter- 
esting games all arranged let us make it an aggres- 
sive one, and throw our zeal and energy into the fight 



to make it a winning one. A number of dismal, dis- 
heartening failures will do more to make the coming 
football season a failure than will anything else under 
heavens. Regularity in practice is essential. This 
much the teams owe the students; the students owe 
their loyal support. A grand tide of popular enthu- 
siasm will bring about and maintain this reciprocal 
attitude, and carry us on its swell triumphantly through 
another year. 



For several years past the students have supported 
a reading room with varying success, both from a 
financial point of view, and also from that of respect 
and appreciation on the part of the fellows toward the 
privilege that a reading room accorded them. About 
a year ago it was deemed necessary by those who had 
the matter in charge to give up the reading room 
because of lack of support. There were those who 
disliked to see such an excellent means for culture 
and profitable pastime thus abandoned. Among these 
were the members of the Advisory Board, who very 
soon with the aid of a portion of the student body 
undertook the management of the reading room, and 
successfully carried it on for the remainder of the 
spring term. The effort was clearly an attempt to 
restore order out of chaos, and it was successful. 
Some needed improvements were made. An attend- 
ant was constantly present to maintain order ; and 
once more those who wished for a quiet place fo- 
reading were able to enjoy that privilege. To those 
who sought the students' welfare, and put the reading 
room on its feet again our sincerest thanks are due. 
But the reading room at that time was not 
extending its greatest possible influence. Only 
those who contributed to its support were entitled 
to its use, and many who, from skepticism or 
other reasons, did not ally themselves with the 
new organization were deprived of its benefits. The 
situation was apparent to everyone. Hence many 
looked forward to the time when its management 
should again devolve upon the student body. Action to 
bring about that end was taken early in the following 
term, and as a result the student body organized itself 
into a reading room association by electing officers. 
Under their management the reading room was soon 
opened and an assessment of two dollars was levied 
to meet the expenses of the new association. For a 
statement of the receipts and expenditures for the past 



AGGIE LIFE. 



135 



seven months and of the present financial condition of 
the association the reader is referred to the itemized 
report found elsewhere in this issue. After an obser- 
vation of seven months we are pleased to say that we 
think the reading room is successful. The fellows, 
as a rule have been willing to pay the assessment, 
the only bone of contention being when they should 
pay, how many times they should be reminded of 
their obligation, and finally hovv many days of grace 
were accorded by law. The behavior in the reading 
room has been generally satisfactory, and when it 
seem.ed necessary to jog anyone's memory, or to make 
a reasonable request, the reminder was kindly taken 
and the request complied with. The success of the 
reading room so far has been due to the co-operation 
of the fellows with the officers whom they elected for 
its management. This has only to be maintained to 
make the reading room a grand success. In the 
future we hope it will never be neccessary to remind 
anybody that the periodicals in the reading room are 
public property and that they are not to be taken away 
till the proper time, when they will be given to those 
who purchased them from the association. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



The many friends of Robert H. Smith of the class 
of Ninety-two will be grieved to hear of his death at 
his home in Amherst on March twenty-fifth. 

Mr. Smith was born in Amherst and received his 
early education in the public schools of this town. 
After his graduation from this College he served five 
years as a chemist at the Hatch Experiment Station 
and in 1897 went to Germany and entered the Uni- 
versity of Gottingen with the intention of obtaining the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Failing in health, 
however, he was compelled to give up his plans and he 
returned to his home only a short time before his 
death. 

His many associates will remember him as a sin- 
cere friend, a faithful student and a loyal alumnus. 

At a recent meeting of the Phi Sigma Kappa fra- 
ternity the following resolutions were adopted : 

IN MEMORY OF 

ROBERT H. SMITH, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, '92, 

Deceased. 

Whereas, It has pleased tlie Allwise Father to remove from 
our midst our beloved friend and brother Robert H. Smith, 
and 



Whereas, Recognizing his many virtues and manly quali- 
ties, therefore, be it, 

Resolved : That we, the members of the Alpha Chapter of 
the Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity, deeply feeling our loss, do 
extend our heart-felt sympathy to the bereaved family in their 
affliction and be it further 

Resolved : That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
family of our departed brother, that a copy be Included in the 
Chapter records, and that they be published in the College 
paper and the Amherst Record. 

William P. Brooks. ^ Committee 
Philip H. Smith. Jr., > for the 
James W. Kellogg, j Chapter. 



FARMER GOODNOW OUTWITTED. 

'' None of your durned cow-stalkers are coming on 
my premises," thundered Farmer Goodnow, as he 
brought down his fist with a loud thump on the bench 
at which he was standing. 

Neighbor Jackwood who had called, as was his 
wont, to discuss some business matters with his neigh- 
bor, turned pale. 

A furious outburst of displeasure of which the opening 
sentence of this story was the passionate conclusion of 
which had been elicited by the untimely mention of 
cattle inspectors, whom Farmer Goodnow most cor- 
dially hated. It not infrequently happened that Good- 
now lost himself in a passion over the discussion of 
the state inspectors, for never did a man so thor- 
oughly hate an institution as did Goodnow hate that of 
the inspection of cattle, and the officers of the law, 
whose pleasant duty it was to discharge the wishes of 
thepeople.he had branded as "tuberculin cow-stalkers." 

Nothing up to this time had been able to shake the 
worthy farmer's conviction that cattle inspection was 
a farce. On the contrary every recurrence to the 
subject seemed to intensify his hatred, and to 
strengthen his determination to resist the enforcement 
of the law. Neighbor Jackwood in vain had tried to 
show to his neighbor the futility of opposing the law 
and had sought to overcome his antipathy to the 
public servants with the end in view of keeping his 
friend and neighbor out of the hands of justice. No 
argument would avail, however. A little exasperated 
by his neighbor's obstinacy he had made a final plea, 
but before getting half through,he had been met by so 
fierce and terrifying a rejoinder that his own anger left 
him as though swallowed up in the great gust of his 
friend's passionate temper and hatred. 

" Nothing meant; nothing meant I assure you," he 
hastened to gasp, " I only hoped to reconcile you to 



136 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the inspector's visit," he said as he turned on his heel 
and strode away. 

When half way across the fertile mowings that 
stretched between his own hooie and that of Farmer 
Goodnow, Neighbor Jackwood halted and under pre- 
tense of examining a stone wall near by, turned round 
and gazed back across the fields. He could discern 
the form of his neighbor still standing where he had 
left him. 

" A perfect devil when his blood is up," muttered 
the farmer as he pretended to replace a loosened 
stone. Turning to resume his way homeward he 
came face to face with a young man who had noise- 
lessly approached and now stood in the path. 

" Good evening, sir," said the young man, bowing 
respectfully, " May I ask if this is Neighbor Jackwood?" 

" That is my name." 

"I was led to infer as much," replied the stranger ; 
" 1 have just called at your home and they told me 
that you were at your neighbor's. I set out at once 
hoping to reach there before you left, and to kill two 
birds with one stone. My name is Spooner. I have 
called to inspect your cattle, and would like to do so 
to-morrow if you will find it convenient." 

" Well, I guess you may count your star a lucky 
one, young man," replied Neighbor Jackwood, " your 
life wouldn't be worth a sixpence had you popped such 
news into my friend's ear to-day. He's in a terrific 
mood and nearly took my head off for simply mention- 
ing the possibility of your visit. Lucky 1 left just as I 
did for more reasons than one." continued the farmer 
laughing. 

" But to be serious," he said, " I suspect you will 
have a good deal of trouble with that man before you 
succeed in inspecting his herd, I have argued with 
him against opposing the law, but in vain. 

" Oh. 1 guess I can bring him round all right," 
replied the stranger, " Was it he that you likened to 
the devil, may 1 ask ?" 

" The same, and the evil one incarnate is John 
Goodnow when he gets into a passion." 

" ' We cannot call her winds and waters, sighs and 
tears ; they are greater storms and tempests than 
almanacs can report.' " 

" By George ! You hit the nail on the head that 
time," replied the farmer, •' But 1 didn't mean Mrs. 
Goodnow you understand." 



" Yes, I understand," replied Spooner smiling at his 
companion's seriousness ; " it was the worthy Mr. 
Goodnow to whom you referred." 

'' Exactly ; 1 thought you made a slip on the word." 

" Let us retrace our steps and see if we can't pac- 
ify our friend," said Spooner, who was inclined to 
make light of the farmer's characterization of his 
neighbor, and moreover, was anxious to have the 
unpleasant duty done with. 

" Now my young friend," said Farmer Jackwood 
with a seriousness that did not fail to impress his 
companion, and, at the same time laying his hand on 
the young stranger's shoulder, " you take my advice 
and leave Goodnow alone till he's in a calmer mood. 
Come home to supper with me, and to-morrow, per- 
haps, we can draw up some plan by which to get round 
the matter." 

Spooner, on whom the farmer's serious manner 
had not been lost, kindly accepted this invitation, and 
both continued their way toward the farmer's house. 

On reaching the farmer's house they entered a 
spacious dining room, where the sight of an appetiz- 
ing spread drove away from the minds of both all 
thought of the cranky farmer not a mile away. The 
meal was finished and the host and his guest were 
seated in the old fashioned sitting-room by the blazing 
fire, for it was in the early fall, before the subject of 
Goodnow and his antipathy entered the minds of 
either. 

" 1 had forgotten our friend," began Spooner, who 
was first to mention the subject, " the sight of your 
bountiful table banished all thoughts of him from my 
mind." 

" And so had I, my friend," replied the farmer ; " I 
seldom let anything of that kind spoil a meal for me, 
but now that it is finished perhaps we had best con- 
sider some plan of action for the morrow. Have you 
ever heard of Goodnow's mill privilege ? " 

" His what ? " 

"His mill privilege." 

" The very thing ! " exclaimed Spooner ; " do you 
know, it was only to-day that a friend of mine was 
saying that he would like to get a good mill site. Is 
there really anything in it ? Or is it merely a fancy of 
Goodnow's ? " 

" Oh, it is a good site without doubt, but I was goingto 
say that the subject is one of Goodnow's hobbies and — 



AGGIE LIFE, 



137 



" We might use it as a lever to pull him round," 
said Spooner, finishing the farmer's sentence for him. 
" Exactly. How did you guess it ?" 
" Well, I put two and two together. Here is a 
friend of mine who is anxious to secure a good mill 
site, and here is a man whom we must contrive to win 
over in some way, who has one that he wants to sell." 

" Capital ! " 
" I think we shall have no trouble in winning our point. 
I will engage to buy the mill privilege if it be a good 
one and then will offer to examine the farmer's herd 
free of charge, guaranteeing to make the matter right 
with the authorities." 

•' A capital plan, and one that ought to be success- 
ful." exclaimed the farmer enthusiastically, shaking 
the young man's hand, vigorously. 

Having agreed upon this course the two went to 
bed, Spooner having gladly accepted Neighbor Jack- 
wood's kindly extended invitation to remain for the 
night. 

Early on the morrow Jackwood and his guest 
set out for Goodnow's barn. They found the farmer 
mowing brush in one of the pastures near the house, 
it could never be said of John Goodnow that he was 
ever surly, and having gotten over his angry mood, ha 
greeted his neighbor in his usual cordial manner. 

"John, this is Mr. Spooner," said Neighbor Jack- 
wood, introducing his companion ; " he has called to 
look over your mill privilege." Farmer Goodnow was 
all attention at once. He dropped his scythe and 
cordially shook hands with both his visitors and invited 
them to the house. 

" Think of starting a grist or a cider mill ? " he 
inquired as they approached the dwelling, addressing 
Spooner. 

" I have a friend who contemplates something of 
the kind," Spooner replied. " I am simply acting as 
his agent." 

Reaching the house, Spooner and his friend were 
ushered into the sitting room. Opening a large secre- 
tary that stood against the wall, Goodnow drew forth 
some papers. " I have here the map of the land and 
the deed conveying the same to me." said the farmer 
turning and laying some documents on the table. 
" We had best get some idea of the size and shape of 
the piece of land and then we'll go down and have a 
look at it," 



Spooner drew his chair to the table while Goodnow 
spread the map out before them. 

For an hour the farmer eloquently dwelt upon the 
advantages and merits of his privilege, Spooner being 
the while a deeply interested listener, taking care, too, 
to work his host to the highest point of enthusiasm by 
a skillful question now and then. 

At the close of the hour the farmer paused and 
folded the papers. " Perhaps we better run down and 
look over the site now, we have just about time enough 
before dinner," he said. 

They set out at once accompanied by Neighbor 
Jackwood. Spooner had been pleased with the far- 
mer's description and upon arriving on the ground he 
was fully convinced that the privilege was just what 
his friend wanted. 

"Farmer Goodnow," said Spooner, " 1 think I can 
make a deal with you if the price is satisfactory, for 
this site seems admirably adapted for a grist mill." 

" I thought you would be pleased with it," Goodnow 
replied ; •' and now if you will take dinner with me, I 
shall be pleased to talk over the money side of the 
question." 

They returned to the house and were soon seated 
at the farmer's well supplied table. 

" Now, as I said," Spooner began ; " I am merely 
acting as agent for my friend and cannot make any 
definite arrangements till I have consulted with him 
and probably he will wish to look the ground over for 
himself before purchasing. However I should like to 
learn your price and terms." 

" Well, 1 have estimated that the property is worth 
seventy-five hundred, anyway. I should like to talk 
over the matter with him at that price." 

" That seems reasonable to me and I have no doubt 
that we can make a satisfactory deal," Spooner 
replied as they rose from the table. " I will call again 
to-morrow and bring my friend with me and we will 
decide upon the matter." 

Spooner and Neighbor Jackwood prepared to leave. 
Goodnow saw them off with a cordial invitation to come 
prepared to accept of his hospitality on the morrow. 

'• Well," said Jackwood when they were out of 
hearing. " why didn't you speak out? " 

" I wish to wait till my friend has driven the bar- 
gain first. 1 don't believe we will have any trouble 
with him." 

" Not if I read the signs correctly," said the farmer 
laughing and rubbing his hands in satisfaction. 

LTobe concluded.] 



138 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ers^. 



A DAY IN WINTER. 

The sumach's long, ungainly arms, 
And in the fields the birches white, 

And many an old and gnarly shape 
On some far-off and hazy height, 

And pines and cedars here and there. 

With naked bushes everywhere, 

Afford a panoramic view 

That Summer never gives to you. 

The murmuring brook, the waterfall. 

The cascade's white and glimm'ring sheen. 
Dispel the dull monotony 

And lend enchantment to the scene ; 
And o'er the snowy meadows drear 
A sullen roar echoes clear, 
A deep reverberating tone. 
The freezing icepack's mournful groan. 

The woods are dead, no life is there, 

Except perhaps in yonder tree 
A crow, or in the underbrush 

A bluejay or a chickadee ; 
The low'ring sky foretells a storm. 
And trailing shadows 'gin to form 
Across the pastures cold and gray 
As slowly steals the light away. 



SONNET. 

What faction shall aspire to control. 

And shall believe its rule alone is best ? 

Let strife and party feeling be suppressed. 

No more to rise ; let every earnest soul 

Inscribe his name in full upon the roll 

Of those who seek the common good ; the rest 

May strive, but cannot long withstand the test 

That such a course imposes on the whole. 

Yes, sacrifice if need be, but resist 

The impositions of a selfish few. 

Vow never to have private ends in view 

Alone, but stand on higher ground ; engrave 

Your name thereon ; in spite of all persist 

In never being to yourself ignoble slave. 



TO THE BLUEBIRD. 

O, harbinger of sunny Spring, 
Of springing buds and flowers, 

Of skies as blue as are your wings, 
Of sunny April showers. 

When borne upon the chilling wind 
It comes from tree and stubble, 

I love to hear your thrilling note, 
Your sweet a,nd plaintive warble. 



The orchards soon will be in bloom, 
And winds their fragrance blowing, 

Shall waft the odor far and near. 
O'er every field and mowing. 

And soon across the fields we'll hear, 
The golden flicker hammer. 

And by the brook, the robins call, 
The first sweet note of Summer. 

To thee, thou harbinger of Spring, 
The naked woodland bowers 

Are giving joyful welcoming 

For promised leaves and flowers. 

We greet thee, too, yon azure bird. 
Thou promise of the pleasures. 

Which Spring and Summer bring to us 
With all their golden treasures. 



Th^ /Hirror. 



A mirror is a most useful thing. Rich and poor 
alike find consolation in its companionship. Young 
and old take more or less delight in gazing into its sym- 
pathetic face. Therein the comely maid may find 
the smile that best sets off her shining teeth. With it in 
view the love-sick lad may best arrange the love 
lock in his hair before he makes his evening call. 
Old maids and matrons of uncertain years rejoice 
when this kind friend can say with truth that no more 
gray hairs can be found among the lonely few that 
still adorn the aged head than yesterday were found 
there. 

How much kindlier is the expression on their faces 
when they are assurred that no trace remains of the 
march of another day of time 1 Indeed, they are 
younger than they were the day before, for then one 
of those indications of declining years had been de- 
tected, and the discovery had thrown a gloom across 
the pathway of their simple life. But to-day there is 
no gloom, but joy and sunshine instead, and among 
the furrows of the cheek is here and there a dimple 
to tell of other and more youthful days. 

The old men, too, will throw their pictures on the 
wall, and will shake their fists thereat, exclaiming : 
"How now, old sojer, good for a dozen more," and 
then will wheel about, and throwing their shoulders 
back will march out of the house, and up the street, 
feeling ten years younger. And so we might con- 
tinue to multiply the pictures. N. B. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



139 



Said I to myself, one day, — "High and noble as is 
the mission of the mirror in bringing happiness to all, 
in securing that one thing alone, its destiny is hot 
fulfilled. Its business is reflection. To reflect wisely 
is to view the sombre as well as well as the brighter 
side of life : to view both sides of life. "Now," said I, 
for I dearly love soliloquy, " reflection is something in 
which we seldom indulge here at Aggie except on 
some event like the Military Prom, or perchance just 
before an evening call." Now nobody wishes to find 
fault with the reflections either of mind or of mirror 
on such an occasion. They are private matters. 
"But," said I, "highly gratifying as such reflections 
must be, I wonder if these people always take a satis- 
factory picture." 

An idea — one of very few — suddenly occurred to 
me, and I determined to try an experiment. Accord- 
ingly, the following noon at dinner-time, I put a huge 
mirror under my arm, and headed for the "hash- 
house." Everybody stared and gaped as I marched 
by. Gaining access to the mess-room before the 
crowd, I hung the glass on the wall at the head of the 
table and seated myself so that I could gaze into it. 
The door was soon opened and the gang tumbled in 
and made a bolt for the tables. 

Now was my chance. As one man in a sweater 
held aloft a platter of steaming meat, while another 
waited with carving knife, ready to attack it as soon as 
it was put down ; as another stood with gravy bowl in 
one hand and potatoes in the other, while his dis- 
appointed mess-mate seized a chunk of cake in lieu 
of what his friend had grabbed before he had the 
chance to do so; as disordered pates bumped and plates 
rang in the eagarness of all to get the first slice of 
meat, and just as the atmosphere had gotted beauti- 
fully blue, and fritters and slices of bread were flying 
thick and fast, I yelled, "Halt, look there," pointing at 
the same time to the vivid picture in the mirror. 
Everybody came to attention and gazed ; then every- 
body sat down. A strange silence ensued. Then one 
carved the meat, and all passed their plates in turn, 
and the meal proceeded. 

Yes, they were mad, but as it could not have been 
at me, it must have been at the picture. So I con- 
cluded that a few, at least, did not always take a grati- 
fying picture. 



The wonder to me was not that they were angry, 
but that the mirror, from very mortification, was not 
shattered into fragments. 



THE READING ROOM. 

The retiring officers of the M. A. C. Reading Room 
association submit the following statement of the 
present financial condition of the association ; of the 
receipts and expenditures during their term of office 
beginning September 7, 1899, and ending March 22, 
1900 ; and of other matters connected with the man- 
agement of the reading room. 

Early in the fall a telephone was leased and hung 
in the reading room for the use of the students. Two 
long tables were placed on the west side of the room, 
the expense of which was borne by the college. The 
artificial light was improved upon by the re-arrange- 
ment of the electric lamps and by the addition of 
others. During the winter term two photographs, one 
of the track team and one of the football team, were 
hung on the eastern wall. 

We would recommend that the hanging of the pic- 
tures of college teams in the reading room be made a 
custom, although the pictures need not necessarily be 
confined to those of college teams. The addition of 
any appropriate ornament of this kind helps greatly to 
increase the respect for the room. 

The following periodicals have been on file : 

Amherst Record, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Bos- 
ton Transcript, Springfield Republican, Worcester Tele- 
gram, New York Herald, New York Times, New Eng- 
land Farmer, The Woman's Journal, The Rural New 
Yorker, The Massachusetts Ploughman, Puck, Judge, 
Life, Harper's Weekly, Leslie's Weekly, Outlook, Public 
Opinion, Munsefs, McClure's, Harper's, Century, 
Scribner's, Metropolitan, Argosy, Black Cat, Review of 
Reviews, Outing, Youth's Companion. 

RECEIPTS. 

Assessments, ■ $189.50 

Sale of periodicals, 15.25 



Total, 

EXPENSES. 

Sub. periodicals, 

M. D. Gold, settlement of old acct.. 

Distributing mail. 

On acct. of tolls. 

Telephone service, 


$204.75 

$71.00 

46.17 

21.50 

1.00 

17.88 



I40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Sub. Berkshire Courier, old acct., 


7.50 


" Brown Brunonian, 


2.50 


" Amherst Record. 


1.75 


Record book, 


.25 


Receipt books. 


1.50 


Stamp and pad, 


1.40 


Four wooden stools, 


3.00 


Paper files, 


2.84 


Hamper, 


2.00 


Postage, 


.51 


Miscellaneous, 


.08 




$180.88 


On hand, 


23.87 



Total, $204.75 

Liabilities, (none) 

Assets, (cash) $23.87 

(uncollected) $37.53 

Uncollected assets slightly in excess due to men 
leaving college. 

Clarence E. Gordon, Treasurer, 
M. A. C, R. R. Assn. 
March 24, 1900. 
Approved, 

P. B. Hasbrouck, 
H. T. Fernald. 



^olle^f ^ot^S- 



— A chemical trip is in the air. 

— E. Wollheim, 1903, has left College. 

— Time waits for no man. Man waits for — spring. 

— The museum of Zoology will be open to visitors 
at 4-50 in the afternoon, excepting Sundays. 

— Professor F. S. Cooley recently addressed a 
dairy institute gathering in Springfield; subject, " The 
production and care of market milk." 

— Captain John Anderson attended the annual ban- 
quet of Company I, 2nd Mass. Regiment, at North- 
ampton, Wednesday evening, March 28th, 1900. 

— Now that the weather is permissible the battal- 
ion is taking up drill in those formations which the 
cramped quarters of the drill hall would not permit. 

— The Flint Six.who will represent the Junior class 
at Commencement, have been announced by Profes- 
sor Mills as follows: G. R. Bridgeforth, T. F. Cooke, 
E. S. Gamwell, N. J, Hunting, W. C, Dickerman, A. 
Q, Wilson, 



— Captain Edmund Boltwood. who has recently re- 
turned from the Philippines, has presented to the Col- 
lege a number of relics which he brought with him. 

— H. L. Crane, A. F. Frost, and E. K. Atkins, 
with Professor S. T. Maynard, ex-officio, have been 
chosen by the Senior class as a committee to look 
after the flower-bed. 

— The Senior class has elected the following offi- 
cers for the coming term : President, G. F, Parmen- 
ter; vice-president, A. W. Morrill; secretary and 
treasurer, E. T. Hull. 

— The Y. M. C. A. has organized for the coming 
year as follows : President, G. R. Bridgeforth ; vice- 
president, A. L. Dacy ; corresponding secretary, N. 
J. Hunting; treasurer, T. M. Carpenter. 

— The following officers have been chosen by the 
Junior class to serve for the coming term : President, 
E. S. Gamwell ; vice-president, E. L. Macomber ; 
secretary and treasurer, *J. H. Chickering. 

— Two breech-loading cannon have been shipped 
from Watervleit arsenal, and are on the way to the 
College, The pieces, which are of improved pattern 
and of modern construction, have been secured by 
Captain Anderson for the use of the cadets in artillery 
practice. 

— The reading-room management has organized as 
follows : President, C. E. Gordon ; vice-president, 
H.A.Paul; secretary and treasurer, - C. T. Leslie; 
directors, J. H. Chickering, A. L. Dacy, H. L. 
Knight. C. A. Tinker, W. W. Peebles. 

— The Sophomore class has elected the following 
officers: President, J. C. Hall; vice-president, J. M. 
Dellea ; secretary and treasurer, H. A. Paul ; ser- 
geant-at-arms, M. A. Blake ; baseball captain, W. Z. 
Chase ; track team captain, L. C. Claflin. 

— On Friday, April 6th, the Junior class were 
excused from exercises during the morning, the fore- 
noon being spent in looking over some of the local in- 
dustries. With Dr. Wellington the class first visited 
the gas works where the process for the manufacture 
of illuminating gas was studied. The next point of 
interest was the electric light station. Here they 
studied the principle of the dynamo, and other electri- 
cal machines which Mr. Wallace kindly explained. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



141 



A "PROCLAMATION." 

There is given herewith to every student in the 
College the privilege of absenting himself from a pre- 
scribed number of class exercises which he has been 
required to attend hitherto. 

At the beginning of the College term every instruc- 
tor shall announce to his class the number of exer- 
cises from which its members are allO'Ved to be ab- 
sent during the term. This number shall be ten per 
cent, of the entire number of class exercises ; atten- 
dance at all of these may be required. 

Whenever for any cause, except a request of the 
athletic board, a student " cuts over " the number of 
absences allowed, he will be conditioned in the sub- 
ject which he has " cut " and will be required to do 
extra work at the time when conditions in term 
work are made up ; the amount and quality of 
this work will be left to the discretion of the instruc- 
tor. In the record of absences two tardy marks shall 
be considered as equivalent to one absence. 

If after the first " cut over," a student be absent he 
may offer to his instructor an excuse therefor, which 
excuse must be in writing and be signed by the stu- 
dent. The absence and the excuse, if offered, shall 
be reported to the instructors of the class to which 
the student belongs. These instructors shall meet at 
a stated hour once a month. They shall be organ- 
ized by the choice of a President and a Secretary.who 
who shall keep a careful record of all votes passed at 
these meetings. 

If the excuse for absence reported to the instruc- 
tors be accepted by a unanimous vote, their secretary 
shall report the same to the student and no further 
action will be required. If it be not accepted, or if 
the student fail to present an excuse the case shall be 
reported to the Faculty for action. 

It shall be the duty of the athletic board to post, at 
least one day before absence is desired, an official 
list of those who are to be absent at the request of the 
board, together with the day or days and the hours 
of each absence. The students thus posted will be 
excused and the privilege of absence shall not be 
granted to a student whose name is not thus posted. 

The privilege of absence hereby granted shall not 
extend to examinations. 

All rules pertaining to absences or excuses from 



class exercises heretofore adopted by the Faculty are 
hereby rescinded. 

(Signed) C. S. Walker. 
Secretary of the Faculty. 
Passed April 11, 1900. 



1^'r. 



The prospect for a successful baseball season is, at 
the present time, very encouraging. A number of 
very good games have been secured. A goodly number 
of men have presented themselves as candidates, and 
the attitude of the student body, while it cannot be 
called enthusiastic, is at least encouraging. It is 
unfortunate that the first two of our games should be 
spoiled, the first by the weather, and the second by 
some fault in the arrangements, but this should not 
interfere with our interest or, our subscriptons. 

It is impossible as yet to predict the make-up of the 
team but most of the positions are sure. Bodfish is 
sure in the pitcher's box and will probably be relieved 
by Bowler. Cook and Barry are both trying for 
catcher and the choice is as yet very doubtful. Captain 
Graves is playing his usual game at first and will prob- 
ably hold that place through the season. Halligan is 
sure at second, O'Hearn is the only candidate for 
third and Paul seems capable of retaining short. In 
the field there is a good bit of competition; Macomber, 
Henry, Gates, Pierson, Morrill and Bowler being the 
best men. 

At present coach Breckenridge h as" the men out for 
fielding and batting practice each day, and the men 
will undoubtedly be in fine stiape for the Vermont trip 
in May. 

The way in which the men are taking hold of the 
track athletics is very discouraging to all concerned. 
Captain Wilson has had no more than four new men 
report to him at any time. The meet with Worces- 
ter Tech will come in less than a month, giving the 
men but a very short time for training. We must 
wake up and either take hold of this thing and push it 
or else drop it altogether. We should always bear in 
mind that a failure in any branch of athletics means a 
black eye for every other branch. If we go into base- 
ball and make a failure of it, we will be left weakened 
for our fall work. In order to make anything in col- 
lege athletics a success we must first get the interest 



142 



AGGIE LIFE. 



aroused by a good schedule, and then money will come 
without trouble. In any case unless we who are not 
personally engagsd in the game to give it our hearty 
support, it must fall flat. 



BASE BALL. 

The following games have been arranged : 

April 13, 20, 27, practice games with Amherst. 

May 8, University of Norwich at Northfield. 

May 9, University of Vermont at Burlington. 

May 10, Vermont Academy at Saxton's River. 

May 16, Boston College at Amherst. 

May 18, Bowdoin college at Amherst. 

May 26, Storr's at Eagleville. 

May 30, Worcester Tech at Amherst. 

June 2, Trinity at Hartford. 

June 9, Bowdoin at Brunswick. 



E:^cham^e|. 



During the past few years, the exchanges of the 
Life have steadily increased in number, till our list 
now includes over a hundred. They come from all 
over the country, are sent out by all grades of educa- 
tional institutions and seem to be of varying degrees 
of excellence. Manifestly, a careful review of each 
is rendered impossible by the limits prescribed for the 
Exchange Department. The most that the editor can 
hope to do is to indicate from types picked from his 
list something of the progress and tendencies of this 
kind of journalism ; supplementing his comments 
wherever it is possible by placing the exchanges them- 
selves within reach of the student body. 

If we attempt to classify our exchanges according 
to their scope we find four groups : those representing 
the high schools and academies, and the college week- 
lies, semi-monthlies and monthlies. This may seem 
an arbitrary division, yet each sort is really distinct, 
and devoted to a work of its own. The college weekly 
aims to keep its readers in touch with the current 
events of the college world and is therefore chiefly a 
newspaper; the monthly on the other hand attempts 
little in the line of news, existing as a literary maga- 
zine ; while the semi-monthly is an attempt to com- 
bine both functions. 

Perhaps the class that receives the least amouut 
of credit for its work is the weekly. Owing to its 
limited opportunities for brilliant work, it receives in 



general but slight recognition. Yet we maintain that 
it is a powerful influence in college life, and as such it 
deserves consideration. 

One of our typical weeklies, and one which we 
judge to be quite influential as well, is the Amherst 
Student, now in its thirty-third year. As we should 
expect, the editorials are of a high order, well written, 
conservative in tone and tersely expressed. The 
same can be said of the other departments, college 
and alumni notes being especially good. In the mat- 
ter of advertisements the Student stands without a 
peer. Seventeen pages certainly speak eloquently for 
the energy of the business manager and his assistants. 
The Student attempts nothing along literary lines, 
leaving such work to the Literary Monthly, but in its 
chosen field it is eminently successful. 

The Tufts Weekly, issued in nev/spaper form, is also 
devoted to news alone, literary matters falling to the 
monthly Tuftonian. The Weekly is a thoroughly read- 
able sheet, well worthy of its position. We call 
especial attention to an article on " Athletics in 
Ancient Greece " in the issue for March 14. We 
should suppose however that it might easily be made 
more influential by enlarging and strengthening the 
editorial column, thus making it in greater measure the 
spokesman of the students. Might not some space 
also be well spared for an alumni column ? 

The Tech differs from the foregoing in its occasional 
lapses into purely literary matter, now and then favor- 
ing us with short sketches, themes and verse. What- 
ever does appear is certain to be of merit, and we 
only wish we could have more of such articles. As 
for the other departments the locals and alumni notes 
seem somewhat inadequate ; but we can realize that 
in an institution of the size of M. I. T. it is difficult to 
select items of general interest. By far the best 
feature of the Tech to our minds is the " Lounger." 

The /. S. C. Student from far-away Iowa is an unpre- 
tentious little sheet of which we may say that it is 
rather better than it looks. " The method of folding 
might be improved upon ; the refolding necessary is 
very inconvenient. Aside from this, which we think 
could easily be remedied by a change in form, there 
is much to commend. An especially timely article is 
" Be Sociable " in the issue of March 13. Aspirited 
editorial in the current number, April 10, on " Some 
Things that Touch Us Not " will apply to many col- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



143 



leges besides Iowa. The institutions where there " is a 
peace that is stagnation " are but too comnnon. From 
an article on ''Working the Prof." we quote : 

*' The ' working ' of a professor seems to be the 
finest accomplishment of some individuals. A man 
can obtain a maximum credit for a minimum amount 
of study, may consider himself a man of prominence, 
and he may be, but the presumption is that he is far 
less than he might be. The very fact that he gives 
another the impression that he is of some strength is 
an indication that he really possesses some of that 
strength." 

Noteworthy articles in our other exchanges are as 
follows : 

" Abner Willis " and "A Quintette of American 
Humorists," University Cynic ; " Onward Sweep of 
Humanity," Phoenix; " A Fish Story," Chauncey Hall 
Abstract; "Traitors" and "In Their Own Coin," 
E. H. S. Recorder; " New Mown Hay," H. S. Journal; 
" Homer's Advice " and an " Unconscious Influence," 
V. A. Life ; " Sam Snowdon's Dress Coat," Cherry and 
White; •' Story of an Untold Love," Graphic; " Story 
of Songs," Olympian. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



Two popular fiction works which have recently been 
placed in the Library are To Have and to Hold, by the 
author of Prisoners of Hope, and Red Pottage by 
Cholmondeley. 

Electro-horticulture, by George Hull. This is a 
complete summary of what has been done in the 
science of Electro Horticulture, containing accounts 
of many of the experiments which have been tried, 
figures relative to them, and the conclusions drawn 
from these experiments. But very few books have 
been published on this subject and this one is well 
worth the attention of any one interested in that part 
of the science of electricity. 

Plant Structures, by John M. Coulter is a complete 
volume on the subject of Morphology. It is not to be 
considered as a laboratory guide but for reading in 
connection with laboratory work. The language is 
easily understood, but very few technical terms being 
used, and the book contains a large number of illus- 
trations, gotten up principally by Dr. Otis W. Caldwell 
of Chicago University. 



North American Forests and Forestry, Their Rela- 
tions to the National Life of the American People, by 
Ernest Bruncken. The title fully explains the char- 
acter of the work but a few' words as to how the 
author treats the subject might not be out of place. 
He states that it is not written for the professional 
forester but for those who do not realize the import- 
ance of large forests in their relations to civilization. 
In reality it is a cry against the wasting of these valu- 
able stores which Nature, for millions of years, has 
been storing up for the uses of mankind. The author's 
love for Nature is easily seen in the following quota- 
tion : " Nature untouched by human hands is beauti- 
ful and grand, but grander and more beautiful is the 
life of man, with its constant striving for a more 
complete subjection of the forces and matter of Na- 
ture and the aspirations of the human spirit." 

Limestones and Marbles, by S. M. Burnham. This 
is not a treatise on geology, it simply presents the 
facts, gleaned from many different sources, concern- 
ing the history, formation and descriptions of lime- 
stones in such a way that their value to geology can 
readily be understood. Lime stones are often of great 
value in determining the age of soils as they are 
almost all of organic origin and often contain the fossil 
remains of extinct animals. The work contains a 
large number of beautiful colored illustrations which 
are of great value in understanding the descriptions. 

A Book of Whales, by T. E. Beddard. This subject 
is undoubtedly of more interest to the naturalist than 
to the general public, but it is complete in its own 
sphere, and exceedingly valuable for reference. 



umni. 



'83. — Dr. J. B. Lindsay, of the Department of 
Foods and Feeding, has returned from Saratoga 
Springs. The Doctor is much improved in health 
and hopes soon to resume his duties at the Station. 

'90. — Charles H. Jones of Burlington, Vt., was in 
town recently. He is chemist at the Vermont Ex- 
periment Station. 

•92. — F. J. Smith of the Bowker Chemical Co. is 
now in charge of the Insecticide Department. 
Address No. 46 Reid St., Elizabeth. New Jersey. 



144 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'92. — G. E. Taylor of Shelburne was in town 
recently. 

'94. — Claude M. Walker is about to publish an ele- 
mentary chennistry for High schools. He is assisted 
in this work by Professor F. A. Gooch of Yale. The 
book is being published by MacMillan & Co. and will 
soon be ready for the public. 

Ex-'94. — L. E. Goessmann who has been engaged 
in the fertilizer business for the past five years is act- 
ing as assistant chemist at the Hatch Experiment 
Station for April and May. 

'96. — Francis E. DeLuce was in Amherst recently. 

'97.— C. A. Peters, assistant in the Kent chemical 
laboratory at Yale, has received honors which are 
equivalent to honorary recognition from the Phi Beta 
Kappa in a classical college. Mr. Peters was a vis- 
itor at the college recently. 

Ex-v'97.— A.C.Brine is with the Mace MoultonCo., 
consulting engineers on bridge and all kinds of iron 
works. Their office is at Springfield, Mass. 

'98.— C. G. Clark spent a short time at the college 
recently. 



'98. — J. S. Eaton is studying law at the University 
of New York. Mr. Eaton pitched for the University 
of New York in a ball game against Yale at New 
Haven recently. 

'99. — B. H. Smith, who until recently was instructor 
in chemistry at the college, has entered upon his 
duties as assistant money-order clerk at the post-office 
Springfield, Mass. 

'99.— W. A. Hooker has entered the employ of 
Meekins, Packard & Wheat, Springfield, Mass., as 
assistant clerk in rug department. 

'99. — Howard E. Maynard, who is taking a course 
of study at Worcester Tech, recently spent a few days 
at the home of his father. Professor S. T. Maynard. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 




iiuiJiiiifiuyuauiiuiiiRiuii 



imnnnannnnfflBBj 



That is Equally Efficacious for 

Internal and External Use. 

Johnson's Anodyne Liniment ia the oldest, safest, most 
reliarble liniment on earth. It is made of pure vegetable 
ingredients, prepared with the utmost slcill and care, and 
it may be taken internally and given to children as safely 
as it may be used for rubbing the surface of inflamed por- 
tions of the body. It was originated In ISIO, and has 
been constantly in use since then for the relief and cure 
of inflammation, and all the many diseases which begin 
with inflammation. It has won highest praise from ath- 
letes, especially from golf players, for its value in 
strengthening, toning, invigorating the muscles and the 
cure of sprains, stiffness and soreness. It is a preventive 
of "golf arm." It is the first thing needed in all the acci- 
dents athletes are accustomed to. After a bicycle ride or 
any exercise, briskly rubbing the muscles with JOHN- 
SON'S Anodyne Liniment will double the value of the 
exercise. It keeps the muscles firm, the joints supple 
and the skin healthful. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Aro4;i7q 



has an unequalled record of nearly a Centary of Cures. 

It should be kept on hand for prompt treatment of colic, 
cramps, diarrhcea, cholera morbus, bites, bruises, burns, 
stings, chafing, chilblains, colds, coughs, croup, catarrh, 
bronchitis, la grippe, lameness, muscle soreness, and 
pain and inflammation in any part of the body. In two 
size bottles, 25 cents and 50 cents. The larger size is 
more economical, holding three of the smaller. 

I. S. JOHNSON & CO. 22 Custom House St., Boston, Mass. 

Write for a free copy of "Treatment for 
Diseases and Care of the Sick Room." 

n«iiminmn.ninu»H»u«wn..u,.w.......mnni.ni.niimnii»..n.; 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without charge, in the 

dentific Jimerican. 



A handsomely illustrated weekly. 



Largest cir- 
Terms, $3 a 



culation of any scientific journal 

year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN SCo.3«^«"'^""«'>' New York 

Branch Osace. 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Aggie Lit'E. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fi7ie Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Panta pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits •A.vc.pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style 



Keilogg's Block, Anilierst, Mass. 



Wc Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHINQ CO., 
134 Van Buren St. , Chlccf o. 



TEAOHERS WANTED! 



mm TEACHERS' BOEPIES OF PPlEIflGH. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pittsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New Yoik,- Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Cana<la. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WASHINGTON, D. C, oi< PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GA1 ES, D. D. S. 



E. N. BROWX, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS, 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Houks : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



M. A. C. Students desirous of first class work at reasonable 
prices will find the following list of interest. 

Mainsprings, $1.00, warranted one year. Cleaning, $1 to $2.50. 
Balance Staff, $1.50. 

JEWELRY AI^D OPTICAL WCRK. 

Plain Gold Rings soldered, 25c. to 35c. Chased Gold Rings 
soldered, 26c. to 35c. Stone Rings, 50c. Gold Eye Glass or 
Specs soldered, 35c. Eye Glass Spring, gold filled, 35c. Eye 
Glass Springs, gold, 50c. Riding Bows, nickel, 25c. Riding 
Bows, gold filled, 50c. Jewelry Roman colored, 25c. Eye Glass 
and Spec Lenses, 25c. to $1.00. 

All work sent by mail for repair returned the same day. 



Jeweler, Optician and Engraver, 



27 Main St., 



Northampton, Mass. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, MasB. 



AGGIE TulVh.. 



Start in Basiness for YoapseW. 



SUCCJSS8 A88UBED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



& RICi 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New Yokk City. 



J. H. TJROTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 

wm iH STOVES m wm. 

AGENT FOR THE CELEBKATED 

Gumey Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. BLD 

(Successor to W. W'. Huut) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, 



Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups, &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. F. CAMPION, 



I 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

1^° All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^^J 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehosetts flgpieultoFal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Perclieroii Horses and Souioi Slieep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amhbrst, Mass. 



AGGIE LlifS. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HAl-t-. 
MAKUFACTUREK OP 

Pineaijple, Lemon and German Tonic, Bircli Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



RIVEK STBEET, 



NOKTHAMPTON, MASS. 



E. B. siGKineaH, b. a. e. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hotjks: 
9 to 12 a.. ivc., 1-30 to 5 f. 1^/l. 



\l\ 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

, Gaps, GIflVfis, Gents' 

FINE RE&DY-IHADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Otjustoixi J^Iaiclo Olotlxijtig;. 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered wlien desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

lESTJBBEIR OOOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



t^lRepairing done while you tvait,,gsi 
2 VBOENIX ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AUITT HTMEET, AMBESST, MASS. 



KO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and niglit call3 responded to at residence, first door 
■west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-Operati¥e Steai Laundry* 

and Carpet Reaovatji Establisiimeat 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S^;BsS-A.TISF.A-aTI01Sr a-XJA.K,.A.3>TTEBI3. a-S^ 

Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



*Pertnilge'8 ptiletic Sotfltli 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Bancers. 

NE\N STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST fRlCES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



fS4 and 86 Franklin Street, - 



BOSTOir, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFK- 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. KELTON. 



•> 



DEALERS IN 



Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PflOLTRY, !E0ETfliLE8, FlSfl HP OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PdOTOGRAPHiG STUDiO. 

*oci«ty, Class and Group Work a Specialty, 
rrompt attsfntion given to students. 

A.. J. <som:ii:-<IvA.mm3, 

108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 




Consider —If yon can teep the -wet ont 
of your rifle it will not rustnotfreeze. Only 

t Marlin Repeaters | 

a have Solid Tops, shedding water like a ')'' 

fy duck's back. Ouv iy7-page book iinst out) __j 

V tells aU about them. Up-to-date infor- (Jr 

t". mation about po\vderg,black and smoke- ./ 

Si less-, proper sizes, Quantities, how to Jr 

Kl load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, w 

\ jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.; «! 

jK. trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All JJ 

f'' calibres 22 to 45; how to care for arms and (ft 

, 1,000 other things, including many trade j.^ 

- / » secrets never before given to the public, 'a, 

^MLfree if you will send stamps for postage to (i» 
M': The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



The ffl. N. Spear Book Store. 



established fiety years. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fi7ie li7ie of Slalionery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

:e=':e3:o'X'OC3-^s.^:e=he^s. 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Gahinets, $2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A.MJIJSR8T, MASS. 



Hmberst Ibcuse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDFIICK, Manaqbr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 

SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EL, D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. 



DEALER IN 



WJITGIIES, GliOG^S, JEWEIiHY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 



REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OB" 

EANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WAEE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AOT) HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



we: MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 



Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The Northampton M Store. 

X.. R. CHEW, Manager. 

Cor. Maik and Center Sts., Northampton. 



MASS.jlGRICULTUI[AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inlorm tlie friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited CLuantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, addresa 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



4TA I LP R. )^ 

Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty.. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



■ t > :the:: — r:^ 

/nbaeeacbusetts 

Haricultural 

College 



OFFEIR: 



1. A SHORT WINTER COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 




Way 2, 1900. 



Oollose. 




. X. 



NO. 13, 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH I NOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



A/AHa$T, Aa$$, 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A nevF and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Eoi little Cigars. 
Tvrenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



m 



I, 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $j.^o. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to $S-00. 



REIPAIRINO.^ 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



GOLLEgE 
JEWELER 



BEN 



OOLLEOE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair departm,ent. 

4®=-ETES FITTED FBEE.^9' 
By a graduate of Dr. Foster, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




.;:w^ 



COIjILi-A.K,S 



HARRY CLARK, 

UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AQQIE LIFE. 



\^r 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS., MAY 2, 1900. 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggih Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901, Athletics. JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901. Library Notes. 

THOMAS CASEY, 1901, Alumni Notes. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Exchanges. 

CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, College Notes. ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 

CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 

Terms: $1.00 per gear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o{ United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
J. H. Chickering Sec. 
Reading-Room, C. T. 



Athletic Association, 
Base-Ball Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 
Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
J. C. Hall, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



^dl'torlals. 



We are fortunate indeed if the green grass that so 
relieves the eye as we look about us over field and 
meadow can induce such healthful reflections as shall 
bring us more into sympathy with the natural beau- 
ties of our surroundings. When the goddess of spring 
has sprinkled the grass and flowers over the seared 
winter covering of mother earth we feel the joy of sim- 
ply being. Life is in itself a joy in spring time. If 
we are prone to philosophize instead of simply enjoy- 
ing our happy state perhaps the leaves of grass can 
suggest thoughts to us as grand and lofty as did they 
to a poet who was far more sympathetic than are we. 



In the constitution and by-laws of the athletic board 
among the general rules is the following article : 
" The wearing of the College monogram upon cap or 
sweater shall be considered a special privilege and re- 
stricted as follows : In baseball and football, men who 



have taken part in at least three games in the same 
season. In track athletics, men who have taken at 
least three points in a dual meet, or one point when 
more than two teams are engaged. Also managers 
and captains of baseball, football, and track teams by 
virtue of their office." The " M " was designed as a 
special privilege for those who have taken honors 
while representing the college, or for those who had 
done a certain amount of team work in college ath- 
letic contests. The monogram and the privilege of 
wearing it should be thensomethingfor which to strive. 
It should be recognized as a mark of service and 
should not be worn by anyone who has not fulfilled the 
necessary requirement that shall entitle him to wear 
it. If Tom, Dick and Harry, irrespective of distinc- 
tion won or service done are permitted to wear this 
mark of honor, pray where does its significance 
come in } That this is a just view none will deny. 
Let each man who has not earned the privilege of ap- 
pearing with the "M" remove the same from his 
blouse, till he has. The badge will not mean any- 
thing until it is appropriately worn. 



146 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The purposes of a college paper have been set 
forth in the columns of The Life at various times. 
The duty of each man in college v/ith respect to the 
paper has been dwelt upon time and again but appar- 
ently with no material results. The editors are forced 
to endure the lethargic attitude of the students and 
are left to get out the paper as best they may. So 
disinterested do many seem to be that they will not 
strive for a position on the board, and if hoping for 
election, they are content to let matters take their 
course, trusting meanwhile in other ways to accom- 
plish their ends. Now the purpose of requesting con- 
tributions, the merit of which shall determine a man's 
eligibility, is to find out those men who are interested 
in the paper's success and standing ; and who will 
make, by reason of their ability and willingness, the 
most efficient corps of editors. This will suggest it- 
self at once as both reasonable and just. To a paper 
that pretends to be, in any measure, of a literary char- 
acter such lethargy on the part of the students is par- 
ticularly injurious. More than this, it is very unchar- 
itable, to say the least, to load a board of editors with 
such a responsibility and then refuse to help them out, 
expecting the while that the paper will maintain a char- 
acter of uniform excellence. Did the board have 
nothing else to do but get out the paper, this might 
be done, but with manifold duties demanding time 
and energy such a thing should not be expected, 
and such a task should not be imposed. Apart 
from all these considerations the paper is, to a 
large degree, defeating its purpose when the students 
do not contribute to its columns ; for the paper is de- 
signed, in part, to furnish a means of training and an 
outlet for creative literary talent. One year from 
now will take place the election of a new board. Let 
those who are interested in maintaining a creditable 
paper begin to show their interest now by contributing 
regularly to The Life and when the proper time shall 
come, faithful and creditable work shall bring its own 
sufficient reward. 



If we will but scan the pages of history we shall find 
again and again recorded the adoption of what is 
known as an expedient. Expedients, considered in 
this connection, are but provisions to meet the exi- 
gencies that may arise at any time which call for im- 
mediate action and which will not allow of lengthy de- 



liberation. They are remedial in their nature and 
aim to restore order out of chaos. Systems of law 
sometimes find their origin in an hastily adopted ex- 
pedient if in it there may be found a principle that 
shall serve as a firm foundation for an enduring struct- 
ure of jurisprudence or of government. From a 
measure that by reason of the very circumstances 
that gave it birth must be more or less crude and im- 
perfect we should not expect too much ; we should 
not look forward to seeing every difficulty which it 
was designed to deal with at once surmounted. If it is 
accomplished only in part what its framers had hoped 
for, it had done something to earn for itself some rec- 
ognition of its worth. The college senate is by no 
means, when in perfect working order, of the nature 
of an expedient but in its, embryonic state it may par- 
take a good deal of that character. There is in many 
colleges a system of student government of which the 
Senate is a very important part. But before such a 
government as it now exists was organized there must 
needs have been a trial of a system out of which by 
modifications the present one has grown. The first trial 
probably had been occasioned by necessity. Hence 
the measure that was framed to meet the peculiar ex- 
igencies of the case may be very properly termed an 
expedient. When the difficulty had been tided over 
the act had suggested the advisability of establishing 
a permanent system of government founded upon the 
idea from which the expedient had sprung. No attitude 
is more commendable on the part of a student body 
than a determination to have of itself a controlling Influ- 
ence over itself. The day has long gone by when it was 
necessary to place all matters requiring control into the 
hands of the Faculty. There are a good many things 
v/hich that body, nowadays, is powerless to control. 
Since the passing away of those cast iron rules that 
characterized a past generation,the students in our col- 
leges are given many liberties which they may exer- 
cise at their own free will. Things take their course 
without any attempt at interference on the part of the 
Faculty .except in extreme cases. If the course be an 
evil one the disgrace of student conduct inevitably falls 
upon the institution, and seldom upon those at fault. 
Some rigid and disciplinary means should be adopted 
by the student body to keep in check those actions 
that reflect discredit upon itself. The presidents of 
the Junior and Sophomore classes should see to it that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



M7 



early action be taken to organize a fearless Senate 
for the coming fall. Our Senate during the past 
year has been severely criticized for the incomplete- 
ness of its work, but we have been too prone to expect 
too much of the first trial. Let us rather commend 
the effort, unsatisfactory in some respects though it 
may have been, and endeavor to fan into flame those 
embers that once shone so brightly on the path of duty 
we had ourselves outlined. Perhaps we may stir 
again the sentiment that shall lead to an wholesome 
system of student government. 



Th£RE are several points of view from which to 
consider the matter of college athletics, and the 
thoughts that come to mind in a thorough considera- 
tion of the subject are applicable to every institution 
of learning'in the land. A college builds, as it were, 
to a large extent upon its fame. In this respect it is 
not unlike a business corporation which seeks to ad- 
vance its interests by maintaining a standard of excel- 
lence in everything that it manufactures, and by ad- 
vertising itself to the fullest possible extent. A busi- 
ness house of to-day that will not employ those means 
that are upright and honorable to promote its interests 
will surely fall behind in trade and profits until it is 
forced out of business through nothing but its own 
conservatism and unwillingness to take up with what 
the occasion demands. Have athletics in our col- 
leges come to stay ? We do not know ; but every- 
thing points to a long period of life for the athletic de- 
partments in our educational institutions. People 
have come to recognize, if not their benefits then their 
power,and when a thing becomes a power it is some- 
thing to be reckoned with right speedily. The inevitable 
is irresistible. The time has come and now is when the 
growth of a college depends upon its fame and that 
in no small degree a fame in athletic prowess. The 
college as an official body should recognize this trut h. 
To this body the consideration of this subject becomes 
a matter of business, pure and simple, if the growth 
of the college is what is desired ; and nobody doubts 
that the interest of the college is in the heart of every- 
one connected with it. A very cursory analysis will 
show that the predominant sentiment that impells the 
students at Aggie, or at any other institution, to engage 
in athletics is the one that seeks the interest of the 
college. Considerations of self undoubtedly lead men 



to strive for a place on the teams, but this is com- 
mendable surely as it causes competition and there- 
fore strengthens the teams. These considerations, 
however, are lost sight of when the proposition to 
drop an athletic enterprise is brought up. The indig- 
nation and sorrow expressed at such a time are genu- 
ine and are evoked by no selfish thought of sacrificed 
personal emolument. Moreover, it is no selfish feel- 
ing that awakens that spirited enthusiasm which binds 
us all as one man, and gives such an impetus to hard 
work and noble achievement in athletics. It is an 
wholesome, commendable attitude on the part of the 
student body that seeks the welfare and the good 
name of the college, and if it is such, then substantial 
support ought not to be refused. Faith in the institu- 
tion is not enough ; hearty support and co-operation 
all along the line are necessary. It is presenting no 
new fact to the world when we give publication to the 
assertion that we have a hard struggle in getting 
rhoney for athletics. Everybody knows it, and it is a 
business proposition when we ask for that which we 
need — and which we would not ask for if we did not 
need it — when the interest of the college is at stake. 
This solicitation is made with the firm conviction that 
when sacrifice must be made to maintain the position 
of the college the students should not be compelled to 
bear unassisted the financial part of the responsi- 
bility. Those who dislike athletics must conquer their 
prejudice, recognize the inevitable, and throw 
aside their conservatism. We have received only 
recently a fair business proposition. It was wise, ex- 
pedient, and just. Here is another no less business- 
like. How shall this be received? One thing is true, 
athletics will never be banished from a college so 
long as they remain a potent factor in promoting the 
interests of ihe college in any way. If a college de- 
pends upon its alumni for its strength how can their 
interest be maintained in any one way so easily as by 
giving them a college to be proud of. The sympathy 
which our graduates have for athletic efforts must be 
reckoned with. Every loyal man will point with 
pride at every victory we may achieve upon the grid- 
iron or upon the diamond. Now, money is annually 
spent to advertise in the college paper But here is 
a force to carry our name far and wide, and one more 
powerful to gain recognition than is our paper, that is 
wholly passed by. Where could the small sum nee- 



148 



AGGIE LIFE. 



essary be better invested ? Meanwhile the students 
have their side of the question which needs consider- 
ation. They should never think of giving up athletics 
even if to maintain them must be at a sacrifice. We 
are interested in seeing M. A. C. gain the distinction 
which should be hers. We must not see our Alma 
Mater fossilize because we are unwilling to sacrifice 
for it. Such selfishness as well impede or prevent 
our carrying out what is clearly for the best interests 
of the college and for ourselves should wholly belie 
our characters. Nor can we afford to lose such a 
binding and ennobling influence as that exerted by the 
spirit of unity and patriotism which athletics give. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

George Crowell Clarke. 

George Crowell Clarke was born in Topsfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, August 29, 1879. When eight years old 
he united with the Methodist church. His father be- 
ing called by his duties as clergyman in the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church from place to place, George's 
boyhood and early youth was spent in several towns. 
His early schooling was obtained in the public schools 
of Conway, Chicopeeand Maiden. In the fall of 1897 
he entered the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
from which he would have been graduated in 1901. 

April 1 1 he returned to his home in Winthrop,Mass. 
to help his parents in the moving of their household 
goods to Lowell. On the following Sunday he was 
taken ill and a physician was called. There seemed 
to be at first only a slight indication of tonsilitis, but 
on Monday he grew rapidly worse and symptoms of 
the dread diphtheria appeared. Everything which 
the best medical skill and constant loving care could 
do were done, but without avail. He passed away on 
Wednesday, April 18, having been away from College 
just a week. He was buried in the family lot in 
North Grafton. 

His parents are left to mourn the loss of a dutiful 
and loving son ; his classmates that of a true brother, 
a hard and faithful worker, an upright young man, 
kind and a constant friend. 

The local Chapter of the Q. T. V. fraternity, of 
which he was a member, adopted the following 
resolutions : 

IN MEMORY OF 

GEORGE CROWELL CLARKE, 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

1901, DECEASED. 

Whereas, It has seemed wise in our Heavenly Father's 

sight to remove from our midst our beloved brother, George 

Crowell Clarke and 



Whereas, Recognizing his many virtues and manly quali- 
ties, and realizing that in him we have lost a faithful friend 
and worthy brother, be it therefore 

Resolved, That we, the Amherst Chapter Q. T. V. Frater- 
nity, do extend our heartfelt sympathy to the afflicted family, 
and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, a copy be inscribed in the archives of our 
fraternity, and that a copy be sent to the Aggie Life for pub- 
lication. 



F. Guy Stanley, 
J. Harris Todd, 
D. N. West. 



Committee 

for the 

Chapter. 



IN MEMORY OF 

GEORGE CROWELL CLARKE, 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

1901, DECEASED. 

Whereas, it has pleased Him who controlleth all things 
wisely to take from us our much beloved friend and class- 
mate, George Crowell Clarke and 

Whereas, Remembering his many manly qualities, his over- 
flowing good nature, his ready smile, and his ever cheerful 
word, therefore be it 

Resolved, That we, his former comrades, the members of 
the Class of Nineteen Hundred and One of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, united with a bond of abiding fel- 
logship whose ties death alone can break do extend their 
heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family in this hour of 
affliction, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
family of our departed brother, that they be transcribed upon 
the records of the class, and that they be published in the 
college paper and in the Amherst Record. 

Jas. H. Chickering, ^ Committee 
J. Harris Todd, > for the 

Clarence E. Gordon. ) Class. 



FARMER GOODNOW OUTWITTED. 

(Continued.) 

On the day following his visit to the farmer 
Spooner called again at Goodnow's home in company 
with his friend, Silas Winter, the prospective pur- 
chaser of the farmer's mill privilege. 

" Now, remember," said Spooner, as they drove 
into~the yard, " always to address me as your agent. 
The farmer is a wide-awake man and must not be 
given any cause for suspicion as to my intentions or 
the whole thing will fall through.'.' 

Spooner had told his companion of his plan to cir- 
cumvent the farmer by inspecting his herd in the 
guise of a friend instead of in his official capacity as 
inspector for the State. Winter, with whom the plan 
found ready support, was keenly alive to the possibil- 
ity of fun that the affair offered, and wishing above all 
to get control of the property that he had come to 



AGGIE LIFE, 



149 



purchase if it should please him, he entered zealously 
into his friend's plans. 

" You may count on me," he replied ; " of course I 
hope that the whole thing comes off without any 
trouble, for according to your description of our friend 
he must be a ferocious customer when he is angry. 
There is a spice of danger in it, however, which I 
relish." 

The friends shook hands as the carriage brought up 
at the door. 

The farmer had evidently been expecting their visit. 
He appeared immediately, invited them to alight, and 
having disposed of the team in a shed near by, accom- 
panied them into the house. 

Goodnow's appearance attracted Spooner's atten- 
tion a little more strongly than it had done before. 
He was more carefully dressed, and wore in place of 
the shabby clothes in which he worked on the farm, a 
suit of black, an old-fashioned low-cut vest,^a high 
collar of the style so familiar in the portraits of a half 
a century ago, and a black string cravat at the wide 
chasm at the throat. His grizzly hair was carefully 
combed away from a forehead which was rather low, 
but which indicated, with the steel gray eyes that 
looked out from beneath the shaggy eyebrows.no small 
strength of mind. The face was strong in its expres- 
sion. The lower jaw was large and the thin, firmly 
compressed lips betokened strength of will and purpose. 

" No mean antagonist to meet on equal terms," 
thought Winter, and catching Spooner's eye he gave 
his friend an expressive look. 

The visitors were ushered into the spacious sitting- 
room when Spooner introduced his friend. The map 
and deed of the land were again taken from the old 
secretary, where they had been placed after the inter- 
view with Spooner, and spread upon the table. The 
guests having drawn their chairs to the table the far- 
mer went over the same ground with Winter that he 
had explained to Spooner the day before. The 
farmer's gray eye glistened as he fondly dwelt upon 
the peculiar merits of his mill site while Winter 
employed tactics similar to those which Spooner had 
used to draw him out. 

It took about an hour for Goodnow to exhaust the 
subject and fully explain the lay of the land. Having 
carefully gone over every point, laying particular stress 
upon those peculiar advantages that according to his 



conception could be found in no other place, he care- 
fully folded the papers and once more placed them 
away in his desk. 

'• Now," said he, " if you are thinking of buying this 
property, the only proper way to go about the mat- 
ter is to carefully see it for yourself, so if you will 
come with me we will inspect the genuine thing. The 
map of the land is one thing, while the land is very 
likely to be another." 

Winter had striven to be an interested listener dur- 
ing the farmer's explanation, but he had likewise been 
very careful not to commit himself in one way or the 
other about the matter of purchasing. The shrewd 
farmer had noted this, and had closed up his descrip- 
tion a little sooner than he would otherwise have done. 
Spooner, too, had been puzzled in that his friend had 
not shown more eagerness to purchase. But Win- 
ter, shrewder than his friend, had sounded the farmer's 
nature more carefully than Spooner had done it. 
" Here is a man of moods," he thought, " quick to 
respond to circumstances. He cannot be worked up 
to a pitch of enthusiasm ; he must be carried by 
storm. If the property suits me I will close the bar- 
gain in a jiff before he hardly realizes my intention. 
It will take him off his feet the more quickly because 
he's in the dumps now at my apparent indifference." 

As they left the house Spooner gave his companion 
a nudge, but Winter gave him so significant a look in 
response that the former's fears were dispelled at 
once. They walked rapidly and soon reached their 
destination. Winter had almost settled the matter in 
his own rnind, and one look fully decided him. 

" I will take it," he said. 

Apparently the farmer did not hear him. 

" Before we go any farther," said Goodnow, " let 
me point out some of the things we were talking over 
at the house. You see — " 

" If it be satisfactory to you I shall be pleased to 
close the bargain at once," broke in Winter, " I am 
satisfied that the land is just what I want if we can 
make the price agreeable." 

As Winter had expected the farmer's face lighted 
up in an instant. His whole manner indicated the 
keenest pleasure. " Certainly," he replied, " I shall 
be only too happy to do so, but you are the strangest 
man to deal with that I've met for many a day. You 
gave me no encouragement whatever while we were 



15° 



AGGIE LIFE. 



looking over the papers, but now you are willing to pur- 
chase without even examining the ground." 

" Well, my friend," said Winter, " I will say that I 
have the greatest confidence in your judgment as 
well as that of my friend and agent, Mr. Spooner, who 
has examined the ground and pronounced it to be just 
what I want. Now, how much do you ask ? " 

" 1 believe I told Mr. Spooner that I considered it 
worth about seventy-five hundred," replied Goodnow, 
looking at Winter in a way that might have meant he 
was rather doubtful about his own mind, however. 

" Don't you think that is pretty steep ? " said Win- 
ter to Spooner, at the same time giving him a wink. 

Spooner understood. " No," he replied, " I think 
that is reasonable. The property is worth that to you." 
The last statement was the absolute truth. 

"Well, I don't know," said Winter, " it seems to 
me that the price is a little high but I am willing to 
pay what the thing is worth." 

" What do you consider it to be worth, Mr. Winter?" 
asked the farmer, anxious to settle that on which he 
had set his heart. 

Winter thought for a moment as though carefully 
pondering the matter. " I will give you seven thous- 
and," he finally said, " half cash down, the rest in a 
note for sixty days." 

" The land is yours," replied the farmer, " you have 
done me the honor to accept my judgment upon the 
advantages of the site for the purposes of a mill ; I 
will accept your judgment upon the price. If you will 
return with me to the house we will adjust the matter 
on these terms." Winter would have been willing to 
pay the farmer his price although he thought the price 
somewhat exorbitant, but inasmuch as he had asked 
the judgment of his friend upon the price simply that 
the latter might get the goodwill of the farmer he felt 
a little cheap to have Goodnow view the matter in so 
unselfish a way. However, he consoled himself with 
the reflection that he had thought the price a trifle 
high. He was awakened from his reflections by a 
remark of Spooner who had engaged in conversation 
with the farmer. 

To be concluded. 



A;^^i^ Vers^i 



Cornell and Syracuse will send track teams to 
Paris this summer to compete in the Olympian 
games, 



THE SONG OF THE SIX-OARED SHELL. 

(Contributed.) 
I'm a relic of the prowess of the Agricultural College : 

I am old and 1 am broken, but I've seen a thing or two ; 
I've run my race and won it with the Aggie College colors, — 
We were leading near a minute on the crimson Harvard 
crew. 

I'm at rest among the rafters in the Drill Hall of the College, 
^nd I'm hardly ever noticed by the students of to-day ; 

But should you ever ask me who it was that broke the record, 
I can shiver all my timbers and can swear to what I say. 

What a crowd there was that morning — that were floating on 
the river — 
As they took me from the boat-house — 'twas a sturdy col- 
lege crew ; 
And how the people cheered us as they laid me on the water. 
And the coach he looked us over and he said that we 
would do. 

I was strong and smooth and buoyant as I glided o'er the 
surface 
On that memorable morning in July of seventy-one ; 
The boys were full of spirits, they were full of youth and vigor; 
They had had no time for training, but what could be done 
they'd done. 

But why tell again the story of that ever famous boat-race. 
That's been handed down for ages until now its but a shred. 

Of how we broke the record, how we beat both Brown and 
Harvard, 
How the Agricultural College came a minute in ahead. 

It Is nearly thirty summers since they took mefrom the water, 
And I've lived in different places till they brought me to 
the Hall ; 
And there among the rafters I've been stowed and there for- 
gotten. 
And 'tis there I'll stay, perhaps, until my rotten timbers fall. 

I've won honor for the College, for the Agricultural College 
That is in the town of Amherst, of Massachusetts state. 

And should you ever ask me how I'd like a lick of varnish, 
I would thank you from my keelson and reply you are too 
late. 



Recent statistics show that at Iowa State College 
nineteen per cent of the students are supported by 
their parents, eight per cent furnish at least one quar- 
ter of their own support, nineteen per cent pay half or 
more, and fifty-four per cent pay their entire college 
expenses. $107,000 has been lately voted by the 
Iowa Legislature for new buildings. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



151 



Th^ Mirror. 



The only reason why the Mirror was not shattered 
into fragments at the disorderly sight which met its 
gaze some days since was because it is a remarkable 
mirror. It is an old heirloom of the family and 
has been handed down through many generations 
after an eventful history. Not only does it give a 
clear and accurate reflection, but it also has the 
power of giving, at times, pictures of events both of 
the past and future as well as of the present. 

This power was imparted to it, so the story runs, 
during the time of the Salem Witchcraft excitement. 
There was so much of this mysterious power in the 
air that some of it, I suppose, got into the Mirror. At 
any rate in times past my relatives.so I have been told, 
have seen some remarkable sights in the old Mirror, 
all of which have come to pass. 

So you can imagine my surprise and joy, when on 
looking into its sympathetic face the other evening L 
saw several pictures pass before my eyes. I will try 
to tell you what they were. 

In the first picture there were several buildings 
which I recognized at once : the chapel, the drill 
hall and the veterinary laboratory. In between the 
last two was a strange building of brown stone and of 
pleasing design. It was set back from the road some 
little distance, with a beautiful green lawn in front of 
it, broken by tastefully arranged shrubs and flower beds 
brilliant with blossoms. On the wide, airy piazza, 
which extended on all sides of the building, I saw a 
number of students seated in comfortable chairs. 
Above the door I read this inscription : M. A. C. 
Boarding Club, 1905. 

Well this is quite a contrast thought I to the M. A. 
C. Boarding Club building as I know it ; the old 
wooden building known as the "Hash House." But 
I was to be still further surprised. I was expecting to 
see the fellows line up in a flying wedge formation and 
go through the door as soon as it was opened, when 
another picture was reflected in the Mirror. 

This showed the boys filing into the building just as 
though it were their home, and they expected to get a 
good dinner without having to fight for the choice 
cuts. On one side of the wide entry into which the 
door opened, I saw a room where the boys hung their 



hats, and on the other side a well equipped lavoratory 
where they could make themselves presentable for 
appearance at the table. 

The room into which the entry led next appeared to 
my astonished gaze. It ran completely across the 
building, and was a large well lighted room containing 
several large tables. Some appropriate pictures 
hung upon the walls, and lace curtains shut out the 
glare of the sun. How different, thought I from the 
bare walls, liberally spattered with grease spots, and 
the old curtains of our present establishment. As I 
examined the tables further I saw that they were 
covered with snow-white cloths, decorated with 
flowers, picked from the garden I suppose, and taste- 
fully set with decorated chinaware that would make 
our plain cracked dishes turn green with envy. At 
intervals along the tables there were persons whose 
duty as it appeared was to carve and serve, as the 
plates were passed, in regular order, to be filled. 
The boys were waited upon by several students dressed 
in spotless white. 

I must confess that at this juncture I felt obliged to 
pinch myself to make sure I was not dreaming, but 
no, I was surely awake and the picture was really 
there in the Mirror. As the dinner proceeded quietly, 
and the boys got up and went out the scene changed 
again. 

I beheld a large, conveniently arranged kitchen with 
all the modern appliances needed in the culinary art : 
dish-washers, bread-kneaders, etc., and what caught 
my eye especially, a shining coffee heater such as we 
see so often in restaurants. Immediately this put me 
in mind of the old agate coffee pot of our day, which 
treats all to the same strength of beverage, but which 
is partial to the early comers, growing rather cool for 
those who are late. 

Then there passed before my sight pictures of other 
rooms ; the basement with its concrete floors, its fur- 
nace and store rooms, and the second floor with its 
rooms for the help, and a large, fully- equipped laundry 
where the students' clothes were laundered as well as 
the linen of the dining room. 

Here the panorama ceased, leaving me with the 
pleasant thought that in a few years. Old Aggie would 
have a home for its Boarding Club that would be a 
credit to the institution, and at the same time a wish 
that we might have had it in our day. 



152 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"AGGIE LIFE.' 



REPORT OF BUSINESS MANAGER. 



Liabilities, none. 



RESOURCES. 



Cash on hand, 

Alumni 
Subscriptions, 



$116.98 



) June '97 to June 1900, $69.00 
[ June '98 to June 1900, 50.00 
) June '99 to June 1900, 61.00 



$180.00 
13.75 
56.00 
168.80 



Foreign subscriptions, 
College subscriptions, 
Advertising, 

$535.53 
I would say in connection with the above report that 
very nearly the entire amount credited to advertising 
can be collected, while one-third, or perhaps a little 
more, should be cut from the subscriptions due as 
uncollectable. There is a large amount due for ad- 
vertising, and about twenty-five dollars more cash on 
hand than last year at this time. 

George F. Parmenter, 

Business Manager. 



Collect No^tS- 



— Spring — at last. 

— W. R. Cole, 1902, will not return to college. 

— The newly established' cut-system is reported to 
be very successful. 

— H. C. James, formerly of 1902, was about col- 
lege Friday, April 13. 

—The tennis courts are rapidly being put in order 
for the summer practice. 

— The President has been confined to his house 
for several days, with a cold. 

— The closing entertainment in the Union Lecture 
course was held Wednesday evening, April 25. 

— Kelley and Parsons, 1903, of Northampton, have 
left college with the intention of returning in the fall. 

— L. C. Clafflin, 1902, has returned to college, 
having been detained at home by illness for about two 
weeks. 

— About the middle or latter part of May the fol- 
lowing men of the sophomore class will compete be- 
fore the faculty for positions on the Burnham four : 
Blake, Dacy, Hall, Kinney, Knight, McCobb and 
West, 



— Rev. H. R. McCartney of the Village church 
preached in chapel in exchange with Dr. Walker, on 
Sunday April 23. 

— Invitations are out for the May Festival which 
the Unity church gives the first two afternoons and 
evenings in May. 

— Dickerman and Macomber of 1901 have moved 
from their rooms in South College to Mrs. Gilbert's 
on Pleasant street. 

— A mass meeting for transaction of a matter of 
business was held in the chapel on Tuesday morning 
directly after exercises. 

— Dr. H. T. Fernald gave an interesting account 
of " Voyages in Southern Seas,'' before the local 
Grange, Friday evening. 

— Gilbert, 1900, gave a very interesting paper on 
explosives at a recent meeting of the Chemical club. 
Refreshments were served, and a good time is 
reported. 

— Wednesday, April 19, a large delegation of stu- 
dents attended the reception in the town hall, given 
by Mr. and Mrs. Petit to their Thursday evening 
dancing class. 

— J. Flanagan, of London, the world's champion 
hammer thrower, made several interesting exhibitions 
of his skill on the campus the other day. The rough 
measurements showed about 150 feet. In April 1898 
his record was 156 ft. 4 in. 

— Friday, April -20, in company with Dr. Welling- 
ton about twenty of the junior class spent an enjoyable 
day looking over some of the principal industries of 
Springfield, also visiting one in Holyoke, and one in 
Northampton. The forenoon was spent in Springfield. 
The party arrived in the city about nine and visited 
first, as one of the chief points of interest, that city's 
gasworks where the manufacture of illuminating gas 
on a large scale was studied. After dinner the party 
went to Holyoke and there studied the process of 
manufacturing paper as carried on at one of the most 
prosperous of the paper mills of that city. Having 
been disappointed in their visit to the pulp mill at Mt. 
Tom, that mill_ having closed for the day, the 
party returned to Northampton, there spending a 
profitable hour in one of the silk mills of that city. 
Thi§ ended the day's trip. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



153 



— Prof. Babson announces that the following men 
of the freshman class are to compete for places on 
the Burnham Four : Franklin, Martin, Nesessian, 
O'hearn, Peebles, Proulx, Thompson, Tottingham, 
Webster and West. The competition will take place 
at the same time as that of the sophomores. 

— In Kansas City, Kans., April 12, Andrew N. 
Caudell of Washington, D. C, was married to Miss 
Penelope Cundiff, daughter of a prosperous farmer of 
Perkins, Oklahoma. Mr. Caudell, who will be remem- 
bered by many as a student in the Entomological 
Department of the college, was a graduate of Okla- 
homa college. After completing his graduate work at 
Aggie he entered the employ of the Department of 
Agriculture of the United States government. We 
copy the following from a clipping cut from a news- 
paper of April 12 : " Mr. Caudell and Miss Cundiff 
became engaged about six months ago, and the wed- 
ding was set for May. Last week, however, Mr. 
Caudell was called to Harrisonville, Mo., by the death 
of his mother. His duties made it necessary to 
start back to Washington to-morrow. He asked 
Miss Cundiff to come to Kansas City, so that the 
wedding could take place tc-day at the home of his 
sister. Miss Cundiff was unable to reacfi Kansas 
City in time, and arrangements were made with the 
telegraph company to have the marriage ceremony 
conducted at long range by wire. Mr. Caudell went 
to the probate judge's office, in Kansas City, and 
secured the marriage license. He then went to the 
telegraph office, in company with Rev. Albert H. 
Linden, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and two witnesses. The telegraph office at Mulhall 
was signalled and the answer came back that Miss 
Cundiff was there. Then the Rev. Mr, Linden sent 
this m.essage : ' Mr. Caudell and Miss Cundiff, do 
you mutually agree to be joined together in marriage ?' 
repeating the question to Mr. Caudell. Both answered, 
' Yes.' ' Then I pronounce you man and wife,' said 
the minister. The operator flashed the message to 
the waiting bride, and the ceremony was over having 
required just twenty-five minutes. 



Forty men are trying for the baseball team at the 
University of Vermont, and a good nine is expected. 
The track-team has had to be given up owing to lack 
of interest. 



E^cS^^i^^cj. 



In our last issue we divided our college exchanges 
into the weeklies, semi-m.onthlies and monthlies, and 
discussed some of the typical weeklies. The semi- 
monthlies are few in number — a fact which has sur- 
prised us a little, since for the small college which 
supports but one paper it has the double advantage of 
furnishing an opportunity for purely literary articles 
and also keeps fairly well in touch with current 
events. 

The University Cynic is a typical semi-monthly. We 
learn from an editorial that it has not been exempt 
from the usual trials, but despite them all, we can say 
of it that it has consistently maintained a high literary 
standard. A study of the Index in the current issue 
reveals the variety and scope of the subjects it has 
treated. Cynic verse has been an especially commen- 
dable feature, though the essays and stories have been 
well-done. " Detective Simms' First Case " is a 
laughable tale of college life with an element of 
improbability. " Private Morrison " is a rather novel 
treatment of a somewhat hackneyed subject. 
" ' Tramping ' by Water " is an interesting account of 
a sea-voyage to the West Indies, possibly a personal 
reminiscence. The several departments are well- 
written and in keeping with the general excellence of 
the paper. 

Of the many monthlies on our list, all but three are 
at pre;;ent " numbered among the missing." Among 
them are the Smith Montl^ly, the W. P. /., the Bru- 
nonian, the A^. H. College Monthly, the S. A. C. Lookout, 
College Life, Western University Courant, the Columbia 
Spectator, the B. U. Law School Magazine and the 
Dartmouth, some of which we have not seen for 
months. ': Wherein, O ye faithless, have we so 
offended that this should be our lot ?" 

Of those which we have received and for which we 
feel correspondingly grateful, the best is unquestionably 
the Mt. Holyoke. Always one of our leading exchanges, 
the current issue is especially good. The opening 
article is an appreciative study of " The Art of Maurice 
Maiterlinck." " The Boy '" is a strong though pathetic 
tale of how a gamin of the streets converted two 
rather worldly people into helpers of the poor. The 
story is well-told, the interest sustained throughout 



154 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and the climax unusual in its strength. A thoughtful 
essay, " The Tyranny of Dialect," follows. It is a 
pleasing treatment of a timely topic. There are 
three short sketches of which " Love or War " is per- 
haps the best. " A Qualitative Analysis " is an odd 
conceit, and a " Bit of Human Nature " is rather 
well-done. " Inklings " contains much pithily-expressed 
philosophy, and the Exchange Department is as usual 
discriminating and appreciative. In short, the whole 
paper bears witness to a steadfast adherence to high 
literary ideals. 

Of the many interesting articles in our other ex- 
changes we mention the following: " A Fortunate 
Interruption," and " Heidelberger Schloss," Chronicle; 
" Dorothy," Radiator; " Whose Joke Was It ?" Latin 
and High School Reuiew ; "John Watkins, Private," 
Holyoke Herald; "That Very FreshFreshman," Sem- 
inary Oplnator ; -'The Sage of the Seniors." Lowell 
High School Review ; "One More Fool," Pierian; 
" Rev. Mr. Sanctuary" and "An Author's Mail," 
Imp; " A Practical Joke," Sagamore. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

M. I., T. is planning to have a dual meet with 
Brown. 

The Worcester Tech track team has just begun 
practice. 

The recent debate between Brown and Boston 
Universities was won by Brown. 

$200,000 was recently appropriated by the New 
York Legislature for a State Veterinary School. 

Dartmouth is attempting to raise $100,000 before 
1901 in honor of the hundredth anniversary of Web- 
ster's graduation. 

The University of Wisconsin has recently estab- 
lished a School of Commerce, the purpose of which 
is to fit its students for the higher business pursuits. 

At Yale an athlete must have a standing twenty-five 
per cent better than the average of his class. The 
undergraduates claim that this rule is killing Yale 
athletics. 

The international games between Oxford and Cam- 
bridge and Harvard and Yale, which were to have 
been held in this country this fall, have had to be 
given up on account of Harvard's refusing to take 
part unless the games were held at Cambridge. 



Athletic |Slo-t^$. 



Amherst, 9 ; Aggie, 6. 
On Thursday, April 19, Aggie played hsr first prac- 
tice game with Amherst, being defeated by the above 
score. The game was, from the start very ragged, 
both teams making a good many errors. The batting 
of Aggie was better than that of Amherst as the Am- 
herst men succeeded in making only three clean hits. 
In the box Bodfish was far superior to the Amherst 
man but received poor support. In the last inning 
Aggie rallied and showed possibilities for fast ball. 
The score : 



Biram, s.s. 
Couch, c.f. 
Tinker, lb. 
Hawley. c. 
Kent, 2b. 
Keedy, l.f. 
Field, 3b. 
Moore, r.f. 
Harroun, p. 



P.O. 

4 
1 

9 
2 
4 

1 





Total, 


31 

AGGIE. 


5 


9 


21 


11 


8 




A.B. 


R. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Halligan, 2b. 


3 


1 





3 


3 





Cook, c. 


4 





1 


5 


1 


1 


O'Hearn, 


4 





1 


2 


3 


? 


Graves, 


4 








10 








Pierson, 


4 

















Paul, 


3 


2 


1 








2 


Bowler, 


4 


2 


2 








1 


Macomber, 


3 


1 


1 








n 


Bodfish, 


3 











4 





^ 


— 


— 


— 


— 





— 



32 



20* 



3 4 
2 I 



12 



6 7 
1—9 
3—6 



Total, 
*The other was a foul bunt on third strike. 

Innings, 
Amherst, 
Aggie, 

Sacrifice hit — Kent. Stolen bases— Tinker, Kent 2, Hawley, Biram 2, 
Moore 2, Keedy, Field, Paul 2, Bowler 2, Macomber. Three-base hit — 
Hawley. First base on balls — off Harroun 5, oif Bodfish 4. Left on bases — 
Amherst 7,; Aggie 10. Struck out— by Bodrish 6, by Harroun 2. Wild 
pitches — Harroun, Bodfish. Time — 1 hr. 50 m. Umpire — Swift and 
Breckenridge. 

Amherst, 8 ; Aggie, 3. 
Amherst defeated Aggie in the final game of the 
practice series 8 to 3. The Amherst team showed a 
decided improvement, notably in team work and bat- 
ting, while the Aggie team was changed about quite a 
bit and the men were not sure of their positions. 
Harroun and Bowler were hit for a total of ten bases 
each, Amherst having two doubles and a triple. Two 
errors, a sacrifice, a base-on- balls and a two-bagger 
scored three of the Amherst men in the second and 
four more runs were added in the third on errors and 
Favour's three-base hit. Amherst's cost run came in 
in the last inning, the seventh, on a double and a 



AGGIE LIFE. 



155 



single. Three clean singles in the third scored 
Aggie's first tally and a base-on-balls and a pair of 
singles in the next inning ended her scoring with two 
more runs. The score : 



Biram, s.s. 
Harris, r.f. 
Couch, c.f. 
Tinker, l.f. 
Field, 3b. 
Kent, 2b. 
Favour, lb. 
Priddy, c. 
Harroun, p. 



AMHERST. 














A.B. 


B. 




P.O. 




A. 


E. 


4 


1 












2 


4 


















4 


1 




2 




1 





4 


2 




1 










3 


n 









2 





3 







7 




2 





3 


1 




4 




1 


1 


3 


1 




6 




2 





3 







1 







1 


34 


6 




21 




8 


4 


Aggie. 














A.B. 


B. 




P.O. 




A. 


E. 


5 


1 




3 




5 


2 


4 


2 




2 







1 


4 







1 




2 


1 


4 


1 




11 










4 


1 




2 




1 





4 


3 









1 





4 


1 















3 







2 







1 


3 


1 









3 


2 


35 


10 




21 




12 


7 




1 


2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 







3 


4 








1—8 










1 2 








0—3 



Total, 



Halligan, 2b. 
O'Hearn, 3b. 
Paul, s.s. 
Graves, lb. 
Henry, c. 
Pierson, r.f. 
Macomber, c.f. 
Cook, l.f. 
Bowler, p. 

Total, 
Innings, 
Amherst, 
Aggie. 

Runs— Harris, Couch 2, Tinker 2, Field, Kent, Favour, Graves, Cook, 
Bowler. Total bases — Amherst 10, Aggie 10. Sacrifice hit — Kent. 
Stolen bases — Tinker, Paul, Graves. Two-base hits — Couch, Priddy. 
Three-base hit — Favour. First base on balls — off Harroun 3. off Bowler 1. 
First base on errors — Amherst 3, Aggie 8. Left on base — Amherst 3, 
Aggie 3. Struck out — by Harroun 3, Bowler 2, Double play — Bowler to 
Halligan to Graves. Passed balls— Priddy 1 , Henry 1. Time— 1 h. 30 m. 
Umpires — Watson and Bodfish. 

There is a fair prospect of our securing a meet with 
Amherst in the near future. We understand that the 
matter is already partly arranged. Now, this is just 
what we need. It means a great deal to us if we can 
secure this privilege. If we can make a good show- 
ing probably our prospect for admittance into the 
league will be insured. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The Farmstead of " The Rural Science Series " by 
Isaac Phillips Roberts. The name signifies the 
character of the work. The author says, " Man is 
made partly by heredity, partly by environment, both 
may be controlled and modified to a far greater ex- 
tent than is generally supposed." Then he goes on 
to speak of the beauties of nature, and the many ad- 
vantages country life has over a life in many of our 
cities. This is discussed especially as regards health. 
Roberts states as a fact that more than one-half of 
the total number of college students come from the 
farms, and that the value of the great men and noble 
women, who come from the rural regions, can never 
be estimated. Everything relative to a successful 



and enjoyable life upon a farm is taken up and dis- 
cussed in such a way as to make the book very inter- 
esting to all. 

Vanilla, by the Joseph Burnett Company. This 
book is written for the purpose of enlightening the public 
as to the importance of vanilla for household con- 
sumption and to encourage a taste for pure articles 
only. It is a complete description of the remarkable 
orchid known as Vanilla. This grows wild in the 
Valley of Mazantla in almost inaccessible tropics. 
There is probably no plant which is so valuable com- 
mercially about which so little is known, and it is to 
bring it before the public notice that the Burnett 
Company published this book. Many years have 
been spent in investigating this plant and the results 
are treated under three heads : Its Habitat and His- 
tory, its Culture and its Curing. The plant grows 
naturally in some localities but is much improved by 
cultivation. Used as a medicine during the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries. The description of the 
curing process is given with full particulars. 



umni. 



72. — Edward G. Howe has published a work entitled 
" Advanced Elementary Science." This is one of the 
International Educational series. 

74. — Henry Lyman Phelps died of pneumonia 
March 24, at his home in West Springfield. 

'89. — H. E. Woodbury M. D., is now practicing in 
Natick, Mass. 

'93. — We are requested to publish the following 
addresses under the heading of the Class of '93 : — 

J. D. Baker, New Boston, Conn. 

F. G. Bartlett, cor. Cabot and Sycamore Sts., Hol- 
yoke, Mass. 

H. D. Clark, 12 Mechanic St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

G. F. Curley, Milford, Mass. 

H. C. Davis, 93 Pryor St.. Atlanta, Ga. 

C. A. Goodrich, 5 Haynes St., Hartford, Conn. 

F. T. Harlow, Marshfield, Mass. 

H. J. Harlow, West Boylston, Mass. 

E. A. Hawkes, cor. Fourth and Broad Sts., Rich- 
mond, Va. 

F. H. Henderson, 49 Meridian St., Maiden, Mass. 
E. C. Howard, New Hartford, Conn, 



156 



AGGIE LIFE. 



F. S. Hoyt, 91 Alden Ave.. New Haven, Conn. 

E. H. Lehnert, 86 Church St., CHnton, Mass. 

A. E. Melendy, 4 Dover St., Worcester, Mass., or 
Sterling, Mass. 

S. R. Perry, 8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 
C. A. Smith, Los Angeles, Cal. 
L. W. Smith, Monteno, 111. 

F. A. Smith, Enclid Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

H. F. Staples, Solon, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. 
L. A. F. Tinoca, Campos, Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 
E. J. Walker, Box 315, Clinton, Mass. 

'94. — J. E. Gifford is now in charge of H. W. 
Stockwell's Devon Stockfarm. Mr. Gifford has 
recently been elected a member of the Sutton School 
board. 

'94. — H. J. Fowler is in the employ of the Bowker 
Fertilizer Co. Address Brighton, Mass. 

94. — Dr. Charles H. Higgins, Bacteriologist to the 
Canadian government, has been transferred from the 
" Animals Quarantine System " to the " Department 
of Public Health." The Doctor's work is in connec- 



tion with the prevention of the Bubonic plague which 
it is feared may enter the country through the Victo- 
ria Quarantine. Address, Public Health Quarantine 
Station, Victoria, British Columbia. 

'95. — Wednesday, April 1 1 , in Dayton, Ohio, at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. George A. Billings 
was married to Miss Minerva Ferrabee, The couple 
will be at their home. Woodbine, New Jersey, after 
April 20th. Mr. Billings is teacher at the Baron de 
Hirsch Agricultural and Industrial school at Woodbine. 

'95. — E. A. White was in town recently. Mr. 
White has accepted the position of instructor in Horti- 
culture and Botany at the Agricultural School at 
Woodbine, N. J., he will also have charge of the 
greenhouse. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them -free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute. 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 




innuiiiiiinuuiuiuuiuiuiiuiuiuiHui 



mimm 



Only Linimsnt 

Thai is Equally Efficacious for 

Internal and External Use. 

Johnson's Anodyne Liniment is the oldest, safest, most 
relialile liniment on earth. It is made of pure vegetable 
ingredients, prepared with the utmost skill and care, and 
it may be taken internally and given to children as safely 
as it may be used for rubbing the surface of inflamed por- 
tions of the body. It was originated In 1810, and has 
been constantly in use since then for the relief and cure 
of inflammation, and all the many diseases which begin 
with inflammation. It has won highest praise from ath- 
letes, especially from golf pla3'ers, for its value in 
strengthening, toning, invigorating the muscles and the 
cure of sprains, stiffness and soreness. It is a preventive 
of "golf arm." It is the first thing needed in all the acci- 
dents athletes are accustomed to. After a bicycle ride or 
any exercise, briskly rubbing the muscles with JOHN- 
SON'S Anodyne Liniment will double the value of the 
exercise. It keeps the muscles firm, the joints supple 
and the skin healthful. 

(Johnson: 

has an unequalled record of nearly a Century of Cures. 

It should be kept on hand for prompt treatment of colic, 
cramps, diarrhoea, cholera morbus, bites, bruises, burns, 
stings, chafing, chilblains, colds, coughs, croup, catarrh, 
bronchitis, la grippe, lameness, muscle soreness, and 
pain and inflammation in any part of the body. In two 
size bottles, 25 cents and 50 cents. The larger size is 
more economical, holding three of the smaller. 

I. S. JOHNSON & CO. 22 Custom House St., Boston, Mass. 

Write for a free copy of "Treatment for 
Disease! and Care of the Sick Boom." 



iminniiimiiiiiiui 



UUUittHBIIBSUiil 



IIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIII 



■""""""""""=^ 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

cientificHmerican. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, IL Sold by all newsdealers. 

Ml)NN4Co.36'Broadway,NewYork 

Branch Office, 625 P St., WashlnBton, D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Kemember these suits mepressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 

KeUogg's Block, Ajiiherst, Mass. 



Wc Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served- 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St.. Chicago. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



UHIOH TEeGHEBS' fl[:E{IOIEe OF HPIERiGH. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pittsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York,- Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Uuquallfied facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHIi^GTON, t). C, 0? PITTSBUI^G, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWK, D. D. S. 



STS. 



Cutlbk's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Houks : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien desired. 



M. A. C. students desirous of first class work at reasonable 
prices will find the following list of interest. 

Main Springs, $1.00, warranted one year. Cleaning, $1 to $2.50. 
Balance Staff, $1.50. 

JEWELRY AND OPTtCAL WSRK. 

Plain Gold Rings soldered, 25c. to 35c. Chased Gold Rings 
soldered, 25c. to 35c. Stone Rings, 50c. Gold Eye Glass or 
Specs soldered, 35c, Eye Glass Spring, gold filled, 35c. Eye 
Glass Springs, gold, 50c. Riding Bows, nickel, 25c. Riding 
Bows, gold filled, 50c. Jewelry Roman colored, 25c. Eye Glass 
an<l Spec Lenses, 25c. to $1.00. 

All work sent by mail for repair returned the same day. 



Jeweler, Optician and Engraver, 



27 Main St., 



Northampton, Mass, 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
OflBce, Cook's Block, Amherst, MasH. 



aGGiK JLlFxi. 



Start iti Basiness for Yoarself. 



SUCCESS ASSUMED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



DARRAGH & RICH, 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. Tt?OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
DEHLEB IN STOVES HND BHHUES. 

AGENT FOE THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam, and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



^^. ^. El EDEF^, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 

HUNT'S BLOCK, AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and A thletic Groups^ <2fc. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 

ILE TAILOR.* 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY 

Kd^ All suits made in my own work-shops. .^^J 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehasetts flgpiealtopal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Perclieroii Horses and Soutndoi Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGrlE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPEBATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



W. W. B 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Bircli Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



XORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



E. B. HI! 



, H. H. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours: 

9 TO 12 y^. IvI-, 1-30 TO 5 F. IVE. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IB"CrBBEIS <3-OOr5S. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Jtg-Kepairing done while you tvait,.^tr 
2 PSrCENJX MOW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. It. FAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

A.MITY 8TMJEET, AMBERST, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, Gents' Fyraislinis, 

FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

OtiSJtoi:*! JVIeiclo Olottiing. 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST. MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establisliment, 



A.gsie> A.^G>x%.-t^ 



H. Xv. Ci*A.IVEj »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SNSs:3A.TISFA.CTI03Sr C3-TJ-A.Et A.NTEE1D. a>S^ 

Office : 
Next Dooe West of Amity St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE: 



ftige's itHletlG Ootflttlis.^ 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NE\N STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 FranJelin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. KELTON. 



R. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



PflOLTRY, VESETHBLES, FlSji 0P OYSTERS. 



35, 87 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUD/O. 

Society, Class ancl Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



les Main Stkeet, Noethampton, Mass. 

Telcplione connection. 



Where 

VfetandCold 




li 



Consider— if yon can Tieep tlie wet out 
of your rifle it mil not rustnoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 

have Solid Tops, shedding -water like a 
duck's back. Our 197-paoe book (just out) 
tells all about tbem. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about powders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes, quantities, how to 
load ; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom, etc.: 
trajectories, velocities,penetratioas. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
1,000 other things, including many trade 
secrets never before given to the public. 
. Free if you will send stamps for postage to 
* The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



m 



W<A 



^^;^-3v«ii?'i't 



The M. N. Spear Book Store. 

ESTABLISHED FIFTT TEAES. 

Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets^ ^2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made on quantities. 
studio, 17 Spring Street, - - A-MMERST, MASS. 



Hmberst Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Maivaqer-. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A. 



S 



DEALER IN 



WflTGHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 



REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LAKGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN "WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM ASfD HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



NA/E: MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The florthampton M Store. 

li. K. CHEW, Manager. 

CoR. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 

MASS.jlGRICULTUIiAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the puhllc 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 
PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST. MASa. 



GLYNN, 



tTAI LOR> 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS. 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



■ t > :the:: < {> 

ilftaesacbueetts 

Haricultural 

College 



OFFERS 



1. A SHORT WINTER COUZISE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity,, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST G-RADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 




u- 



T' 




wiU rV^, 






May 16, 1900. 



^^ ^1f^ 




% 



A. ^r io tilt tzira^l 

Oollog;^ 



OL. X. 



NO. 14. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISHIISiOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 






An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A nev? and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AWHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



^'5yr(, 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $J.J0. 
Patent Leathers, $2.^0 to %S.oo. 



REIRAIRINO.^^^ 

New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 



Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms, 
PRICEIS RIGHT. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELER 



BENNETT 



CflLLE&E 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen i^i our repair department. 

;8®-EYES FITTED FREE^gg' 
By a graduate of De. Foster, Occulist. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




iC^w,^^ 



COLXj.A.E,S 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 16, 1900. 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Conmmunications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears -are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901, Athletics. JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901, Library Notes. 

THOMAS CASEY, 1901, Alumni Notes. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Exchanges. 

CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902, College Notes. ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 

CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 

Terms: $1.00 per ijear in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. 
C. L. Rice, Manager. 
J. H. Chickering Sec. 
Reading-Room, C. T. 



Athletic Association, 
Base-Ball Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 
Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
J. C. Hall, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cd 1*10 rials. 



We are pleased to learn that the Seniors have de- 
cided to have a Promenade at Commencennent. The 
movement should receive hearty support from every- 
one. The holding of fraternity banquets in the mid- 
winter has left the field open for a social event of this 
character that if properly carried out may be made a 
distinctive feature of the Commencement week. 



It was a felicitous judgment that led to the build- 
ing of our college on this commanding knoll ; and it 
seems hardly possible as one stands upon the county 
road and gazes across the meadow and the pond that 
there could be in all this beautiful and far-famed 
Connecticut Valley a spot more beautiful and more 
suitable for the location of a college. Here one may 
come and spend the summer of his life among his 
books, the grass, and the flowers. No warring of 
men, nor anything else should mar the memory of 
those four years. 



It may be of interest to many to know how the 
speakers to represent the Senior class at Commence- 
ment are chosen. The matter lies wholly in the 
hands of the Faculty. Six speakers are selected, of 
which number three are chosen according to their 
rank in scholarship. Three more are then chosen 
according to their rank in oratory. If, however, any 
that are chosen for their oratorical ability have been 
previously chosen for excellency in scholarship their 
names are thrown out and the vacancies are filled by 
choosing again' on the basis of scholarship ; or if any 
chosen for their oratorical rank are below the average 
of the class in scholarship their names are thrown out 
and the election proceeds again on the basis of 
scholarship. 



The news that a meet has been arranged to take 
place either with Amherst alone or with Amherst and 
the Springfield Training School conjointly comes as 
good tidings. The whole plan has met with the 
hearty approval of the fellows because there has been 
a strong sentiment in favor of continuing our track 
athletic work. Those in charge were wise to see in 



158 



AGGIE LIF£. 



which direction popular sentiment lay and then to put 
themselves in sympathy with it. It has always been 
a matter of regret that it was necessary to give up the 
meet with Worcester Tech. for there was great prom- 
ise that if hearty support had been given we could 
have made a good showing in a contest with them. 
The coming event, however, means quite as much to 
us, and the manager is to be congratulated that he 
has secured such an opportunity. Let's make the 
most of it. Give them a hard, but kindly rub. That's 
what they want. Turn out fellows, despite the 
weather, and make each moment count. 



Few persons travel far on the voyage of life with- 
out coming under the influence of a powerful person- 
ality. Either by personal contact with some mag- 
netic nature or else through the influence of some 
mind that has left us the legacy of its ennobling 
thought we find our own life molded, our own mind 
swayed, sometimes even violently agitated by some 
daring speculation, frequently carried by storm at the 
sight of some heroic figure, again, unconsciously but 
surely won by the subtle charms of a happy tempera- 
ment. Individual instances that may serve to illus- 
trate our thought are many. Examples of writers 
who have exerted, and will always exert, a powerful 
stimulus on the youthful mind are abundant. How 
many have felt the inspiration that Emerson gives 1 
But more potent still to exert an abiding influence on 
an Individual life than any writing can ever be is the 
attractive force of a strong personality in the person of 
a daily companion. Here is a field of force that will 
turn the course of our life and thought in spite of us, 
that will help to mold our character whether we will 
or no. 



Commencement is the time of opportunity. For 
those who covet the applause of men. or love to gaze 
into the eyes of an appreciative audience and to feel 
the thrill which comes from the sight of a multitude 
of faces, — eager, expectant, and interested, Com- 
mencement is an hour of grandest opportunity, a time 
for achieving the heart's desire. Those who can feel 
the inspiration of such an hour should realize that 
never again in their lives will there be such an oppor- 
tunity for high achievement in that branch of intel- 



lectual culture in which they find the greatest delight. 
Where will the Commencement orator ever again 
meet the same critical and sympathetic audience 
that assembles at graduation to hear the declamations 
of the young men and women who are going forth to 
battle with the problems of life ? He will probably 
never again find a time in his life so well calculated 
to draw out the most that is in him. He will be con- 
scious of a desire to conquer that may never be is 
again. He is as yet unacquainted with the world. 
Enthusiasm, aspiration, and longing, which actual life 
has not yet dampened, the hopes of a youth inex- 
perienced in the world of affairs and ready to plunge 
into the ocean of life's great turmoil of absorbing 
interests, are bearing him up. Disappointment and 
misfortune he has not yet met. The figure of a 
youth standing thus on the brink of life is an interest- 
ing one. And men are attracted by it, the more 
perhaps because they were once in the same position 
or because they are acquainted with life, its hopes and 
its dark despairs. To a youth who is ready to take 
up the great work of life every inspiration may be a 
stepping stone to success. Thus the Commencement 
stage may mean an inspiration to grander achieve- 
ment in after years. From this point of view it is a 
policy of wisdom that leads to the selection of Com- 
mencement speakers according to their rank in oratori- 
cal study if that rank be indicative of their interest in 
the work. For to such the opportunity means a great 
deal more than to those who simply look upon the 
whole matter as a duty to be well performed, but 
nothing more. 



A SUBJECT that ouglit to interest everybody and 
none more deeply than the farmer is that of the de- 
struction of our insectivorous birds for no better reason 
than the adornment of the hats of women. It is be- 
coming a matter of great economic importance aside 
from all questions of the moral wrong involved, and it 
is high, time that the agricultural people of the country 
come to a realization of the necessity of combating a 
mania that threatens havoc to their interests. Per- 
haps there is very little immediate danger to be ap- 
prehended and yet it would take but a short time if 
the fad of wearing birds' feathers should become ex- 
tremely popular to cripple the agricultural interests in 



AGGIE LIFE. 



159 



many parts of our country. It is stated that already- 
the depletion of our song birds has had a very notice- 
able effect, and it is believed that were the numbers 
to be very greatly reduced such a scourge of insect 
pests would at once overrun the country that farming 
would be impossible. Artificial means such as spray- 
ing can never take the place of the birds, nor is the 
struggle for existence among the insects severe 
enough to keep down their numbers, else why has 
nature ordained that some of them shall be food for 
birds. Man has found that his success is insured 
according as he co-operates with the forces of nature. 
The terrible consequences of disregarding these forces 
have been already experienced in too many dearly- 
bought lessons. Man cannot afford to ignore them. 
Among the birds most popular for millinery purposes 
are the gulls and the terns, and thousands are probably 
killed annually. The value of these birds as scaven- 
gers of harbors is well known. The destruction of the 
sea-birds becomes of supreme economic importance 
from the point of view of the safety of public health in 
our seaboard cities. The Audubon society is accom- 
plishing a noble work in their effort to bring out and 
foster a sentiment against the wholesale destruction 
of our beautiful birds, the true friends of man and 
co-workers with him in the successful pursuit of agri- 
culture. The growing senti'ment that revolts at the 
inhuman slaughter of our feathered friends is very 
encouraging but it is not yet powerful enough to stop 
the annual slaughter of thousands of beautiful and 
desirable birds. The motive which seems to be at 
the bottom of this despicable business is that of mak- 
ing money, a motive which has never yet found appro- 
bation among men when associated with meannesss, 
selfishness, and cruelty. The act of killing these 
birds should be considered an offense against the pub- 
lic good, and hence a crime and consequently ame- 
nable to law and justice. The act of Senator Hoar in 
bringing this matter up for the consideration of the 
nation, and the nation's law making body, was far from 
showing any littleness of mind as has been suggested 
or im.plied. On the contrary it showed the statesman- 
like character of that aged patriot, the one figure of 
personal greatness to which this country can point 
with pride as a representative of the best that her soil 
ever produced, when he was able to turn aside from 
the absorbing trivialities of petty party politics to con- 



sider some question that was really of national eco- 
nomic importance ; and it showed that the love of the 
beautiful was not yet dead in the breasts of our great 
men. 



FARMER GOODNOW OUTWITTED. 

(Concluded.) 

" That's a fine herd of cows in the field yonder," 
Spooner was saying, " whose are they may 1 ask?" 

" They are mine," replied Goodnow, '' will you not 
step over by the wall and get a closer view ?" 

" A fine herd of Holsteins. By the way," asked 
Spooner, " has the cattle inspector been round to 
examine your herd yet ?" 

The farmer's face darkened ; he swallowed a some- 
thing in his throat, and then said : 

" No, he hasn't come yet, and it will be better for 
him if he never does." 

"Why, my friend," replied Goodnow, " he is bound 
to come as the State has sent him for that purpose. 
It is useless to oppose the law." 

" The law be hanged," replied the farmer, now 
thoroughly worked up, " if they call such an accursed 
institution as that farce of sticking a thermometer 
into a cow a law then I don't want anything to do 
with the law." 

"Oh! I see," said Spooner, " you think the law is 
unjust. But don't you realize that the inspector is 
bound to come and that you can't help yourself ? " 

" Well," replied Goodnow, " perhaps he will but it 
will be the sorriest day in his life if he does." 

A silent party they turned away from the wall and 
resumed their walk towards the house. Spooner was 
first to break the silence. 

" Farmer Goodnow," he said, " I appreciate your 
position but I know that if you persist in disregarding 
the power of the law you will have a hard time. I 
will tell you what I'm willing to do. As I have often 
examined cattle for this disease, I will agree to 
examine yours free of charge and to make the matter 
right with the authorities." 

The farmer hesitated. 

" I think it would be your wisest course to accept 
my agent's proposition," said Winter taking part in 
the conversation for the first time. 

Goodnow did not reply at once, yet it could be seen 
that Winter's suggestion had its weight. 



1 66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



" I hate like poison to consent to any such nonsen- 
sical decree," he finally replied, " but 1 suppose the 
law will have its course. If you care to waste your 
time in such idle nonsense why 1 suppose you may. 
It will probably do the cattle no harm. In fact that 
isn't my point ; its the principle of the thing that 1 
look at. I can't endure the thought of any stranger 
coming on my premises and taking the law and my 
property into his own hands in the name of the State." 

" 1 guess we can save you from that discomfort," 
replied Spooner, who was so pleased at his own suc- 
cess that he could hardly control his features. 

They soon reached the house. The success of his 
business transaction and the thought of getting rid of 
the unpleasantness that the inspection law had threat- 
ened had put the farmer in a happy mood. Entering 
the house they soon settled the matter of the mill site. 
The papers were duly made out and the transaction 
closed, the seal of the justice being alone further 
required. Winter and his friend prepared to leave. 

" As I expect to be in the neighborhood but a few 
days I will call to-morrow to begin the inspection," 
said Spooner, as with his companion he drove out of 
the yard. 

" All right," called the farmer as they drove away. 

True to his promise Spooner called on the morrow. 
He found the farmer in a cheerful mood. The cattle 
had been kept in the stable in expectation of his 
visit. Accompanied by the farmer he proceeded at 
once to the stables. These he found in a condition 
of spic-span cleanliness everything showing the most 
scrupulous care. 

" I guess we won't find much of disease in these 
quarters,' Spooner said. 

" I guess you won't either," replied Goodnow, " the 
idea of thinking that you would 1 " 

" But, my friend, I didn't come here with that idea. 
I am making this inspection with your consent. Am 
I not to show to the authorities that your herd is free 
from disease ?" 

" I suppose so," growled the farmer. 

" There is no pleasure talking with the man on this 
subject," thought Spooner, and he set about his work. 

The farmer watched the process of taking tempera- 
tures .with a most skeptical expression that now and 
again changed to one of bitter hatred or again to one 
of scorn. Spooner soon completed his task, and hav- 



ing made out his records he pronounced the first part 
of the task done. He remained during the da:y at the 
farmer's house spending the time in conversation with 
the owner or in roaming over the farm. At noon 
and nightfall he took the temperatures again. After 
supper he drove away having made arrangements to 
inoculate on the second day following. 

The two days passed, the cattle were inoculated. 
The temperatures were taken a second time. Not 
a trace of tubercular disease had Spooner been 
able to find. The farmer having his convictions 
thus confirmed was inclined to ridicule the whole 
idea more than ever and poured into Spooner's 
ear a fearful tirade against the State and the ignorant 
boss politicians. Nevertheless he showed great pleas- 
ure that the matter had been settled and thanked 
Spooner for his kindness, Spooner, equally glad that 
the job was finished, accepted most humbly the prof- 
fered thanks and though feeling that he had resorted 
to a rather unfair expedient, yet consoled himself that 
the affair had passed over so successfully, feeling very 
thankful that no case of infection had been discovered. 

" Now you will please make this matter right with 
the proper authorities," said Goodnow as Spooner was 
about to drive away, " I don't want any more of you 
inspectors on my premises." 

" Yes, 1 will see to that," replied Spooner waving 
his hand, and bidding the farmer goodbye. 

"I'd give a good deal to be round when yon crank 
reads the letter I shall send him in a few days," 
thought Spooner as he drove rapidly through the town. 

During the days following his inspection of Good- 
now's herd he completed his work in the neighborhood, 
spending the last night of his stay with his friend. 
Neighbor Jackwood. He then returned to Boston. 
A few days after Farmer Goodnow received the fol- 
lowing letter : 

Boston, Mass., Oct. 9, '92. 
Office of State Inspector of Bovine Animals. 

This is to certify that I have examined John Good- 
now's herd and have found them free of tubercular 
disease. 

(Signed) David A. Spooner, 

State Inspector. 



The catalogue of the University of Maine shows 
577 students. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



i6i 



^if Vers^. 



THE DYING SAILOR S LAMENT. 

Barks, that at your anchors ride 

The swelling tide ! 

0, how 1 long to be, 
Once more, O Captain, by thy side. 
To sail the briny ocean wide, 

The deep and boundless sea. 

Thou stormy seas shall soon sail o'er, 

Where billows roar. 

And men are glad and free ; 
But I am left upon the shore 
To weep that 1 may nevermore 

My Captain sail with thee. 

^ 

THE COLLEGE AND ITS MISSION. 

[Communicated. ] 

The editorial on page 123 of Aggie Life deals with 
a subject that must have attracted the attention of 
interested alumni many times in past years. The 
editor concludes that " the trouble is inherent with us, 
and until the disagreeable features of the college are 
eradicated, we cannot hope for an increase in 
numbers." 

It seems to me that a' few things have been lost 
sight of in considering the matter of the development 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

If the college supplies a satisfactory grade of 
instruction, has competent instructors, provides an 
adequate equipment, and advertises the institution in 
a reasonable way, it is about doing its duty. The 
people themselves have some responsibilities in the 
case. It is their college. If they do not care to edu- 
cate their sons in it, whose fault is it besides their 
own ? A well-officered and well-equipped agricultural 
college should not be condemned because it cannot 
convert a multitude to be educated to a business they 
are not in sympathy with. 

It is the writer's opinion that one of the most 
important reasons why farmers' sons do not attend the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college is because 
the average Massachusetts farmer is asleep, so 
far as his business is concerned. A great contrast 
exists when progressive methods are considered, if we 
compare the farmers of the East with those of the 
West. Those of the West are constantly seeking new 
ideas and better methods. The average western 



farmer is a power in the commuuity. Bankers, busi- 
ness men and the people of towns generally, view the 
farmer as one whose prosperity is quite essential to 
their own. Here the farmer is respected, his children 
are educated, and the agricultural college and farmers' 
institute are important factors in his development. In 
much of New England, however, the farmer occupies 
quite a different position. The urban population too 
often regards him as a " clodhopper," as he too often 
is. Excepting among market gardeners and dairy- 
men, one sees much of old-fashioned, antiquated 
farming in New England. The farmers are not inter- 
ested in their business, and so but few of them care 
about the agricultural college, unless to complain of 
taxes they must pay in its support. But the college 
is not to blame for this. 

I believe that it would be unfortunate to change the 
name of the College. If that institution has any one 
distinctive field in'' Massachusetts, it is an agricultural 
one. It is in that field that the college in the future 
has the greatest possibilities in the way of accomplish- 
ing good for the state. Tear down that old and 
respectable word " agricultural," and there will be 
removed the one thing from its official title that indi- 
cates the true province of the college in Massachus- 
etts. With two great schools of technology, with the 
famous university of the land, and with half a dozen 
celebrated classical colleges of high standing in little 
Massachusetts, what argument is there to remove the 
word "agricultural," excepting a shallow one? The 
college should make its fight for existence on the 
basis of its value to the farmers of the state in 
strengthening and adding to agricultural knowledge. 
The college can have no greater mission. 

It may be that '• the trouble is inherent," with the 
institution, but I hardly think so, excepting in a minor 
way. It rather lies with the farmers. They need an 
awakening. It will be slow work, but time will cure 
all things. In the meantime the institution should 
keep on in its good work, having ever in mind the 
agricultural interests of the state as its greatest charge. 

C. S. Plumb, '82. 



Much interest has been aroused by the " Brown 
Week " at Dartmouth. Dartmouth won the baseball 
game, but was defeated in the debate and track 
athletics. 



l62 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^olle^^ fSIot^S" 



— J. C. Hall, 1902, has been home, a victim of the 
grippe. 

— R. I. Smith, 1901, has returned to College after 
a short illness. 

— The President, who has been in Washington for 
a week, has returned. 

— Church, 1902, recently recovered from an 
attack of the measles. 

— H. Hodgkiss, 1902, has been in Worcester and 
Springfield for a few days. 

— Phelps, 1903, has been spending a few days at 
home on account of grippe. 

— The May festivals ot both Amherst and North- 
ampton were well attended by the students. 

• — O'Hearn, 1903, had the misfortune to have a fin- 
ger put out of joint while practicing baseball. 

— H. Baker, 1900, has taken the position in the 
veterinary laboratory formerly held bv George Clarke, 
1901. 

— Prof. C. S. Walker has been elected as delegate 
to represent the Village church at the State associa- 
tion which meets in Amherst. 

— The fountain in front of South College, presented 
by the class of '82 has been re-cemented and is once 
more reminding us of the approach of summer. 

" — Prof. Mills announces the following men of the 
senior class, who have been chosen on the ground of 
scholarship and ability in speaking to represent the 
class on the Commencement stage, June 20 : Arthur 
Coleman Monahan, Edward Taylor Hull, Arthur For- 
ester Frost, Morton Alfred Campbell, Arthur Atwell 
Harmon, and Morris Bernard Landers. 

— The County Agricultural society offers liberal 
premiums for experiments in the use of fertilizers on 
certain crops. The experiments will occupy one- 
eighth of an acre. The fertilizers will be mixed and 
furnished by the Hatch Experiment at their original 
cost of 87 cents. The conditions require that the 
ground be divided into five equal parts, four of which 
will be fertilized. The plots will be numbered accord- 
ing to the number on the bag of fertilizer applied and 
the results thus kept for comparison, 



— Arrangements have been made for a formal 
Senior Promenade to be held immediately after the 
President's reception, Tuesday evening, June 19. It 
is hoped that the affair may be made as much of a 
social success as was the Military Prom. To this 
end the hearty support of the faculty, the alumni, and 
the undergraduate body is earnestly requested. Tick- 
ets to the floor will be three dollars, including the in- 
vitation cards which may be secured as soon as issued 
from the committee on arrangements. The follow- 
ing committee on arrangements has been chosen: 
Y. H. Canto, chairman; Dr. J. B. Paige. Prof. P.B. 
Hasbrouck, J. W. Kellogg, E. K. Atkins, R. D. Gil- 
bert. Arrangements for hacks may be made by con- 
ferring with Mr. E. K. Atkins. 

— We note in a " Medal List" of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, published lately and issued by 
the National Society of the same order, the following 
resolution adopted at the congress of the National 
Society S. A. R., at Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1899: 
''Resolved that a committee of three be appointed 
with power to undertake to secure from the Govern- 
ment either an old Spanish gun or a plate from one 
of the Spanish ships, from which medals may be 
struck, to be distributed to those members of the 
order who served in the recent war with Spain, and 
that they also consider the advisability of publishing a 
list of the members of the order who served in the 
recent war." In accordance with these resolutions a 
list of members who served in the recent war was 
gotten out, and a medal was presented to each of the 
members named in the list. Among those who thus 
served we note the names of the late Walter M, Dick- 
inson, Captain Seventeenth Infantry, United States 
Army; William M.Wright, Captain and Assistant 
Adjutant General, United States Volunteers, Captain 
of Second Infantry, United States Army ; and Clifford 
A. Tinker, Private First Masschusetts Heavy Artillery. 
The medal, though of alloy, is neat and tasteful, con- 
sisting of a broken star, wreath, and eagle, hung from 
a ribbon, and bearing a profile in relief of George 
Washington with the inscription " Libertas et Patria." 



The University of Michigan has won seven out of 
ten debates this year, defeating among others, the 
Universities of Chicago, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin 



AGGIE LIFE. 



163 



/Athletic I^o-t^s- 



Norwich University. 5; M. A. C, 1. 

Tuesday, May 8, Aggie was defeated in base-ball 
by Norwich University at Northfield, Vermont. Nor- 
wich University made all her runs in the first two 
innings. Bodfish was then substituted in place of 
Bowler, and he held them down without a run for the 
rest of the game. Norwich University had a profes- 
sional player in the box from Rome, N. Y. From 
the time Bodfish went into the box it was a pitcher's 
battle. Aggie's team v/ork was very good. The score : 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



Watson, tn., 
Young', 3b., 
Orser, ].f., 
McCarthy, p., 
Chace, H. A., c, 
Newton, lb., 
Chace, H. B., s.s., 
Bass, 2b., 
Pingree, r.f.. 

Total. 



Pierson, r.f., 
Paul, S.S., 
O'Hearn, 3b., 
Halligan, 2b.. 
Graves, lb., 
Bowler, p.l., 
Henry, c. 
Cook, m.c, 
Bodfish, p.l.. 



27 



1 
1 



1 


1 






5 


n 


15 














n 


9 


2 


I 





1 








4 






Total, 



Innings, 

Norwich University, 

M. A. C, 



123456789 
32000000 0—5 
10 0—1 



Two base hits— Graves, Pingree. Base on balls— Young, Orser, H. A. 
Chace, Newton, H. B. Chace, Pingree, Cook, Bodfish. Struck out by 
McCarthy, 10, by Bodfish, 7. Time— 2h.,15min. 

University of Vermont, 6; M. A. C, 1. 

On the 9th of May Aggie played University of Ver- 
mont at Burlington. It was a cold day and a strong 
wind was blowing. Inexcusable errors in the field and 
behind the bat lost the game for us. The feature of 
the game was the fine work of Bodfish. The score : 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT. 



Wasson.lc 
Murray, m., 
Hutchinson, 1 
Howe, 2b., 
Wight, lb.. 
Reed, 3b., 
Wills, s.s., 
Lamson, r.f,, 
Tailor ,Sp., 

Total, 



■f., 



4 


1 





3 





3 


1 





1 





4 


1 


3 


1 


1 


4 








3 


4 


4 








16 





3 








2 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


1 


1 








4 











8 



27 



17 



M. A. C. 










A.B. 


R. 


B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


4 








2 


1 


4 








12 





4 


1 


1 


2 


3 


4 








2 


?, 


4 





2 


1 





4 





2 


2 





4 





1 


3 





1 











3 


4 











1 


3 














36 


1 


6 


24 


10 


12 3 4 


5 6 


7 8 


9 




Vermont, 1 1 


2 1 





1—6 




1 








0—1 





Paul, S.S.. 
Graves, lb., 
O'Hearn, 3b., 
Halligan, 2b., 
Bowler, l.f., 
Pierson, r.f., 
Cook, m.c, 
Henry, c-. 
Bodfish, p., 
Macomber, m.. 

Total, 

Innings, 
Universit' 

M. A. c: 

Struck out by Bodfish 7, by Tailor 4. 

Vermont Academy, 6 ; Aggie, 5. 

The last game of the Vermont trip was lost by the 
above score when it should have been won. Halligan 
pitched a superb game, being hit for a total of four 
bases, two of which were of a scratchy order while 
Huse was touched for twelve bases. Costly errors in 
fielding and lack of judgment lost the game for our 
boys. The score : 



VERMONT ACADEMY. 



Alden, 3b., 
Orton, lb., 
Higgins, l.f., 
Sherburne, r.f., 
Huse, s.s., 
Geen, c, 
Campbell, m., 
Davis, S.S., 
Huges, 2b., 

Total, 



Paul, S.S., 
Graves, lb.. 
O'Hearn, 3b., 
Bodfish, 2b., 
Pierson, l.f.. 
Bowler, r.f., 
Cook, c, 
Macomber, m., 
Halligan, p.. 

Total, 
*Macomber out for Interference. 
Innings, 

Vermont Academy, 
Aggies, 



2 
10 
4 
1 
1 
7 
1 





4* 26 



B.H. 
2 

4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 





P.O. 


12 
3 
1 
1 

7 

3 



Runs made by Orton, Higgins, Sherburne, Huse 2, Campbell, Paul, 
Graves, O'Hearn, Cook 2. Two-base hits — Alden, Paul. Three-base hit— 
Huse. Stolen bases — Higgins, Huse. Ba.se on balls— Halligan 3, Huse 5. 
Struck out, by Halligan 2, by Huse 5, by Bodfish 2. Hit by pitched ball— 
Orton. Passed ball — Geen. Umpire — Brown. Time — 2h., 30min. 

Syracuse, 8 ; Aggie, 2. 

On Friday, May 1 Ith.Aggie played a practice game of 
eight innings with Syracuse University. The game was 
very interesting for the first three innings but after 
that it grew a little one-sided. Halligan was in the 
box at first and proved very effective, but a two-base 
hit and a three-bagger scored two runs for the visitors 
which evened the runs brought in by Graves home 



i64 



AGGIE LIFE. 



run in the second. The features of the game were 
the double play by Graves and the throwing of the vis- 
itors. The home team showed deplorable lack of 
judgment at critical times. The score : 



Adams, lb., 
House, 3b., 
Reed, c.f., 
Costello, r.f., 
Dissel, p., 
Scarsfield, 2b.. 
Cummings, l.f., 
Henderson, c. 
Grouse, s,3,, 



SYRACUSE. 
A.B. R. 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Total, 


32 

AGGIE. 


8 


8 


21 


10 


4 




A.B. 


R. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Paul, s.s., 


4 


1 


1 





2 


1 


Graves, lb.. 


4 


1 


2 


11 





) 


O'Hearn. 3b., 


4 








1 


1 


1 


Bodfish, 2b, 


4 





2 


1 


4 


n 


Pierson, l.f., 


4 





1 








? 


Bowler, r.f.. 


3 





1 





1 


n 


Cook, c. 


3 


n 





5 


4 


1 


Macomber, c.f.. 


3 





1 


1 








Halligan, p.,- 


3 








2 


3 


1 



Total, 32 2 8 21 15 7 

Sacrafice hit— Halligan, House. Stolen bases— Costello 2. Three base 
hit— Adams. Home run— Graves. Base on bal's- off Dissel 4, off Bodfish 
2. Double play — Graves unassisted. Umpire— Barry, 1901. 



CONSTITUTION OF M. A. C. READING ROOM 
ASSOCIATION. 

Article I. 
This association shall be called the M. A. C. Read- 
ing Room Association, and shall consist of the stu- 
dent body. 

Article II. 
The management of all the association's business 
shall be intrusted to a board of directors, eight in 
number, of which three shall be from the class which 
shall be the Senior class at the close of the term 
during which they are elected, which term shall be as 
herein further provided, three from the class next in 
order, and two from the class next in order. 

Article III. 
The election of directors shall be at a mass meet- 
ing of the student body which meeting shall be held 
as soon as convenient after the opening of the spring 
term. The classes shall each nominate their repre- 
sentatives at that time, their choice to be subject to 
the approval of the student body. This action shall 
signify that the whole student body shall empower 
whom they approve to act for it at all business meet- 
ings of the directors, 



Article IV. 

Any member of the board of directors may be 
removed at the wish of his class, or by a three-fourth's 
vote of students in mass meeting assembled. 
Article V. 

Section 1 . The board of directors shall meet for 
the election of officers upon the first Monday afte r 
their election. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall consist of a President 
who shall be Business Manager and who shall preside 
at the meetings of the directors ; of a Vice-President 
who shall preside at meetings in the absence of the 
President; and of a Secretary and Treasurer who shall 
keep a record of all business meetings, of all money 
spent and received, and who shall collect all taxes 
that may be levied by the association. 
Article VI. 

All bills before payment shall bear the approval of 
the Business Manager. 

Article VII. 

A total assessment of two dollars shall be levied at 
the opening of the fall term by vote of the student 
body in mass meeting. One-half of this shall con- 
stitute the first assessment and shall be collected dur- 
ing the fall term ; the other half shall constitute the 
second assessment and shall be collected during the 
winter term. 

Article VIII. 

Six directors shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. 

Article IX. 

Section 1 . Periodicals may be ordered at the dis- 
cretion of the directors who will always consider 
suggestions. 

Sec. 2. The Secretary shall see to it that all peri- 
odicals are ordered discontinued upon the expiration 
of subscription. 

Sec. 3. Within three weeks, after periodicals are 
ordered they shall be sold at auction sale to the high- 
est bidders. 

Article X. 

A notice shall be posted at the beginning of each 
term requesting bids for the position of mail carrier 
and reading room attendant. The duties of this per- 
son shall accompany this notice. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



165 



Article XI. 
A two-thirds vote of the students shall be neces- 
sary to amend this constitution. 

Ratified at mass meeting, April 24, 1900. 



C^cKd^ri^^S 



For most of our exchanges this is the season of 
transition. As we glance over the editorials it is to 
"find paragraphs beginning, " With this issue, the pres- 
ent staff lay down their rusty pens with mingled relief 
and regret," or something to that effect. There is a 
great deal of sameness to all these valedictories. 
Thus, there is hardly an editor who does not seem re- 
lieved to know that the responsibility which has 
weighed upon him for months is at last taken from 
him. Even where he has been loyally supported by 
the board and the students, his task has been by no 
m.eans easy ; but where he has had to contend not 
only with his own duties but with a host of other diffi- 
culties, where for instance he has had not only to edit 
the paper but to write most of it as well, receiving for 
his efforts nothing but hostile criticism, then has his 
position been hard indeed, and it is little wonder that 
he is glad to escape from it. And it is disheartening 
to note in how many cases, the latter state of affairs 
has prevailed. Here and there we can find a lucky 
man who can sincerely thank the students for assist- 
ance, but in the majority of cases the most he can do 
is to sigh for " what might have been." We can- 
not but wonder what will be the fate of the new boards 
which are to continue the work. " The King is dead — 
long live the King 1" The burden is shifted from the 
old but to fall upon the new. Will the incoming 
boards be supported and upheld, or will the old handi- 
cap of indifference blight their efforts too ? The stu- 
dents alone can answer. 

Our exchanges vary widely in purpose, methods 
and excellence. Some seem to realize a sense of 
responsibility ; as a result they are thoroughly credit- 
able productions. Others are apparently indifferent 
as to public opinion. Perhaps they are doing the be^t 
they can ; very likely some are not well-supported ; 
but none the less we must take them as they are, and 
not as they would like to be, and judge of the institu- 
tions from which they come accordingly. 



Of the college monthlies before us there are two 
that always leave a favorable impression. Represent- 
ing, as they do, institutions between which there is the 
keenest rivalry, it is but natural to compare the Holy 
Cross Purple and the Boston College Stylus. To our 
mind there is little choice. We notice that the cur- 
rent number of the Purple is competitive, and that 
liberal prizes have been offered. This may have 
resulted in rather more pretentious and scholarly arti- 
cles ; but after all the difference if there is one is very 
slight. 

Much of the Stylus is devoted to a discussion of 
President Eliot's criticism of Catholic colleges. The 
trend of the articles seems to be that injustice is done 
but that the best way to remedy it is to establish 
Catholic universities. Another essay treats of some 
of the evils of debating. Debaters are criticised as 
desiring victory rather than the truth, and hence pre- 
ferring plausibility to sincerity. " Dickens as a Boys' 
Author " reveals a new phase of that writer's versatil- 
ity. For fiction, there are two sketches. " With an 
Immortal " is a fanciful account of a chat with Dr. 
Samuel Johnson. " The Price uv Sugar " is laid in 
an old time country store. It is an accurate portrayal 
of a once common American type. The verse, 
especially the " Baltimore Oriole," also deserves 
commendation. 

The Purple has for its leading article, " The Play- 
er's Son," a study of the erratic career of Richard 
Sheridan. " Thought- Development in Tennyson's 
' Lotus Eaters' " is a scholarly treatment of a rather 
intricate subject. The " Letters to Living Writers " 
wnich have been so popular a feature of the Purple 
are as interesting and unique as ever. A short sketch 
contrasts Cardinal Newman and Cicero, tracing a 
resemblance in style, versatility and power. The edi- 
torials are strong and spirited ; the alumni receive 
their, just amount of attention, and the verse in the 
current issue is perhaps somewhat above the average. 
An interesting feature is the College World, which is 
surprisingly fresh and copious. As a whole, careful 
examination only serves to substantiate the claim 
made on its title-page : " The Holy Cross Purple is a 
literary m agaz ine . " 

We only wish we could say as much of the Phoenix 
and the Delaware College Review, but candor compels 



1 66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



us to admit that there is very little of literary value in 
either. The Phoenix is devoted almost wholly to 
items of local interest, and contains practically noth- 
ing for any save its subscribers. We will admit that 
a paper is run primarily for its students and not for 
Exchange Editors, and we have no adverse criticism 
on the way in which the Phoenix performs its chosen 
functions. Yet we should suppose that in an institu- 
tion of the size and standing of Swarthmore some- 
thing along purely literary lines might be produced, in 
addition to the collecting of mere news items. 

We must confess that in the Delaware College Re- 
view we have been disappointed. Though there is in 
the current number a fair amount of material, there 
is very little that is up to the normal college standard, 
" The Greek as a perfect man," is the nearest ap- 
proach to.it, but even this is deficient in originality of 
thought aind treatment. Though on an interesting 
subject it gives no sign of any save the most super- 
ficial research. " American Interests in South Af- 
rica," is somewhat better in this respect, but since its 
sole object is to give information it cannot be con- 
sidered from a literary standpoint. And " Marbles," 
the only remaining student contribution, is entirely out 
of place in what purports to be a college monthly of 
dignity and importance. Verse is conspicuous by its 
absence, though we notice an editor has been as- 
signed for it ; stories and sketches there are none, and 
the editorials are weak and insignificant. Athletic 
and inter- collegiate notes are totally neglected, though 
they too are represented on the board ; while the lo- 
cals consist almost entirely of sickening personalities 
hardly worthy of some of our more sentimental high 
schools. The one department which is conducted 
with credit is Exchanges. These give evidence of a 
painstaking and critical judgment. The remainder of 
the paper indicates an indifference on the part of both 
students and editors to the welfare of their magazine 
and to the college which it represents. 

The Spectrum from North Dakota and the Aurora 
from California, cannot be called true literary month- 
lies, as their news items take up most of their space. 
The Spectrum contains an interesting sketch of the 
life and work of Faraday; '" Aunt Chloe's Two Halle- 
luiahs," a tale of the Civil War, is the leading feature 
of the Aurora. From "The Lost Hellas" in the 
Spectrum we quote : 



" Her fanes are shattered and tier bards are dead, 

But like a flame from ruins, leaps tier glory 
Up from her sacred dust, its rays to shed 

On alien skies of art and song and story. 
Her spirits, rising from her temples hoary, 

Though barren climes dispersed has northward fled ; 
So, through the flower be dead, its breath may hover, 

A homeless fragrance sweet, the meadow over." 

Noteworthy articles in our other exchanges are as 
follows: " A Hostage to Fortune," Olympian; "The 
Little Path," "Tale of a Goose," and " Mr. Clayton's 
Departure," Holyoke Herald ; " Miss Olive's Clock," 
Pine Grove Echoes; "Kidnapped," Thistle; "A 
Treacherous Time-Table," Tabula; " The Walling- 
ford Prize," H. S. Bulletin; " John Ruskin," Distaff; 
"Through Hidden Waters," Oracle. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 



The New England Intercollegiate games will be held 
at Worcester the 19th of May. Every college in the 
association is represented by numerous entries. H.E. 
Maynard, M. A. C. '99, has been entered by Worces- 
ter Tech in the mile, half-mile and two-mile runs. 

At the recent U. of P. games, Prinstein of Syra- 
cuse broke the world's record for the broad jump 
making 24 ft., 7 1-4 in. A new record of 3 minutes, 
22 3-5 seconds in the one mile college champion- 
ship relay race was established by the University of 
Chicago. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The library now numbers twenty thousand, nine 
hundred volumes, showing an increase of over five 
thousand volumes during the past five years and it now 
stands as one of the best of its kind in this country. 
The library is purely for reference purposes and espec- 
ially for reference in the different branches of science. 
I doubt if a single subject, relating to science, could be 
mentioned but that something in regard to it could 
be found upon our shelves. Some of the works are 
written in the German and some in the French lan- 
guage, and so are of use only to a few. As a general 
rule the students do not realize the value of what they 
have at hand, they study the different subjects from 
the text-books used in the class-room and think no 
more about it, while often times another author may 
have a different method of explaining some matter, — 
especially is this true of mathematics. — which may be 
more easily comprehended. This is the purpose for 
which the library is intended and a larger proportion 
of the men ought to realize their advantages. New 



AGGIE LIFE. 



167 



volumes are continually being added so that the cata- 
logue is al ways up to date. The series on such sub- 
jects as Botany, Entomology, Horticulture, Agriculture 
and Dairying are the most nearly complete and some 
of these are exceedingly valuable. The purpose of these 
notes is to take up the new books as they are entered 
and try to give the reader an idea of the character of 
the work. Lack of space compels us to omit a great 
many volumes so that only a few of the most impor- 
tant are selected and a very short summary, so to 
speak, written. A book that has lately been added is : 
In Portia's Gardens, by William Sloane Kennedy. 
This is a work on Natural History and is a descrip- 
tion of animal, bird, and insect lives, as seen by the 
author and noted by him at the time. A high-wooded 
ridge, overlooking a valley crossed by brooks, and 
dotted here and there with farms, upon which is situ- 
ated a little red-gabled cottage, is the birthplace of all 
the different subjects. The ground is covered with a 
wild growth of cherries, mints, flowers, and ferns, 
which makes one think of the tropics. It is an ideal 
home for the woodchuck, fox, squirrels, birds and all 
such things. The notes were being collected through 
a long period of years and contains not only descrip- 
tions, habits and habitat of these small animals and 
birds but also of the insects such as ants and spiders. 
The illustrations were reproduced from photographs 
taken by a friend of the author. The descriptions are 
so clearly written that many will be able to identify 
different varieties of birds by these alone. The 
Appendix is devoted entirely to bird songs and calls. 
In the introduction the author says, " Let the initial 
chapter on sweet odors be as a grain of ambergris or 
musk, to perfume the whole, so that it may be said. 
The box-lid is but perceptibly open'd, nevertheless 
the perfume pours copiously out of the whole box." 



Al 



uirvni 



Alumni are earnestly requested to contibute to this 
column. All notices for publication will be most 
thankfully received. Communications should be 
addressed to the Alumni Editor. 

'89. — Dwight L. Hubbard, address. City Engineer's 
Office, City Hall, Boston, Mass. 

'89. — A. D. Copeland is a florist and market gard- 
ener in Campello, Mass. 



'90.— D. W. Dickinson, 419 Boylston St., Boston, 
Mass. 

Ex-'90.— L. C. Stillings, M. D.. 333 Walnut St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

'90.— W. E. Taft, 122 Peal St., Boston, Mass. 
Residence in Dedham. 

Following is a list of addresses for the class of 
1 392 taken from the class secretary's list ; if any changes 
are to be made please notify the Alumni Editor at once : 

A. T. Beals with Wells Bros. & Co., Greenfield, 
Mass. 

Dr. W. I. Boyntoh is with Dr. Morgan, office in 
Evans House, Springfield, Mass. Address, 365 Main 
St., Springfield. 

H. E. Crane, Quincy, Mass. 

J. E. Deuel, Apothecary, residence on Pleasant St., 
Amherst, Mass. 

H. B. Emerson, Schenectady, N. Y. 

J. L. Field, 3646 Lake Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

W. C. Fletcher, Chemsford, Mass. 

C. S. Graham, Westboro, Mass. 

E. B. Holland, Amherst, Mass. 

C. M. Hubbard, Sunderland, Mass. 

J. B. Knight, Graduate Student, M. A. C. 

Dr. K. P. Lyman, 328 Asylum St., Hartford. Conn. 

F. H. Blinn, Homestead Office, Springfield, Mass. 
Elliot Rogers, Kennebunk, Me. 

P. G. Stockbridge, Harrison, N. Y, 

G. E. Taylor, Greenfield, Mass. 
H. M. Thompson, Amherst, Mass. 
H. C. West, Waltham, Mass. 

G. B. Willard, Waltham, Mass. 

Dr. M. H. Williams, Sunderland, Mass. 

'93. — The. class of '93 will hold its second reunion 
Monday evening, June 18 at 8 p. m. at the Amherst 
house, Amherst. Mr. Charles A. Goodrich, presi- 
dent of the class, was recently in town making ar- 
rangements. It is hoped that every member of the 
class will keep the date in mind so that there may be 
a full representation at the supper. 

'95. — W. L. Morse is civil engineer on construction 
work with the New York, New Haven, and Hartford 
Railroad Company. 

'95. — Robert A. Cooley on March 19, became the 
happy father of a bouncing daughter, Charlotte Pack- 
ard Cooley. ^ 



1 68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'95. — H. D. Hemenway of the Horticultural depart- 
ment at the college is overseer of the W. E. Hemen- 
way estate at Wellingtonville. 

'95. — Herbert L. Fairbanks is travelling in Switz- 
erland as private tutor. 

'95. — The Life is pleased to announce the engage- 
ment of its former editor-in-chief, Clarence B. Lane, 
to Miss Nellie L. R. Lefferts of New Brunswick, N. 
J. Mr. Lane is now with the New Jersey Agricul- 
tural Experiment station as assistant in dairy hus- 
bandry. 

'96. — Henry Ward Moore and Miss Abigail D. 
Holley of Amherst were married at the home of the 
bride's mother, 203 South Pleasant St., Tuesday 
evening, May 1. Mr. and Mrs. Moore will reside at 
27 Amherst St., Worcester, Mass., where Mr. Moore 
is engaged with his father in the market gardening and 
dairy business. 

Ex-'96. — Herbert W. Rawson, with W. W. Rawson, 
seeds and agricultural implements, Faneuil Hall 
Square, Boston, Mass. 

'96. — W. B. Wentzell, Veterinary Surgeon, Bev- 
erly, Mass. 

'96. — -Wednesday, April 18, in Worcester, Mass., 
at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. William Lewis 
Pentecost was married to Miss Ida Kathrina Field. 
The couple will be at their home, Hubbardston, Mass., 
after October 1st. Mr. Pentecost has accepted the 
position of Farm Superintendent of the " Pinecroft 
Farm " Hubbardston, Mass, 

'96. — A. B. Cook has accepted a position with 
Olmstead & Eliot. He is employed on the grounds 
of Cheney Bros. , South Manchester, Conn. 

'96. — H. H. Roper has accepted a position as fore- 
man on the farm of Cheney Bros., South Manches- 
ter, Conn. 

'96. — S. W. Fletcher has recently published a 
bulletin from the Cornell University Experiment Station 
on " Pollination in Orchards." 

'97.— Prof. C. F. Palmer of the Mansfield State 
Normal School, Mansfield, Pa., recently addressed 
the Tioga County Teachers' Association at Coving- 
ton, Pa., on " Phases of nature study as related to the 
work of common schools." 

'97. — H. J. Armstrong is civil engineer on recon- 
struction work with the Illinois Central Railroad. 
Address, No. 2251 Calumet Ave. Chicago, 111, 



'97. — L. F. Clark is a student at the University of 
Wisconsin. Address, No. 921 University Ave., Madi- 
son, Wisconsin. 

'98.— Willis S. Fisher is Principal of the High 
School in Montgomery, Vermont. 

'99.— W. E. Chapin and A. A. Boutelle ex-'99 
have formed a company under the firm name of 
Chapin, Boutelle Co., Market Gardeners. Place of 
business Leominister, Mass. 

Ex-'OO. — A. D. Gile is with the Geo. Shame Co.. 
dealers in agricultural implements etc. Address, 
Ogden, Utah. 

The Rub Down 

Is as good as the exercise. Its good is 
doubled if you rub the tired muscles with 



Johnsons, 



Endorsed by leading instructors and i 

athletes in every line of sport. Ninety i 

years record for the cure of sprains, bruises, | 

and all inflammation. Sold by druggists, | 

Two size bottles— 25 cents or 50 cents. | 

I. S. JOHNSON & CO, Boston, Mass. I 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Marks 

Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
Bent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific JUnerican. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a 
year; four months, fl. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.36iBroadway. New York 

Branch Office, 626 F St.. Washington, D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remember these suits ».x& pressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in tbe latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHING CO., 
134 VanBuren St., Chicago. 



TEAOHERS WANTED! 

UNION TERGjiEHS' BI}E{iCIES OF JUnEQIGi!. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pil'sburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York,'Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be tilled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canaila. Principals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WilSHI[lGTON, D. C, 01' PITTSBOHG, Pfl. 




HALFJONEPt&TES.> 



Itj^ DESIGNING, ETC\^ 



%^i>y 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BEOWN, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



M. A. C. Students desirous of first class work at reasonable 
prices will find the following list of interest. 

Main Springs, $1.00, warranted one year. Cleaning, $1 to $2.50. 
Balance Staff, $1.50. 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL WGRK. 

Plain Gold Rings soldered, 25c. to 35c. Chased Gold Rings 
soldered, 26c. to 35c. Stone Rings, 50c. Gold Eye Glass or 
Specs soldered, 35c, Eye Glass Spring, gold filled, 35c. Eye 
Glass Springs, gold, 50c. Riding Bows, nickel, 25c. Riding 
Bows, gold filled, 50c. Jewelry Roman colored, 25c. Eye Glass 
and Spec Lenses, 25c. to $1.00. 

AH work sent by mail for repair returned the same day. 



Jeweler, Optician and Engfraver, 



27 Main St., 



Northampton, Mass, 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



AGtiiK L.lfhj. 



Start in Basiness for Yoarself . 



SUCCESS ASSUBED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



DARRAGH & RICH, 

5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. Tf?OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
Wm IH STOVES 6ND RflHGES. 

AGENT rOK THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

THlephone 564. 



C. R. ELDBR, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups^ &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 

^FASHIONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

l^ All suits made in my own work-shops. ^^J 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehusetts flgriealtopal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

PerdieroD Horses anil Soyioi Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIiE Lif'E. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 
MANUFACTUKER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RIVEK Stkeet, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. B. mCKINSDN, B. D. S. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHEKST, MASS. 



Office Hours: 

9 TO 12 A.. IvI., 1-30 TO 5 P. 1»I- 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVEBTBODT. 



■ A FINE LINE OP STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBEIS 0-003DS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



j^-Mepairing done while you wait,.Slg 
a PBCEKIX ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. Ii. FAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITY STREET, AMMERST, MASS. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 

, Caps, Gloves, Gents' 

FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Oixstonrx JVIa.cie Olot;tiing:. 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 



Co-Operative Steam Laundry 

and Carpet Renovating Establisliment 



^« 



■A-Srei^ A-geMit, 



H. Iv. 0*«;.A.IVEJ »00 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SS^cSA.'TISF.A.CTIOlSr GI-"Cr-A.Il.A.lTTBErJ. a>!S* 
OFFICE : 

Next Doob West op Amitt St. School House. 
ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



's 






Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants aud Banners. 

NEW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PRICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. B. KELTON. 



F. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POULTRY, VEUETHBLES, FISH m OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A.. J. ®onirvrv^^i«E:, 

108 Main Steeet, Noethampton, Mass. 

Telepliona connection. 



AI^MS«'®«'omi 




juf' Consider— If you can teep the wet out 
P of your rifle it will not riistooj/reeze. Only 

p Marlin Repeaters 

S have Solid Tops, Bhedding -water like a 
3 duck's back. Our 197-page book (just out) 
" tells all about them. Up-to-date Infor- , 
mation about powders,l)lack and smoke- y 



trajectories, TelocitieStPenetrations. All lii 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and ' * ' 
, 1,000 other things, includiag many trade 
■s? J, secrets never before given to the public. 
^;A Free if you will send stamps for postage to 
.' The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct 



mc: 



^^^^r'''<' 



The III. N. Spear Book Store. 



ESTABLISHED FIFTY YEAES. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. G. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

1= n o rr o a- 1^ -^ :e= n E 15 . 



Portrait and Group WorTc a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, ^2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made ou quantities. 
Studio, 17 Spring Street, - - ^STHERST, MASS. 



Hmberst Tbouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manager. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



DEALEK IN 



WftTGHES, GIiOGKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
"WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 



REPAIRING NEATL.Y AND RROMPTL.Y DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



we: MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The llorthampton M Store. 

I,. B. CHEW, Manager. 

CoE. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 



MASS.jlGRICULTUIiAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

"We would inform the friends of the college, and the publle 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHBRST, MASS. 



GLYNN, 



TAILOR.^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty, 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



■ t > :the:: < t ' 

/Iftassacbueetts 

Haticultural 

College 

• OFFERS • 

1. A SHORT WINTER COURSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST G-RABUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 



// /^L!^%/'^ 




\{ XT \C 







)L. X. 



NO. 15. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISHJrslOB 



"VVe sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because Ave sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest ot new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



> 

Annast, Aa$$. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hoffman House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



I^f?\ 



• ,^-JPm^^(iEir/e 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $3.^0. 
Pate7it Leathers, $2.§o to $j.oo. 



R EIPAI R S rsj O.^^^ 

New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 



Wedding and Engagement Rings 

in approved forms. 
PRICEIS RIQHnr. 



GOLLEE Bj 
JEWELEB Dl 



ITT 



COLLEGE 
JEWELEB 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

>8!S=-EYES FITTED FREE.=©8r 
By a graduate of Dr. Foster, Occulist. 




I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of . 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Ik' 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST, MASS.. MAY 30, 1900 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901, Athletics. JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1901, Library Notes. 

THOMAS CASEY, 1901, Alumni Notes. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Exchanges. 

CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, College Notes. ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 

CLIFFORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 

Terms: $1.00 per tjear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 

C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
J. C. Hall, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'to rials. 



The "Student Hand-Book" which is published 
annually by the Y. M. C. A. is now on our table. The 
little book presents a very neat and attractive appear- 
ance. An examination into its contents discloses a 
mine of valuable information well adapted to the pur- 
pose for which the book is designed. The editors are 
to be praised and thanked for their efforts, so success- 
fully carried out. 



In most every library of any size there is in vogue 
some system for the notification of those who are re- 
taining books beyond the allowed time. Such a sys- 
tem has many things to recommend it. Books that 
are in demand are brought in on time, thereby avoid- 
ing much inconvenience and delay. While a postal 
card system, such as that in most common use, is 
hardly necessary in our own library, yet some kind of 
a notice, if it be only a daily bulletin, would undoubt- 
edly meet with general approval. 



The complaint has been made by members of the 
baseball team that the team has not received proper 
support from the fellows. The apathy exhibited in 
mass meeting the other morning is reasonable proo' 
that there is very little whole-heartedness among us. 
The question of expediency which might have been 
discussed with perfect propriety at, one time has now 
no significance, or should have none, in our consider- 
ation of our position with reference to baseball. Here 
we are with a series of games all arranged. Shall we 
cancel those engagements because of lack of 
money? This question is put to those who have not 
paid their tax. A man who goes to college enters as 
a member of the student body ; he has a part and a 
responsibility in all enterprises of that body, a respon- 
sibility self-imposed the very moment tha^ he allies 
himself with the college. What shall be said of him 
if he fail to meet that responsibility ? Shell out with 
your money. When each student shall have made the 
determination that three dollars shall not stand in the 
way of M. A. C. athletics we shall have reached a 
secure footing, and more we shall have acted our part 



170 



AGGIE LIFE. 



like men. It is a small sacrifice. The man who 
will not make it, when it is possible for him to do so, 
is not acting faithfully towards his fellows. 



Those who were present at drill the other morning 
will remember the remarks of Mr. Golden who ad- 
dressed the students and complimented them upon the 
creditable appearance which they had made. There 
is an especial significance in what he said or better 
perhaps, in the circumstance of the visit of the people 
from Boston. In words resembling the following Mr. 
Golden addressed the students who were lined up be- 
fore the assembled visitors: " Students of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. Considering the short 
time which you have had for perfecting yourselves in 
drill, and considering the serious interruption that has 
occurred in your instruction in the last two years, it 
gives me great pleasure to express my gratification at 
the very creditable exhibition which you have given 
us this morning. You may feel sure that every mem- 
ber of the Legislature who has witnessed your per- 
formance this morning will remember it with pleasure, 
and that when it shall be in his power to vote an ap- 
propriation for the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
he shall not be found wanting." In the light of events 
like these the pathway of action that shall secure to 
the college that which it needs might seem clearly 
defined. What is the significance of a visit from the 
members of our General Court ? Here are men 
who represent different portions of the state, men, 
therefore, of broad influence, and those to whom the 
college must look for its support and ultimate success. 
It is of the utmost importance that these men carry 
with them a favorable impression of the college and 
its work. Anything which we may do to gain their 
recognition shall redound to our own glory and profit 
as an institution, for through them we may appeal to 
the people of the state, and through them, also, the 
people of the state may learn of the college of which 
they now know only too little. 



For the first time in we know not how many years 
there will be no fraternity banquets at Commence- 
ment. As the term is nearly ended it seems fitting 
that the matter be brought up for reconsideration inas- 
much as the first attempt at holding them in mid- 
winter resulted in such a dismal failure. The gradu- 



ate members of our fraternities are of course more 
deeply interested in the matter of annual fraternity 
banquets than are the undergraduates and their wishes 
should be consulted and if possible carried out. The 
object of these banquets should be to strengthen the 
bond of fraternal brotherhood among us, and it is very 
important that they be held at the time best fitted for 
bringing together the largest number. The holding of 
them in midwinter last was, of course, an experiment, 
and it is not impossible that another trial would result 
more satisfactorily. However, as the time for class 
reunions draws near some action should be taken with 
reference to learning the opinions and wishes of the 
alumni in a matter which must be left for them to 
decide. It is most probable that the alumni who at- 
tend the Commencement exercises are those who are 
most interested in the question. They will be com- 
petent to judge at that time whether or not they miss 
this feature of Commencement week. The Frater- 
nity Conference should meet and consider what may 
be done about the matter. If a committee be ap- 
pointed to go about the work in a systematic way it 
will be possible to secure a representative expression 
of opinion ; for it is the alumni who attend Com- 
mencement and who are therefore more likely to be 
present at the club banquets, whose opinions we should 
be most anxious to learn. It may seem wise to have 
a general conference, or better probably, to have the 
fraternities hold an informal discussion each for itself 
for the purpose of securing an expression of the wishes 
of its graduate members. Subsequently the reports 
could be made to the local Fraternity Conference. 
Something should be done, at any rate. The opinion 
is to a large extent prevalent that midwinter is not a 
propitious time for holding the annual banquets. The 
objection has been raised that during Commencement 
week there is too much going on for the enjoyment of 
any one thing. But this matter must be left for the 
alumni to decide. If they feel that they can come at 
Commencement and are willing to attend the ban- 
quets at that time while on the other hand if it is in- 
convenient to come in midwinter or if they feel that if 
they come then they cannot come again, much 
as they may wish to, at Commencement then, a 
majority vote of the alumni should settle the matter 
once for all. The alumni come prepared for the 
hurry and bustle of the graduation week. They ex- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



171 



pect that their time will be filled to overflowing, and 
they do not look forward to experiencing any incon- 
venience if their expectations prove true. The Fra- 
ternities have the maintenance of graduate fraternity 
interest to look out for, and it seems expedient that 
some effort be made to properly settle the matter 
before another winter. 



Stories, 



A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY. 

We were just in the midst of breakfast one morn- 
ing when the door opened and in rushed Charlie 
Hodgman with a dazed look on his face. 

"Hello, Charlie !" we shouted, "What's up, old 
man? seen a ghost?" 

"Ghost-yes-no-er-Say. Perley, what have you been 
doing to that room-mate of yours? He wasn't round 
to the reception last night, and just now when I asked 
him about it, he glared daggers, and vowed that the 
next man that mentioned the word 'reception' wonld 
die the death of a dog in short order. Anything 
serious is it, do you think?" 

"Oh, I guess he'll recover," answered Perley, with 
a ghastly smile, "We just had a little trouble in the 
family last night and relations are a little — well — 
strained. He takes it to heart a little that's all. He'll 
be all right in a week or so." 

"Well, what did you do to him? Find fault be- 
cause he was out so late? Mildly hint that so much 
study was bad for his system? Or was it some good 
advice on the gentler sex?" 

"No, you men are way off. Keep still, will you and 
let me talk. You see it was this way. Freddy is a 
good sort of fellow and all that, but he's got one 
mighty bad habit. He's got an idea that he's entitled 
to anything within reach whether he belongs to it or 
not. The result is that if you have anything you care 
about you either have to wear it yourself, or put it 
under lock and key. As a general thing you don't 
care a great deal, though you do like to have a chance 
to wear your own things once in awhile. And then 
again I never could appreciate Fred's wearing my 
patent leathers when it rained for the sake of saving 
his own, but that's probably because my sense of the 
humorous isn't fully developed. He seemed to think 
it was a big joke." 



"Well, why didn't you pitch into him about it, give 
him a piece of your mind, etc.?" 

"Pitch into him ! Well, I should say I did, — talked 
myself hoarse and him deaf, and that's all the good it 
did. All you could get out of him was 'Well, you 
know you can take anything of mine if you want to. 
I like to see a man with some accomodation about 
him.' I stood it as long as I could, but finally I was 
convinced that the hour for words was past and the 
time for action at hand. Things went from bad to 
worse, till yesterday the crash came. I went in at 
noon to find my glasses, hat, a necktie and a brand 
new pair cf gloves missing, while a recently borrowed 
razor and a box of shoe-blacking lay over on his side 
of the room where he had dropped them. I was mad 
clear through and just as my righteous wreath was at 
its highest point there came a knock at the door and 
in walked Henry, my elder brother, you know. He 
happened to be in the city for a day or so and when 
I told him about the Reception he wanted to go. The 
only hitch was that he didn't have his dress-suit with 
him. I was considering what I'd better do, when all 
of a sudden a brilliant idea struck me. Henry and 
Fred are built a good deal alike, same height and 
weight and so on. So what should I do but take 
advantage of Fred's little offers and rig Henry out in 
whatever I could find. 'Take anything you want, at 
any time' he had said, and so I did. I found pretty 
nearly a complete outfit, and what Henry didn't want 
1 used myself. Then I locked the rest of the things up 
and awaited developments. 

Fred didn't show up till after supper when we were 
all ready to go. Then he came in with a rush and a 
band. 'I've just fifteen minutes to get down on Whit- 
ney Avenue in' he remarked, throwing things right 
and left, 'and I see where I've got to hustle. Say, you 
don't care if I wear one of your collars to-night do 
you? I haven't any of mine back yet.' 

I pretended astonishment. 

' Are you going out to-night, Fred ?" I asked. 

' Am I ? Well, I should say so. Why I wouldn't 
miss that reception for a farm. Everybody's going to 
be there. Of course I'm going.' 

' Well, I'm sorry to hear it,' I replied. ' You 
hadn't said anything about it and I thought you were 
going to stay here and study.' 

' Stay here and study 1 Not if — Where in the 



172 



AGGIE LIFE. 



name of the six nations of tlie Penobscot is that dress- 
suit ? Confound the luck ! I can't put anything in 
this room and find it when I come in again. You 
haven't seen it, have you, Parley ?' 

I motioned to Henry to clear out, and beat a hasty 
retreat to the threshold. 

' Your dress-suit ? Why I was telling you. You 
remember you said I could take anything I wanted, 
and Henry didn't bring a suit with him, so I — ' 

'You took my dress-suit? You took — ' he fairly 
howled. 

• Sure. Wasn't that all right ? You can get an- 
other somewhere easy enough. You're not in any 
hurry, I believe ?' 

I closed the door just then. Something was com- 
ing my way — -I didn't wait to see what. I remem- 
bered I wanted to be on time at that reception. So 
I went a^ong, but I didn't see Fred — I suppose he 
changed his mind. He wouldn't discuss the matter 
this morning — simply gave me to understand that in 
the future he'd use his own things and I could use 
mine. Funny, how touchy some folks are about a 
little thing like that." 

" That's right. But you know you did rather rub 
it in. That girl he was to meet — " 

" Oh, she was there all the same. I-er-represented 
the case in its-er-proper light, and she — " 

" Added insult to injury, eh? Well, I don't won- 
der Fred isn't feeling well," said Hodgman as we rose 
from the table. And Perley was the only one who 
couldn't see why. 



OOLOGIST. 

"You must not climb that tree, Harold Foster." 
Dorothy Howard, her brother Ralph, and the latter's 
boon companion, Harold Foster, stood gazing skyward 
into the branches of a towering hemlock that grew 
from a huge crevice at their feet. Beneath them 
yawned a frightful chasm which some convulsion in 
prehistoric times had made in the mountain side. 
Dorothy was an enthusiastic oologist and the recog- 
nised leader of the party that now stood gazing so 
earnestly upward. A huge hawk's nest in the top- 
most branches of the hemlock had attracted Harold's 
attention, and the desire to secure the eggs which he 
felt sure were there had carried him beyond the point 
of discretion. 



" Now, why not ? " he asked. 

" Think if you should fall." 

" Fall 1 pooh, haven't I climbed higher trees than 
that?" 

" Yes, but your head spins round like a top, you say, 
every time you climb an ordinary tree ; with that 
great black abyss ready to swallow you up you will 
surely get dizzy and fall. I say you must not climb 
that tree," she added with considerable vehemence, 
stamping her tiny foot upon the rock, emphatically. 

Harold smiled defiantly ; Ralph shook his head ; 
Dorothy turned her face away to hide a look of pain. 
When she turned Harold had stripped off his coat 
and was started up the tree. His climbing strap lay 
upon the ground. 

" Why didn't you take the strap with you ? You 
might have used it if you got dizzy," Dorothy called. 

Harold did not reply. He had purposely left the 
strap behind him. Dorothy's interference had piqued 
him ; he would show that he was not afraid. Never 
before had he failed to take the precaution. Dorothy 
became all the more alarmed when she saw how 
reckless he had been. 

" Oh, why did we let him go ?" she said to Ralph. 

" Well, 'taint likely I could have stopped him if you 
couldn't," Ralph replied, rather indifferently. 

Ralph was busy at the foot of the tree. A cry 
from Dorothy drew his attention. She stood with her 
hands clasped ; her face was blanched, while she 
trembled like a leaf. 

" What's the matter?" he cried, thoroughly scared, 
and hardly knowing what to think as he hurried to his 
sister's side. 

"Oh, look!" was all she said, pointing upward. 

The sight that met his eyes made his heart sick 
within him. Harold had reached the nest in safety, 
but on looking downward at his companions below he 
had become helplessly dizzy, and would have fallen 
had not a protecting branch, more crooked than its 
companions, intervened and saved him. There he lay 
in mid air supported only by the frail bough that 
threatened to break at any moment, while his hands 
feebly clasped the trunk of the tree. It was in this 
position that Dorothy had discovered him. The 
thought of his awful danger, had quite unnerved the 
courageous girl. Powerless to help him Ralph stood 
at his sister's side and watched his friend. As though 



AGGIE LIFE. 



173 



he realized his danger, by a mighty effort, Harold 
swung hinnself around to the other side of the tree 
and away from the dangerous chasm. But his strength 
soon failed him and having lost the support which the 
branch had afforded he lost his hold and fell, crashing 
through the thickly-growing branches of the hemlock. 
Striking the hard rock near the brink of the chasm, in 
another second he would have plunged into its awful 
depths had not Ralph and his sister rushed forward 
and pulled him back. Dorothy who had been stand- 
ing spellbound and utterly helpless at the sight of 
Harold's perilous position had been awakened to a 
sense of his greater danger as he fell at her feet. 
Together they carried him to a mossy spot, and placed 
him on a carpet of needles beneath some pines that 
grew farther up the mountain side. As they laid him 
down, pale and limp, and turned his white face to the 
light Dorothy gave way. 

" Oh, is he dead?" she asked.- 

Ralph had loosened Harold's shirt and was holding 
his ear at his breast. 

" No," he replied, " his heart still beats, but I guess 
he is pretty badly hurt." 

" Oh, that we ever let him climb the tree," she 
said. 

"I know it," replied Ralph, "but he would go. 
However, we must begin to think of getting him 
home, Dorothy, it will never do to let him lie here. 
He needs a doctor's care." 

Dorothy thought for a moment. " There is a 
farmhouse only a short way round the mountain," 
she said ; " I will go and see if I can get help." 

She hurried away and in the course of an half 
hour returned with a farmer whom she found plough- 
ing in a field near the house. 

" Why, isn't this Harold Foster?" the farmer asked 
when he had carefully looked at the unconscious lad. 

"Yes," replied Dorothy, greatly surprised, "do 
you know him ?" 

" Oh, yes indeed," replied the farmer, " my wifd is 
his aunt and many a summer has he spent on the 
farm. He seems pretty badly shaken up by his fall," 
he continued, as he stooped and felt Harold's pulse. 
" I guess we'd better take him right over to the house 
where his aunt will make him nice and comfortable 
till we can get a doctor." 

The farmer having taken Harold in his strong 



arms the party set out for the farmer's home. 

***** 

When thou, O sunshine of my heart, 

Art near. 
Dark thoughts, and gloomy, grim despair, 
Which found a welcome lodging 
Like shadows of wind driven smoke. 
Do fly away and disappear ; 
So come again my love, nor stay away, 
For thou, indeed, hast welcome here. 
In this sad heart so lone and drear, 
And filled with meditating fear 
Till thou, O sunshine of my life. 

Art near. 

A week passed by and with it Harold's birthday. 
Twenty summers had come and gone. But on the 
anniversary day Harold still lay unconscious. Another 
week flew by and on a beautiful Sabbath morning in 
early June he awoke to consciousness. He heard the 
lowing of the cattle as they passed by his windows 
bound for the pasture. What strange room was this 
in which he found himself. How pleasant the sun- 
shine as it streamed in through the eastern window ! 
How sweetly the oriole sang in the pear tree which he 
saw by the pasture gate ! How quiet, and restful the 
summer morning scene. Across the valley the mist 
was rolling away before the rising sun. The serenity 
of it all sank deep into his heart. 

" Where am I ?" he asked himself. 

There was a noise without, and somebody who had 
been sitting just outside the chamber door rose and 
came into the room. 

" Why. Aunt Nettie !" Harold exclaimed, " when 
did you come ?" 

•' Oh, I have been here two or three weeks." 

" And mother, where is she ?" 

"She went home last night but expects to return 
to-night." 

" Went home ?" exclaimed Harold, " why, aren't 
we at home ?" 

"You are on the mountain, Harold, on the farm ; 
but you mustn't talk my dear, or you'll be sick again." 

"And I have been ill," continued Harold' stroking 
his forehead as though trying to recall the past, " how 
long have I been ill. Auntie ?" 

" Oh, a little while ; but you mustn't talk anymore. 
To-morrow you will know all." his aunt replied. 

So Harold lay back on the pillow as his aunt bade 



174 



AGGIE LIFE. 



him. As the day wore away the past came back to 
him. He thought himself in the tree again. He 
grew dizzy and faint ; the chasm yawned beneath 
him. He thought himself falling and cried out in 
terror. His aunt hurried to his bedside. 

" What's the matter, Harold ?" she inquired. 

" I thought myself falling from the tree again," 
Harold replied, " and I thought I heard Dorothy cry 
out. Where is she ?" 

" She called yesterday to see you and said she 
would come again soon. She has come very often to 
inquire how you were." 

" Did she say that she would come to-day?" he 
asked. 

" She did not say when," his aunt replied, smiling, 
" but perhaps she will or if not perhaps to-morrow. 
Wouldn't you like to have me read to you?" 

" Oh, } wish you would," Harold replied. His aunt 
left the room but returned immediately with a copy of 
" Richard Carvel." 

" I thought perhaps you would like to hear of 
Dorothy," she said, holding the book where Harold 
could see its title. 

Harold blushed, but said that he would, and lay 
back on the pillows as his aunt began to read. The 
day was warm, the air mellow. Through the open 
windows the fragrance from the hayfield made its 
way like an incense. Harold soon fell asleep and 
his aunt closing the book left the room. 

Harold lay with his head near an open window. 
He awakened as the sun was setting; the cattle had 
come down from the hills and were lazily chewing 
their cuds near the bars. Folding his pillow he lay 
and dreamed. 

Dorothy who had called while he was asleep sat 
near the door. When she saw him arrange his pillow 
she rose and stealing silently over to where he lay 
placed her hands playfully over his eyes. 

" Who's that ?" asked Harold, suspecting at once 
that it was Dorothy. 

" Guess," she replied, trying to disguise her voice. 

" Well, I shouldn't be surprised if it was Dorothy 
Howard," Harold replied, grasping her wrists at the 
same time, and pulling her around in front of him. 

" Let me go," she commanded. 

'• Never, I never shall," Harold replied. 

" I hoped to find you more submissive to-day," said 



Dorothy, struggling to free herself. 

" But I'm not." 

" That's very evident. But now I want to know 
what made you persist in climbing that tree when I 
told you not to ?" 

" Well, Dorothy, my dear, you know ' fools rush in 
where angels fear to tread '." 

" Oh, let me go." 

" Yes, pretty soon, but not until I've told you some- 
thing, Dorothy dear," Harold replied. 



Y. M. C. A. SECRETARY. 

In most colleges of note a branch of the Y. M. C. 
A. is a flourishing organization that contributes much 
to the welfare of the institution and adds greatly to the 
happiness of the students. In 1887 the Y. M. C, A. 
of the M. A. C. was organized. For thirteen years 
this association has maintained itself and has done a 
good work in promoting the social and moral and re- 
ligious life of the students. It has conducted classes 
in Bible study, and maintained prayer and conference 
meetings on Sundays and during the week. It has 
held many special meetings and secured addresses 
from many men of note, among them Henry Drum- 
mond. The custom of giving an annual reception to 
the freshman class and to the faculty and members 
of the college not belonging to the association, has 
been of value in acquainting students with each other 
and with the families of the faculty. The influence 
of the association has always been a power for good 
in athletics, in scholarship, in student life. Before it 
the annual address at Commencement is delivered 
affording the college an opportunity of hearing a num- 
ber of distinguished orators and educators. 

The fact that ours is a State College, located on 
a farm apart from the village, isolated from social 
privileges, the families of the professors living most ot 
them a mile distant, makes the work of this Y. M. 
C. A. peculiarly valuable. Without it we should all 
suffer a great loss. It should therefore continue to 
have, as in the past, the hearty support of faculty and 
students, of the alumni and of all friends of the College. 

Following the example of other associations, our 
Y. M. C. A. has voted to appoint a secretary. Mr, 
W. E. Hinds, B. Sc, of the class of 1899, who is 
pursuing a graduate course for the degree of Ph. D., 
a naan well fitted for the work, has been elected to 



AGGIE LIFE. 



175 



fill the position. To him will be assigned the direc- 
tion of the various committees. He will have charge 
of the Bible study, look after the entering classes, 
seek to interest new men in the work, and in every 
way in his power promote the growth and best interests 
of the association. He will not relieve members of 
their work, but will lead them to do more work and 
to do it more efficiently. 

To make the most of Mr. Hinds' services the Asso- 
ciation has agreed to pay him a small stipend so that 
it may command more of his time. To raise the 
sum needed the members will tax themselves and 
contribute liberally. But they will need the assistance 
of others, among alumni and faculty and students, 
who will be asked to help those who help themselves 
and devote themselves to the work of promoting the 
physical, social, moral and spiritual welfare of their 
Alma Mater. 

C. S. W. 



SENIOR COURSES. 

1. Agriculture, Political Economy, Veterinary. 

2. Agriculture, Chemistry, German. 

3. Botany, Chemistry, Veterinary. 

4. Horticulture, Entomology, Agriculture. 

5. Chemistry, Astronomy and Geology, Horticulture. 

6. Entomology, Botany, German. 

7. Political Economy, English, History. 

8. Mathematics, Engineering, Political Economy. 
9" Veterinary, Chemistry, German. 

10. English, Latin, Mathematics. 

11. Botany, Horticulture, English. 



Th^ Mirror. 



Many people do not believe in fate, and some are 
skeptical as to all premonitions concerning the future. 
Not so with Monsieur Du Miroir. Said that gentle- 
man to me one day as we sat gazing fondly at each 
other : " I had a dream the other night, Pierre. I 
dreamed that I should die ere long ; that my body 
should be exposed to the unremitting fury of the 
storm, and to the scorching heat of the sun while men 
should rudely sport with the fragments of my former 
self. Ah Pierre, it was a fearful dream !" and as my 
friend uttered these words he shuddered, grew pale, 
and fainted. We brought him to at last by dint of much 



dousing which might never have ceased had we not 
felt a fear of drowning our friend. Such a bedraggled 
looking specimen was he when we had finished that I 
laughed in spite of myself. My friend who was very 
sympathetic put on such a happy look when I gazed 
at him and smiled so radiantly back at me that I could 
not refrain from extending my hand. But how 
cold and glassy his felt 1 With great effort I still tried 
to laugh but with such ill success that poor Du Miroir 
discovered the sham and gave me a ghastly grin in 
return. As the day wore on my friend recovered to 
some extent his poise and natural jollity and we con- 
versed freely as before. But I could see that a cloud 
hung over my friend's mind and when he bade me 
goodnight it was with a pathos that touched my heart. 
I went away with vague, unhappy thoughts of what the 
morrow or the future might bring forth of weal or woe 
for poor Du Miroir. Strange, uncanny dreams dis- 
turbed my slumbers that night. Among the pictures 
that I saw was one which I shall never forget. Poor 
Monsieur Du Miroir lay upon the ground. It was in 
the dead of night. Strange, fantastic figures in gro- 
tesque costumes witches, in gown and cowl, gray- 
haired and long-bearded men, danced round the dis- 
membered body of my friend. The weird, lurid light 
of torches mingled with the moon's pale beams shone 
over all. Suddenly the torches went out and for a 
moment the moon disappeared behind a cloud. 
When it re-appeared the ghostly party had gone and 
on the ground lay what was mortal of my friend, Du 
Miroir. And then in the silence of the night, min- 
gled with the whistling of the wind, I heard these 
words : " Un faux pas," and then a jumble which was 
wholly unintelligible. 

Ye skeptics who scorn the idea of premonition of 
the future, who wear a sage and impressive look when 
such things are mentioned, listen to my story. 

On the following morning I called on Monsieur Du 
Miroir to inquire concerning his health and state of 
mind. I found him somewhat refreshed, as I thought, 
after the night's rest. " Will you take a walk with me 
this beautiful morning?" I asked. He said that he 
would, so we set out at once. We had not gone far 
when over my mind came the recollection of my 
dream. I shuddered and fearful lest my friend should 
see my uneasiness I turned to watch him. 

Unhappy world 1 His own face was the picture of 



176 



AGGIE LIFE. 



fright and despair. He trembled and would have 
fallen but I seized him, and as he was not very large 
I tucked him under my arm. I could feel him shudder 
and his terror communicated itself to me. We were 
near the chapel now, and on our left, high in the air, a 
white, slender pole towered to the heavens. Ah me, 
it is a strange and sorrowful story, and who will be- 
lieve it ? As 1 turned my friend's face to the light 
that I might see it better I saw a strange reflection in 
his eyes which were wide open and bulging with hor- 
ror. Against the heaven's blue on the high pinnacle 
of the flag-pole where old glory should have waved 
loomed an ugly shape. Du Miroir signified that he 
would speak and at a sign from him I held my ear 
near his mouth. " Pierre," he said, " my dream has 
come to pass ; tell them that the shock was too great. 
Pierre, you remember what Holmes says : 
' /^y, tear her tattered ensign down ! 

Long has she waved on high, 
And many an eye has danced to see 

That banner in the sky.' " 
And then he seemed to speak to an imaginary audi- 
ence: 

" Oh boys that you should have done this, 
" Insult and mock your country's flag 

And hang there in the sky 
An ugly barrel in its stead 

To shock the passer-by." 
As he said these words my friend uttered a pro- 
found sigh, his bosom heaved with great emotion and 
with one long last gasp, rent by the strength of his own 
feeling, the shattered fragments of all that was mortal 
of poor Du Miroir fell at my feet. Yes there lay Du 
Miroir, for I had stumbled and those prophetic words. 
" Un faux pas " had been fulfilled. 



Colle^^ No-t^S- 



— Ten minutes extra drill ! 

— Bridgeforth, 1901, has just recovered from the 
measles. 

The summer time-table of the electric road has 
gone into effect. 

— The Senior class flower bed has received its 
1900 decoration. 

— Dr. C. Wellington will study in Germany during 
the summer, sailing June 19th, 



— Dr. Walker will deliver the Baccalaureate ser- 
mon on Commencement Sunday. 

— Prof. Brooks attended the Unitarian conference 
in Boston on Monday and Tuesday. 

— Prof. Ostrander will occupy the house on Pleas- 
ant street where Capt. Wright formerly lived. 

— Knight, 1902, has been in Boston as delegate 
for tne Young Peoples' Religious Union of the Unity 
church. 

— That the troublesome epidemic of measles is not 
over is shown by the several cases in College. Rich- 
ardson 1903 is now a victim. 

— Those desiring hacks at Commencement will 
please confer with Neil F. Monahan, 1903, room 20, 
tower, on or before the 16th of June. 

— Dr. C. A. Goessmann and family, who have been 
in Germany about a year, have started for America, 
leaving Bremen some days ago. It is expected that 
they will reach here Thursday or Friday. 

— The Senior division in Chemistry spent Saturday 
in looking over several chemical industries. Among 
these were : The Springfield breweries and gas 
works, the Holyoke paper-mill, and the pulp-mill at 
Mount Tom station. 

— At the competitive speaking of the freshman and 
sophomore tens Friday afternoon the following men 
won places on the Commencement stage : Sopho- 
mores, Blake, Dacy, Hall, Knight ; substitutes. West, 
McCobb. Freshmen, Franklin, Peebles, O'Hearn, 
Webster ; substitutes, West, Proulx. 

— The College Y. M. C. A. has voted to secure 
the services of a secretary who shall receive a salary 
and have entire charge of the work of the Associa- 
tion. To fill this position they have chosen W. E. 
Hinds, '99, now taking a post graduate course. Mr. 
Hinds will enter upon his duties next September. 

— For class-day exercises the Seniors have elected 
the following men for the various offices : Ivy poem, 
Y. H. Canto ; class poem, M. B. Landers ; pipe ora- 
tion, J. W. Kellogg ; class oration, A. W. Morrill ; 
campus oration, A. C. Monahan ; hatchet oration, A. 
A. Harmon ; class song, P. F. Felch. Class-day will 
be Tuesday, June 1 9. 

— On Friday, May 18th, a party consisting of sev- 
eral members from the General Court and a number 



AGGIE LIFE. 



177 



of ladies inspected the College. As usual they ar- 
rived in time for chapel where, after devotional exer- 
cises, they were addressed by the President, As is 
the custom all class exercises were suspended for the 
day. After chapel the battalion went through some 
drill manoeuvres on the campus for the benefit of the 
visitors. The guests then drove about the grounds, 
visiting the principal points of interest. The day was 
fine and all that could be desired. The party, how- 
ever, having failed to send a proper notification of 
their intended visit had but a very informal reception, 
as the President did not learn of their arrival until 
Friday morning. 

—The people of Amherst and the faculties of the 
colleges have procured the charter necessary to es- 
tablish a country-club in this town. For a long time 
the want of such an organization has been felt and it 
is now about to be filled. The primary reason for its 
existence will be to promote the cause of physical, 
out-of-door exercise, which is so essential in an edu- 
cational town. The club has secured the Lincoln 
property south of the Boston and Maine station. A 
large house, an ideal country-seat, is on a knoll of the 
grounds which will be in the constant care of an at- 
tendant. Perhaps the chief feature of the club will 
be the golfing. An excellent course has been al- 
ready carefully laid out. The initiation fee will be 
five dollars, and the dues thereafter five dollars a 
year. A number of students have already joined, and 
it is hoped that many more will avail themselves of 
this opportunity. 



/Athletic NoH:ts- 



On Friday of last week Aggie had a practice 
meet with Amherst on Pratt Field. There was a 
strong wind blowing so the time in all running events 
was a bit slow. In the hundred yard dash none of 
the Aggie men qualified and owing to the wind the 
time was very slow, the best being eleven seconds. In 
the quarter-mile Chickering ran well and secured 
third place. Claflin was the only man entered in the 
high hurdles, he was a bit out of form, however, and 
came third to the tape. The half mile was a slow 
race but no Aggie man got a place, Wilson being the 
only one to finish. Landers slowed up very well in 



the pole vault and high jump. In the pole vault he 
tied for second place and landed first in the high 
jump, not being pushed at all, the highest height being 
five feet, two and one half inches. Higgins showed 
surprising speed in the two-twenty yard run, doing the 
last half of the sprint without his spikes and finishing 
third. In the weights our men disappointed us a bit, 
Cooke being the only man to land anything better 
than third, he taking second in the shot. Stanley 
landed third in the hammer and Graves got third in 
the discus. 

Aggie 1 , Bowdoin 0. 
On Friday May 18, Aggie won a well-played, five 
inning game from Bowdoin by the above score. The 
game was called at the end of the first half of the 
six inning on account of rain which came at the most 
inopportune moment. It was throughout a pitchers' 
battle, but Bodfish had the better of it, Bowdoin getting 
but one hit while Aggie hit for three bases. Aggie's 
scoring was done in the first inning. O'Hearn getting 
his base on a bunt, and was advanced to second by 
Grave's sacrifice. Halligan then went to bat and 
knocked a hot ball to the second baseman who failed 
to stop it, and O'Hearn scored. The next man struck 
out which retired the side and ended the scoring for 
both sides. The features of the game were the fast 
work of our in-field and the work of Bowdoin's short- 
stop. 







B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Paul. s. 







1 


1 





O'Hearn, 3, 




2 


1 








GravES, 1 . 







6 


1 





Haligan, 2. 
Hinds, 1. 







2 


2 


2 
















Cook, m. 




1 











Pierson, r. 













1 


Henry, c. 







4 








Bodfish, p. 







1 


2 


1 




Totals 


3 


15 


6 


4 




BOWDOIN. 














B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E 


Harkin, 3. 
















Clark, s. 







1 


2 





Pratt, r. 




1 











Neves, 1. 







2 








Bacon 1 . 







7 








Quinn, 2. 







1 


3 


1 


Craine, c. 







3 








Crawford, p. 










2 





Dana. m. 







1 










Totals 


1 


15 


7 


1 


Innings 


1 


2 3 


4 5 






M. A. C. 


1 





0- 


-1 





Run made by O'Hearn. Three-base hit— Pratt. Sto'en base — Halligan. 
Base on balls— off Crawford. Double play — Paul to Halligan, to Graves, to 
Henry. Hit by pitched ball — Bodfish 2. Umpire— C. M. Crapo. Time — 
Ih 15m. Struck out— by Bodfish 3, by Crawford. 



178 



AGGIE LIFE. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR SEASON OF 1900. 

Sept. 22. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Sept. 29. Open date. 

Oct. 6. Norwich Univjrsity at Amherst. 

Oct. 13. Wesleyan at Middletown. 

Oct. 17. Williams at Williamstown. 

Oct. 20. Trinity at Hartford. 

Oct. 27. Vermont University at Burlington. 

Nov. 3. Storrs at Amherst. 

Nov. 10. Worcester Tech. at Worcester. 

Nov. 17. Amherst on Pratt Field. 



C^cK^^nies. 



Which is preferable, the simple enumeration of 
Exchanges received or an attempt to criticize every 
one? The latter way seems idle, for what satisfac- 
tion can an Exchange editor derive from such a no- 
tice as the following: 

" We have received our first copy of the Spectrum, 
Fargo, N. D. We are glad to make your acquain- 
tance. Come again." 

By actual count there are in the April number of 
The Lake Breeze, sixty paragraphs in the Exchange 
column of which the above is a very good example. 
Such little cards of thankful appreciation may gratify 
a thirst for fame or recognition in the breast of some 
modest but aspiring genius, but to the thoughtful edi- 
tor they mean little or nothing. To come back to 
our question as to which is preferable, a simple ac- 
knowledgement of the receipt of an Exchange or an 
attempt to give it a superficial examination, we would 
say that the former is by far the better plan. How 
ever, in either case the department is not accom- 
plishing anything which justifies its existence, for the 
purpose of an Exchange department is priniarily that 
of criticism. Its success and usefulness are to be 
measured by the influence it .exerts in this field. 
* * * * * 

When an Exchange editor attempts to classify his 
Exchanges he finds that it may be most satisfactorily 
done by separating them according to the grade of 
the schools which they represent. The high school 
paper will possess its distinguishing characteristics, the 
academy or preparatory school papers will have their 
distinctive features, and of course we should expect to 
find the representative publications of our technical 



schools and our colleges to differ more or less from 
those of either high school or academy. Again, 
among college papers there may be a further division 
into those representing the larger and the smaller col- 
leges, while it goes without saying that there is a 
necessary difference between the student papers of 
Mt. Holyoke and Smith and those of Amherst or Wil- 
liams, and that by no means on the ground of relative 
excellence, but rather from the very nature of the 
case. It makes a very interesting study to group the 
papers in this manner and then to compare them. 
The differences in members of the same group, If 
there be any. are more easily seen and defined, and 
consequently the weak and strong points are more 
easily pointed out. Further, if there be any superi- 
ority in college papers over those of preparatory schools 
a systematic plan of study of this kind should furnish 

suggestions to thoughtful editors. 

***** 

"The Certificate System" is discussed in the 
Latin and High School Review in a plain, matter-of- 
fact way. We recommend the article to those inter- 
ested in the matter. The writer speaks of different 
phases of College entrance requirements in a way to 
bring out many points that must have suggested them- 
selves to most everyone interested in college prepara- 
tory study. 

***** 

The May number of the Mount Holyoke contains a 
pleasing story entitled "The Cross" The verse en- 
titled "In the Twilight" is especially good. The 
author not only has a beautiful thought, but she has 
also chosen appropriate language and a happy metre 
for its expression. 

***** 

Extract from "A May Legend" in the May number 
of the Purple: 

" The twilight deepens into shade 
And no one is left save a little maid, 
Who pra>s to our Lady morn and night 
For her robber father's woeful plight, 
William the Thief is the name of fear 
To village swain and mountaineer ; 
But Rose is the gentlest maid of all 
Who comes to our Lady's Festival, 
She prays to our lady to move and win 
Her father from bitter shame and sin. 

A man has entered the chapel door. 
Noiseless he steps on the sacred floor. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



179 



Noiseless he seizes the gifts of gold 

Which holy pilgrims left of old, 

When lo 1 in the mingled light and shade 

He sees the form of the little maid. 

The lamp light plays on her sunny hair, 

And her lips are moving in silent prayer. 

He leaves the gifts of silver and gold 

Which holy pilgrims offered of old. 

He passes again through the' chapel door 

And William the Thief is a thief no more." 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Some of the Scientific books that have lately been 
entered are as follows : 

Geological Biology by Henry Shaler Williams. 
This is an introduction to the geological history of 
organisms and was originally written in the form of 
lectures for Cornell University. Afterwards these 
were revised and put in the present form. The book 
is suited both for students in colleges and universities 
who have begun to appreciate the importance of 
understanding the principles of the nature and history 
of organisms as a part of a liberal education, and for 
the general reader who is supposed to know something 
of the present popular theories regarding organic life. 
The author says that, "The book is not intended to 
be a complete treatise on paleontology. It is rather a 
reconnaissance of a fascinating region, from which the 
few explorers, who have already penetrated it, have 
brought back accounts of the most wonderful and 
unexpected discoveries." There is but very little 
language that approaches the technical in the book 
which is a decided advantage in many ways and 
makes the production more nearly sure of a success- 
ful run. There have been many books written on 
this subject but each one is more nearly complete 
than any before and every new one has something 
new of interest to present to the reader or student. 

A Student's Text-book of Zoology by Adam Sedg- 
wick. This treats the subject of Zoology in a Way 
very much after the manner of Huxley. The one 
principal idea that the author seems to have is that 
the student of Zoology should begin by making a 
thorough examination of individual animals, of their 
structure, of the functions of their parts, of their rela- 
tions to the external world and to each other. The 
work is in two volumes only one of which has as yet 
been published. The first volume takes up the 
orders and classes of the animal kingdom from 



Phylum Protozoa to Phylum Chstognatha. So far 
as it goes it is very complete, especially in the minor 
details. To make the work complete for reference 
the author has described and classified as many fam- 
ilies as possible and mentioned many names without 
accompanying them with descriptions. This enables 
the student more easily to trace unknown names to 
the place where they belong in the system. The 
book is well illustrated on all the principal points and 
many of the illustrations are new. 

Vertebrate Zoology by J. S. Kingsley, pro fessor 
of Zoology at Tufts college. The intention of the 
author is to have the book used as a supplement both 
to lectures and laboratory work, it will also be of 
value to medical students. The first part of the vol- 
ume is an outline of the morphology of vertebrates. 
The remainder of the volume presents an outline of 
the classification of Vertebrates. Both fossils and 
existing forms are included. The explanations and 
descriptions are well illustrated by many original cuts 
and drawings. The language used is clear and con- 
cise. 

Syllabus of Lectures on Vertebrata by Edward D. 
Cope. As an introduction a short account of the life 
of Cope is given, written by Henry Fairfield Osborn. 
Professor Cope began his work in the year 1859 and 
died in 1 897 leaving the larger part of his labors in- 
complete. The most conspicuous feature of his 
character as a man, prominent even from his boyhood 
days, was independence and this is the secret of his 
success in his chosen work. Although leaving much 
incomplete what results he did give us are invaluable 
to the world of science. H is book was originally designed 
for use in the Extension Lectures of the University of 
Pennsylvania. It is based upon original research on 
the recent and extinct forms with the exception of the 
part relating to the birds. The book is an attempt to 
bring the characters of the different divisions of Ver- 
tebrata into prominence. It is not long but fully illus- 
trated and makes quite interesting reading. 

Mammalian Anatomy by Horace Jayne. The 
nature of the work can best be explained by quoting 
these words of the author, " This volume is the first 
of a series which aims to present a more accurate 
and more comprehensive description of the structure 
of a typical mammal than has hitherto been 
attempted." This first volume is a comparison of 
the skeleton of the cat, its muscular attachments, 



i8o 



AGGIE LIFiE. 



growth and variation with the skeleton of man. It 
consists of a systematic study of every bone in the 
cat's skeleton and of the regions v/hich they form 
when joined together and the comparing of them with 
the corresponding bones in the human skeleton. Even 
the very minute details are taken up and discussed 
with great care which of necessity makes the work 
exceedingly long and valuable only for reference and 
study. 



umni 



Alumni are earnestly requested to contribute to this 
column. All notices for publication will be most 
thankfully received. Communications should be ad- 
dressed to the alumni editor. 

The class of 1890 will hold its second reunion at 
the home of David Barry on Pleasant St., Amherst, 
Mass. It is hoped that all the members will be 
present. 

'90.— W. E. Taft, Berlin, New Hampshire. 



THE GHAHAi SHOE! 

All Up-to-date Shoes for College Men. Onr 
representative 

HARRY L. MANNING, 

■will be at Chapel moms every few weeks. 

G^flHAjW SHOE CO., 



280 Washington St., 



Boston, Mass. 



The class of 1892 will hold their third reunion at 
the Amherst house, on Monday of Commencement 
week. About twenty are expected to be present. 

Ex-'96. — J. Elton Green, with Burbank & Co., 
wholesale produce dealers, Worcester, Mass., near 
Union station. 

'99. — F. H. Turner with Piatt and Turner, hard- 
ware dealers. Great Barrington, Mass. 

Ex-'OO. — A. D. Gile is with the George A. Lowe 
Co. and not with the Geo. Shame Co. as incorrectly 
published in our last Issue. 



I Whether you take a spin for fuu 

I Or hump yourself on a century run, 

You won't get sore and tired and stiff 

Or say, next day, you're "dov.e up" — IF 

You soothe 5'onr muscles iiud oil your 

joints with 




Older than the history of athletics in 
Ameiica, it has been a favorite from the first. 

1 11 1 vo size bottles, 25 cents and 50 cents. I 

I. S. JOHNSON &. CO., Boston, Kflass. i 
— " ™* " '^w ■ M i"." u i'i»iii. nf .i ii i II I 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch Bnd description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
Bent free. Oldest agency for securingpatents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jltttcrican. 



A handsomely Illustrated weekly. 



Largest dr- 
Terms, $3 a 



culation of any scientific Journal. 

year ; four months, %l. Sold byall newsdealers. 

MUNNJCo.36'Broadway.(iewYork 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-zvork a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Eemember these suits 2.xepressed not sponged or burned. 

POWERS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing-, Cleaning- and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg-'s Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Wc Help Students through College 

by eiving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand- 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLISHINQ CO.. 
134 Van Buren St. , Chicago. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



UNION TEFiGHEeS' fl§E)IGlES OF PEQ1G9. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pilisburg, Toronto, Ne-w Orleans, 'Sew York, 'Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filJed. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqualified facilities for placing teachers in every part 
of the United States and Canada. I^rincipals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WflSHlHQTOH, D. C, OF PITTSBURG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S, 

E. K. BKOWK, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Etlier and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



M. A. C. Students desirous of first class work at reasonable 
prices will find the following list of interest. 

Main Springs, tl.OO, warranted one year. Cleaning, $1 to $2.50. 
Balance Staff, $1.50. 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL WORK. 

Plain Gold Rings soldered, 25c. to 35c. Chased Gold Rings 
soldered, 25c. to 35c. Stone Rings, 50c. Gold Eye Glass or 
Specs soldered, 35c. Eye Glass Spring, gold filltd, 35c. Eye 
Glass Springs, gold, 50ci Riding Bows, nickel, 25c. Riding 
Bows, gold filled, 60c. Jewelry Roman colored, 25c. Eye Glass 
and Spec Licnses, 25c. to $1.00. 

All work sent by mail for repair returned the same day. 



Jeweler, Optician and Engraver, 



27 Main Ht., 



Northatnpton, Mass, 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, MasB. 



/ii(^UlJ^ JLli'ii.. 



Start in Basiness for Yoarself. 



8UCCE88 AS8UBED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



aAPPAGH & RICH, 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. Tf{OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
DEHLEB IN STOVES 8ND RANGES. 

AGENT FOK THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. EILDEIR, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 
All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer , 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class and Athletic Groups^ &c. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 

•FASHIONABLE TAILOR.* 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTY 

}^' All suits made in my own work-shops. „JF| 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehusetts flgpiealtofal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEaE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percleroii Horses and Souioi Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods, 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Hooks, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

O^POSITB TOWN HALL. 



MANUFACTUKEK OF 

Pineapple, Iiemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



RiVEK Stkeet, 



NOKTHAMFTON, MASS. 



E. B. HICKINSDN, D. D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Houbs : 

9 TO 12 A.. IS/L., 1-30 TO S I». l-I. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 

A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBDE1I3 <3-OOIDS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



tl^Jtepairing done while you teaUt-^lr 
» PUtEKlX ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITY STJtEET, AMMERST, MASS, 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 



FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - • AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield riflea. 
Sunday and night calls responded to at rssidence, first door 
-west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

♦Co-Operative Steai Laandry* 

and Carpet Renovatinir Establlsliment, 



-^ficel^ .A.fi;exxt;« 



H. Xv. cieA-iVE; »oo 



Oct Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S-^srS A.TISF.A.CTIOKr GmrA.IlA.I«rTBBX>, t^S* 

Office : 
Next Doob West of Amitt St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



'^PartriHge's Utitic Outfjttings.^- 

Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banters. 

NEVt STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST PKICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co. 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGlfi: LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON. 



D. JJ. Kelton. 



F. F. KELTON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POBLTBY, VEeeBLES, FISH PHD OYSTERS. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Holyoke. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 

A.. J. »OHIIl,I-,A.ICEJ, 

108 Main Street, Nokthampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



kW\S^^^ 




&" Consider— If you can teep the wet out ij 

f( of your rifle it will not rasinotfree^e. Only vl 

t Marlin Repeaters t 

K have Solid Tops, shedding -water like a f 



duck's V)ack. Our 197-page book (just out) 
tells aU about them. Up-to-date infor- 
mation about powders,black and smoke- 
less; proper sizes, Quantities, how to 
load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom,. etc.: 
trajectories, velocities, penetrations. All 
calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 



The Marlla Firearms Co., New Haven, Ct. 



Wc^-^tS^^^B^^^^'f^^^^^^^i^-^^ 



Tie M. N. Spear Book Store. 



ESTABLISHED FIFTY YEAKS. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery, Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

i=i3:oto<3-ib-a-2=x3:e:k. 



Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prices always the lowest. Best of work guaranteed. 



Cabinets, ^2.00 and $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, $1.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



Special price made oa quantities. 
Studio, 17 Spring Street, - - AUrSEJtST, JITASS. 



Hmberst Ibouse. 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, Manaobr. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE jlND CARPET STORE, 



A COMPLETE LINE OP GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



J. A, 



S 



DEALER IN 



WflTGjlES, CLOCKS, JEWEIiHY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND FANCY GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND RROMRTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



we: make 



PICTURE FRAMES 

Of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Regilding done. 



The lioFthampton M StoFe. 

L. K. CHEW, Manager. 

CoR. Main and Center Sts., Northampton. 



MASS. /GRICULTUIiAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We •would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT the lowest PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST. MASS. 



GLYNN, 



V 



T AILOR. ^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



. | > :the:: < t ' 

ilftaeeacbueetts 

Hattcultural 

College 



• OFFERS • 

1. A SHORT WINTEH COXTISiSE of eleven weeks in Agriculture, 
Dairying, Horticulture, Botany, Chemistry and Zoology, beginning the first 
Wednesday in January and ending the third Wednesday in March. No entrance 
examinations required. Tuition free to residents of the state. Open to both 
sexes. Candidates must be at least sixteen years of age. 

2. A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Eighteen courses of study are provided Senior year, sixteen of 
which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Foresty, Chemistry, 
Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in 
the higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study, English 
and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President, H. H. Goodell, Amherst, Mass. 




^':r^ 




Commencement 



7r "Jfr 







3L. X. 



NO. 16. 



CLOTH I NO FURNISH I NOS. 



We sell Clothing — Good Clothing — the best we can buy. We sell it as low 
as good clothing can be sold. We sell lower than some dealers because we sell 
for cash only, and thus have no losses. We also sell Furnishing Goods and Hats. 
The newest of new styles, and everything is guaranteed to be right. AGGIE 
MEN — we ask a share of your patronage — all you can give us. We will try and 
treat you right. 



I^. 



/ 



.^K^JVE^Ori^OIVG. 



AMHasf, Aa$$. 



An entirely new stock of Pipes. 



The very latest styles just received. 

A new and fresh stock of Tobaccos— all the best brands. 

All the popular brands of American Cigarettes. 

Hofltaan House and Le Roi little Cigars. 
Twenty brands of Turkish Cigarettes— all new. 



Sole agent for Huylers Candies. 



DEUEL'S AMHERST HOUSE DRUG STORE. 



M^W 



Winter Russet Shoes, $2, $2.^0, $j, $j.^o. 
Patent Leathers, $2.j;o to $S-00. 



REIPAIRINO. 



New Soles and Heels, 75c. 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 

Wedding and Engagemeiit Rings 

In approved forms. 
PRICES RIGHT. 



GOLLESE 
JEWELER 



BENNETT 



COLLEOE 
JEWELER 



Skilled workmen in our repair department. 

4®-EYES FITTED FREE.^8r 
By a graduate of Dk. Fostek, OccuUst. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 




COLL-A.E,S 



__ HARRY CLARK, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



;^' 



VOL. X. 



AMHERST. MASS., JUNE 19, 1900 



NO. 16 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. Aggie Life will be sent 
to all subscribers- until : its- discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to notify 
the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, 1901, Editor-in-Chief. 

NATHAN DAVIS WHITMAN, 1901, Business Manager. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Assistant Business Manager. 
CHARLES LESLIE RICE, 1901, Athletics. JAMES HENRY CHICKERING, 1 90 1 . Library Notes. 

THOMAS CASEY, 1901, Alumni Notes. HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Exchanges. 

CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, College Notes. ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, 1902. 

CLIFPORD ALBION TINKER, 1903. NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903. 

Terms: $1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 



LIFE'S DIRECTORY. 

G. R. Bridgeforth, Pres. Athletic Association, 
C. L. Rice, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

J. H. ChickeringSec. Nineteen Hundred and Two Index, 

Reading-Room, C. T. Leslie, Secretary. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
Y. H. Canto, Manager. 
J. C. Hall, Manager. 



Entered at the Post Off ice as second-class mail matter. 



Cdi'torial 



s. 



The action -of the students in drawing up the Memo- 
rial for presentation at the Alumni banquet is very 
commendable. It seemed our duty to take the initiative 
in the matter for it really lies with us whether or no we 
wish to have an enclosed field. That we do has now 
been made certain. Our reasonable success in ath- 
letics during the last year, especially during the foot- 
ball; season, merits the attention of our alumni. To 
the end that we may continue the good work it is 
hoped that an enclosed athletic field will be for us a 
thing of the near future. 



Through the faithful and energetic work of the 
members of the Association of American Agricul- 
tural Colleges and Experimental Stations the nation 
has come to the rescue of her state institutions, and 
the dark- and ominous cloud that has hung over us so 
long and filled everybody with gloomy foreboding has 
now a silver lining. " Behind the clouds is the sun 
still shining ;" and we trust that the storm clouds 



that have so long obscured it are gone forever. The 
Homestead Bill which in one form so seriously threat- 
ened to cut off the income of our agricultural colleges 
recently passed the House and the Senate with the 
proviso that, if the income from the sale of public 
lands at any time shall be insufficent to pay the 
college annuities, the deficiency shall be paid from 
the treasury of the United States. The measure 
passed the House after a short debate and the Senate 
without discussion or a dissenting vote. Those who 
who have realized the serious nature of the movement, 
which had it been successful would have seriously 
crippled our college and its sister institutions, will 
appreciate the efforts that have resulted so success- 
fully. The Life, in behalf of the students, takes this 
opportunity of extending congratulations and praise for 
the faithful and successful efforts of President Goodell. 



Two other measures, which are now pending final 
action by the House, are of special interest. One is 
the Senate bill, establishing schools of mines, or depart- 
ments of mining engineering in connection with the 



l82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



colleges established for the benefit of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts under the provision of an act, 
approved July 2, 1862. The measure with only 
minor amendments passed the Senate without a dis- 
senting vote after unanimous recommendation by the 
Senate committee on Mines and Mining. It was 
then unanimously reported to the house committee on 
Mines and Mining, but, owing to the urgency of public 
business and the brevity of the time intervening before 
adjournment it failed to get recognition. It is expected 
that it will be called up for action and passed at the 
short session. The other measure is the bill revising 
the laws of printing and distribution of public docu- 
ments, and contains a section providing that each col- 
lege established under the act of 1862, containing 
ten thousand volumes or over, be a depository of pub- 
lic documents. This bill is still pending final action 
by the Senate but it is hoped that it will pass that 
body before adjournment and be acted upon by the 
House at the short session. If this bill becomes a law 
all congressional publications of the nature of public 
documents will be sent regularly to all the larger col- 
leges, including our own, established under the act of 
1862. These documents will be very valuable for ref- 
erence and will materially add to the value of our library. 
As the matter now stands a great many documents 
have to be sent for, and many cannot be obtained at all. 



Surprise is frequently expressed that the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College does not issue a cata- 
logue. The present imitation, incorporated with and 
buried up in foreign matter.does not meet the require- 
ments of a first class college advertisement. There 
is no reason why the Massachusetts Agricultural college 
should not be on a footing with other colleges, and for 
us to occupy that place the essential thing to be done 
is to let the people know about us. It has been sug- 
gested that one great reason why we do not have a 
large number of students is because we do not have 
many graduates who occupy positions of such a char- 
acter that they would be likely to exert an influence 
that should lead our high school graduates to come to 
Aggie ; they are not in close enough touch with them. 
This is seen to be very reasonable, but it cannot be 
offered as an excuse for not publishing a catalogue. 
The business principles on which enterprises are con- 
ducted nowadays, and which apply to our own case. 



demands an advertisement that shall give as much 
information concerning Aggie as can be gotten by the 
same means concerning any other similar institution. 
It is astonishing what ignorance one meets"^ with con- 
cerning the course of instruction offered at our col- 
lege. Most people have an exaggerated idea of the 
main purpose for which the college was founded, and 
none whatever of the excellent practical, all-round 
training furnished. The college is well designed to 
give a symmetrical intellectual development, the end 
and aim of all true education, but only under proper 
conditions. Three hundred men will furnish these 
conditions. " We cannot accommodate that number ;" 
but we must. The people of this state will not 
have their sons turned away because they cannot be 
accommodated. What better excuse to ask for money 
than that the college is growing. With a firm finan- 
cial foundation, with a beautiful location, with a fine 
course of Senior electives and the probability of Jun- 
ior electives, and with increased advantages in modern 
language instruction the College should make itself 
more fully known to the people of the commonwealth. 
May the Massachusetts Agricultural College soon 
have a catalogue worthy of the college of the Old Bay 
State. 



That there is nothing new under the sun is a trite 
and tim.e-worn phrase but we are constantly surprised 
by the manifold circumstances that constantly arise to 
substantiate its truth. The Life recently took occa- 
sion to resurrect the old and much debated question 
of •• Frat " banquets, with the purpose of bringing 
about a discussion of the present system, of holding 
them in midwinter. It awakened in some an enthu- 
siastic response, and an old time interest that is still 
intensely alive. It is with no small amount of satis- 
faction that we have met with such a lively interest in 
a question of so much importance, involving as it does 
that important phase of college life, the fostering of 
the love of our graduates for their Alma Mater, and 
the maintenance of the regard and interest which they 
had for the fraternal brotherhood which they enjoyed 
within her walls. The importance of the matter, and 
the criticism engendered by a rather one-sided devel- 
opment of the subject in a recent editorial has led to 
a fuller consideration of it at this time with the hope 
that its importance may be impressed upon all who 



AGGIE LIFE. 



183 



may read this article. As is to be expected in a 
matter that has so long been open to agitation, ancf 
that is now so unsettled, there is more than one side, 
each with its champions, and each ably defended. 
One element is strongly conservative, another more 
or less innovative, though retaining those essential 
elements of commendable conservatism, loyalty and 
fraternal good will. The conservative element are 
desirous of seeing fraternity banquets remain an 
annual feature of Commencement although some of 
them care not much that they come at Commence^ 
ment so long as it is possible to keep up the custom 
of holding annual society reunions, all claiming that it 
is unwise to tear down this bulwark of the Fraternity, 
and substitute for it any other plan. To a great extent 
this spirit should be fostered ; for, indeed, perhaps the 
strongest ties that in the past have operated to 
strengthen the memory of college in the hearts of our 
alumni have originated in the Fraternity, the affections 
finding there an opportunity for their fullest develop- 
ment, as will always be the case where men are 
thrown together constantly and in a more brotherly 
relationship than is possible on a large scale. Indeed 
the Fraternity is not accomplishing that which its 
name implies to be its object, if it does not exert a 
welding and binding power separate from any other 
influence ; and to the end that it may more and more 
fulfill and continue to fulfill such grand work it is wise 
to employ those means that shall best maintain fra- 
ternal loyalty and love. But however unwise it may 
appear to attempt to substitute for the annual club 
banquets one other plan it is obviously equally unwise 
to go to the extreme of losing sight of the common 
welfare ; and we shall find that the presumed icon- 
oclasts are not such at all but are rather builders-up 
of a more patriotic and generous spirit than has some- 
times existed in the past. It is presumed that no 
man is so selfish as to <vish anything, so far as the 
college of which he is a member, graduate or other- 
wise, is concerned than the good of the institution. It 
is presumed, also, that men who go out from the col- 
lege are loyal to it, and that an interest in any part of 
it will be subordinated to an interest in the whole. 
That the alumni have the welfare of the college at 
heart is all-important, and it is necessary that nothing 
shall operate to subordinate the general welfare and 
common good to selfish ends if we wish to secure and 



maintain that broader and deeper interest in the col- 
lege. We have, then, four possible points of view 
from which to consider the matter of fraternity ban- 
quets : that of holding them at Commencement as 
has been the custom hitherto and sacrificing altogether 
any general alumni gathering at that time ; that of 
holding them at Commencement and having also a 
general gathering at that time ; that of holding them 
in mid-winter, and having a general gathering at Com- 
mencement and that of having a general gathering at 
Commencement and sacrificing the fraternity reunions. 
Of these four plans there is no doubt but that most of 
the alumni will favor one that still holds to the sepa- 
rate society banquets. It will be hardly possible to 
merge all the banquets into one and still retain those 
features of a society reunion which make up the 
attractiveness of such a gathering. If. then, there is 
a general sentiment in favor of still keeping up the 
old custom. And if it also seems desirable to have a 
general reunion, some way must be contrived to carry 
out both ideas. That the point of holding to separate 
banquets is well taken has been sufficiently empha- 
sized and needs no further stress, but before leaving 
the consideration of his matter it seems advisable to 
give a little thought to the benefits to be derived 
from a general enthusiastic alumni gathering. 
In the past there has been, oftentimes, distinct and 
harmful antagonism among our fraternities. This 
ought not to be so, and many have recognized this 
truth and have lent their aid to furthering a more 
friendly and co-operative spirit. The beneficial 
results of such action was clearly shown during our 
last season of football to the success of which nothing 
contributed more than did the spirit of unity 
and loyalty which existed in the college body at that 
time. The same spirit that can promote one 
enterprise in the college can support any other, and it 
is very clear to be seen that such a wholesome and 
united spirit is what we most need. Anything, there- 
fore, which may tend to break down those barriers 
which factional spirit is constantly building up will be 
hailed by all who are interested in the common good 
with no small measure of satisfaction. What more 
powerful stimulus to a united and brotherly spirit 
throughout the student body than to see the alumni 
united as one man, throwing aside all factional dif- 
ferences, and standing as one man for the promotion 



1^4 



AGGIE LIFE. 



of the welfare of the college ? and what more suitable 
way to display that loftier sentiment, that seeks the 
good of the college than in a general and enthusiastic 
alumni gathering. For the sake of a more friendly 
feeling among us we ask the co-operation of our grad- 
uates in fostering this higher spirit. For the sake of 
M. A. C. athletics and all student enterprises, as well 
as for the ultimate good of the college we ask the 
alumni to consider whatever points we may have 
brought out, to the end that something may be done 
to make a hearty alumni gathering one of the coming 
distinctive features of Commencement week, some- 
thing to which every alumnus shall look forward to 
with greater interest and anticipation than he ever can 
to a fraternity banquet, however strong his attachment 
in that direction may be. 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 17TH. 



Baccalaureate Sermon by Dr. C. S. Walker, 10 : 45 a. m. 

Address before the College Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association by Rev. J. C. Wilson, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., 8p. M. 

*** *** 

MONDAY/JUNE i8th. 

The Flint Prize Oratorical Contest, Junior class, 

3 : 30 p. M. 

Speakers: Mr. Bridgeforth, Mr. Gamwell, 
Mr. Cook, Mr. Hunting,: 

Mr. DiCKERMAN, Mr. Wilson. 

The Burnham Prize Speaking, Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes, 8 p. m. 
Speakers: Sophomores. Freshmen. 

Mr. Blake, Mr. Franklin, 

Mr. Dacy, Mr. O'Hearn, 

Mr. Hall, Mr. Peebles, 

Mr. Knight. Mr. Webster. 

College Banquet for Trustees, Faculty, former students 
and Alumni, 10 p. m. 

*«* V 
TUESDAY, JUNE 19TH. 



Alumni Meeting in the Mathematical Room, 9 A. m. 

Annual Meeting of the Trustees, at the ofifice of the 
Hatch Experiment Station, 9 : 30 a. m. 

Meeting of the Committee on Experiment Depart- 
ment, at the office of the Hatch Experiment Station, 
II : 30 A. M. 



Class Day Exercises, i : 30 p. m 
Speakers: Mr. Canto, 

Mr. Landers, 
Mr. Morrill, 

Battalion Parade, Battalion Drill, 4 p. m. 



Mr. Monahan, 
Mr. Kellogg, 
Mr. Harmon. 



Suppers of the various classes, 6 p. m. 
Reception by President and Trustees, 8 to 10 p. m. 
Senior Promenade in Drill Hall, 10 p. m. 
*** V 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20TH. 



Graduation Exercises, Announcement of Prizes, 
AND Conferring of Degrees, 10 a. m. 



Commencement Speakers : 
Mr. Campbell, 
Mr. Frost, 
Mr. Harmon, 



Mr. Hull, 
Mr. Landers, 
Mr. Monahan. 



THURSDAY and FRIDAY, JUNE 21ST, 22ND. 



Examination of Candidates for Admission at the 
Botanic Museum, 9 A. m. Two days are required fOy 
examination. 



A COMMENCEMENT MEMORIAL. 

Amherst, Mass., June 18, 1900. 

To the General Body of Alumni, and Former Stu- 
pents of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, and 
to all others who may feel an interest in our institution : 
Greeting ! 

We the undersigned students of the Massadiusetts 
lAgricultural College, firmly believing in the principles 
jfor which our beloved institution stands, and eager to 
po what we singly and collectively can to further her 
Interests, among other things, take this means at the 
fclose of a prosperous year in the history of the college, 
to call the attention of our Alumni and Former Mem- 
jaers, and of all those who may take interest and pride 
n our welfare, to a subject which we honestly believe, 
merits the active and patriotic attention of every well- 
wisher of a first-class institution of collegiate instruc- 
::ion. 

Young as our college is, when compared with many 
plder and larger institutions of learning in our country, 
we nevertheless feel that she holds an honorable place 
:n furthering the physical and mental abilities of the 
i^oung men of our country. We believe that, resting 
ipon a financial status more stable than she has 
litherto had, she is henceforth destined to take a 
)roader and more influential position in the eyes of 
voung men, who in the early years of the twentieth 
century, are to be moulded into good citizens of the 
ptate and of the Nation. Believing this, then, we 
respectfully and unanimously claim that there is a 
feature of our existence, which provided our college 



AGGIE LIFE. 



185 



is to grow and prosper, must receive attention and 
support ; and this is the question of an enclosed Ath- 
letic Field. 

Notwithstanding the occasional bright . episodes in 
the history of athletic development since its founding, 
athletics have thus far been negative rather than posi- 
tive. The question has been w,hat we cannot, do, 
rather than what we cow dp* With a ^ great plenty of 
athletic material, untrained and untutored though it 
may, have been, and with the desire to take our right- 
ful place among other colleges, we have been pre- 
vented from lassuniing a.strong. athletic position, be- 
cause, of the lack of means and money. At present, 
our athletic teams, — rbaseball, football, and an, occa- 
sional track squad,— arp. necessarily, supported by a 
pe^r capita tax, directly , placed upon the st^udent body. 
The results of this system, all who have attended col- 
lege know only too well. Ai; the best barely enough 
money is obtained to meet the usual running expenses 
and what with tardy payments, and, in short, with the 
burden upon the general student Jjpdy of such a sys- 
tem, mpy games both out of town, and ,at home have 
had to be cancelled. , A properly jpnclp^ed and graded 
athle.tic field, with football, baseball and track facilities, 
one where an adrnissipn fee could be charged would 
not pnly rernove in ^ larg^, qie^sure a severe burden 
from the student bpdy, but \vould, offer ijs a,n induce- 
ment to improve consistently and^systematipalily in 
athletic sports. With,^uch..a fipld we could ..better 
meet opposing teams not orily out, of .tpwn, but with 
the gate money received at home, could feel sure 
th^t necessary guarantees for visiting organizations 
woulc^ be forthcoming. , 

That athletics, such as we desire here at our col- 
lege, rightfully,aid,.in.adve,r]Lising.the good name and 
fame of an institution, we think no. one at present 
dpybts,. Therefore, tha,t, wei- may. do.our share in 
spreading .^broad the ,virtues ,of our college, not pnly 
by speaking highly; pf th,e. courses of instructipp offered, 
but f3y making adjust and legitimate uge of pur athletic, 
ability,, we ask that, as sppn as .may be possible, we. 
may be.,givei] ^n ,enclosure, wherein in, the days to 
con^e, the various teams of t^e , Massachusetts Agri- 
cu.ltutal .College ,niajf win . gloriously,, or ,- if,, need; he, 
lose manfully,^,. Byt in either .qase,,, we fe,el, Jh^t.we 
sljall.be helping jn ,09 .s^all degree to spread abroad 
the name of our Alma Mater. 



We understand with much pleasure that there is 
already on foot among a few of our alumni a place 
whereby in the near future we may perhaps obtain, a 
field such as we have here described. In conclusion 
we express a sincere wish that such a plan may 
soon come to fulfilment. , -, ■, 

(Signed by the students at mass meeting June 
nth. 1900.) 



COMMENCEMENT BELLS. 

With every hearty, ringing shout, 
Peal out, ye merry bells, peal out. 
What need have we for gnawing care 
In God"s free sunny, summer air? 
Forget the past — 'tis dead ! — and strive 
For one short week to be alive. 

Yes, peal it out both far and near. 
That college mates are gathered here ; 
And though the world may wonder why 
The earth and sky in beauty vie 
By actions prove that truth a lie 
That we were born to die. 
With every hearty, ringing shout 
Peal out, ye merry bells, peal out. 
What need have we for gnawing care 
In God's free sunny, summer air ? 



j-tories- 



A BOARDING SCHOOL ROMANCE. 

It was a quiet Sunday afternoon, and when one Is 
in good company a summer afternoon goes rapidly. 
W« had been out for an afternoon outing, Bessie 
Warrinet and I, and I- had helped gather the daisies 
for the wreath that now encircled the head of the 
most beautiful and best of girls. 

'I considered myself a nice, big brother ■ and 'when 
she said " Dick," instead of '" Mr. Graham," I used 
to bless the day we met, which, by the \5^ay was not a 
pleasant one, but one of those cold blustering days, 
that make a. fellow think of home, and of the group- 
gathered about the .fireplace, watching the yellow 
flames creep ■ over the big oak • logs that -snap and 
crackle almost as lively as does the corn In the popper 
above them. ' ••' = 

.How well I remember our first meeting !• And with 
what ecstacies did I lose myself over that head -of. 
golden hair, and how I swelled with pride when she? 
told me I could be her big brother ! I believe I would 



i86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



have challenged anyone to mortal connbat had they 
attempted to assume the responsibility that I took 
upon my shoulders in caring for the comfort of that 
sister of mine, — and with what sweet confidence did 
she accept my self-delegated trust, though she laughed 
to think how conceited I became in such a short time. 
I thought I had good reason for my conceit, in being 
the big brother of the little maiden with the glorious 
hair, and the blue eyes that would not shrink before 
the gaze of anyone. 

Our school days were ebbing away faster than I 
wished for, but the tide of time stops for no man. I 
used to wonder if she, too, wished the days would not 
go by so rapidly ; but to wonder is characteristic of 
the school boy who dares not ask and end his doubt- 
ing. " Our school days are the happiest days of our 
lives," they say, and this I know to be true, but school 
days do not last forever. 

As we were wandering slowly homeward that quiet 
Sunday afternoon I wished it could be always so. I 
pictured to myself the happiness there might be in 
this vale of tears for one, but I dared not ask and learn 
if I could say for two. 

"To meet, to know, to love, to part," is an old quo- 
tation but it is always finding new applications. The 
year was nearly gone and the last few days were 
speeding away. There was a great deal to be done 
and my little sister was neglected. Without my 
meaning to let them go the opportunities went by and 
we saw little of each other. When all was over and 
the last good-byes were said it was too late to make 
up for lack of attention in the few weeks past. There 
were promises of letters but as I look back I remem- 
ber how few and far between they were and how, 
finally, they ceased altogether. 

That seems long ago, but memory links the past to 
the present by an inseparable bond. What recollec- 
tions a photograph will bring up. Once I sat and 
gazed at a face that was once dear to me. It was 
only a kodack picture. A little maiden seated on an 
old stile with a wreath of daisies covering a mass of 
curls. As I looked I said to myself, " Dick Graham, 
you were a fool," and there was no dissenting, wee, 
small voice to contradict. 

The day was pleasant, extremely so. Across the 
blue waters of the Atlantic the coast of New Jersey 
showed as a hazy blue line. I leaned over the rail 



and watched the foam rising in the wake of the vessel. 
I was off for a pleasure trip through the South. " For 
a young fellow of twenty-five there is nothing like 
travel," I said to myself as I lighted a cigar and turned 
to look for a seat. 

The afternoon was a short one, and as the October 
breezes were not exceptionally warm, I had the deck 
almost to myself. I greatly enjoyed the sea, for to 
me everything connected with ocean travel is delight- 
ful. I am seldom lonely when I have a good cigar, 
but I was nothing loath to join the other passengers 
when they rang the bell for supper. 

The captain introduced me to several and I found 
myself next to a Mr. Warriner. The name, so famil- 
iar to my ears, set me to thinking of my little school 
friend, " my little sister," as I had called her. 

"My daughter, Mr. Graham." Thus abruptly 
interrupted in my thoughts I rose, rather confusedly, 
to bow to the young lady who had approached. 

" Bess! " I stammered. " Dick!" was the reply, 
and I saw that her manner had not changed during 
the years of separation. 

That night we walked the deck together, and once, 
as we paused, I brushed away a stray curl that hung 
over her forehead, and asked her if she had forgotten. 

" Forgotten, oh Dick, I could not ! I loved you, 
but I thought I was to you only a little sister and for- 
gotten long ago." In answer to a whispered question 
a golden head sunk on my shoulder and all was still. 
I was answered and we were happy. 

To our friends at home it was a surprise but as 
some said, they knew we'd get together again as we 
were too good a couple for Fate to separate. I may 
add that the voyage proved fully as pleasant as I had 
hoped for. A, 



MANY ARE CALLED. 

The long spring term was drawing to a close. Com- 
mencement, the goal toward which many anxious 
weeks of preparation had been tending, was now at 
hand and the campus of old Peyton echoed once 
again to the tread of the joyous throngs gathered to 
witness the passing of another class out from the col- 
lege walls. The picturesque cap and gown of the 
Seniors was to be seen here and there, as the wearers 
moved about, to-day the centre of attraction, to- 
morrow to be forgotten. Dignified professors were 



AGGIE LIFE. 



187 



mingled with more or less illustrious alumni back for 
a short season to revive something of the old Peyton 
spirit which years of contact with a practical world 
was doing its utmost to obliterate. Hilarious under- 
classmen rushed to and fro, filled with a sense of their 
own Importance.with elation at their recent promotions, 
and rejoicing to think of the vacation close at hand. 
Sprinkled among these soberly attired bands, the 
brighter colors of the women gave an added life and 
beauty to the scene. The fragrance of many flowers 
filled the air, birds sang in the sturdy elms that lined 
the walks, and above all rose the clear June sky, a 
mass of cloudless blue. 

Yet there is little unalloyed happiness allotted to us; 
in our brightest visions the dark clouds of foreboding 
hover, and rare indeed is he who can entirely dispel 
their gloom. And perhaps it was too much to expect 
that even this characteristically joyous assemblage 
would be without its undertone of sadness. Com- 
mencement means the sundering of the ties of four 
happy years. It means separation from what has 
been near and cherished. It means the exchanging 
of the old irresponsible days for the perplexities and 
uncertainties of an unknown future. It is but natural 
that the heart of the Senior should be filled with 
regrets at such a time. 

On this day, however, a close observer might have 
read in the averted face of Raymond Williams a still 
more noticeable sadness. Many, had they seen it, 
would have wondered, for Williams had been a man 
with a notable career. A good athlete, his prowess 
had won many honors for himself and his Alma Mater. 
A ready debater, a pleasing speaker, a good society 
man, popularity had from the first been his without the 
seeking. And in the class-room he had ranked as 
elsewhere among the leaders, as his prominent part in 
the Commencement program attested. Yet he was 
discouraged and downcast in the midst of the scenes 
of his final triumphs. 

Why? There were many reasons. Williams 
raised his head and glanced at a group not far from 
the elm under which he was standing. 

" Van Dent and Edith Mason ! Of course," he 
said to himself, bitterly. " He has won so far in the 
race ; the greatest prize will also be his. Why is 
Fate always for him and against me ? Is it my fault 
that I am poor and he is rich ? I have toiled and 



toiled for years in order to get the bare means for an 
education ; he has been reared in luxury, and spends 
every month for trifles more than my savings for whole 
years. 1 have had to study hard to succeed reason- 
ably ; he with his quick perceptions skims over the 
pages, seizes intuitively the salient points, and wins. 
And now at the end of the course I find myself penni- 
less, and handicapped for years, while he starts out 
with everything to aid him. It is my destiny to lose 
and his to win. Even the Vinton prize.which I sought 
for desperately and which would have given me a fair 
start in life, is won by him to whom the five hundred 
dollars is but a trifle. — No, no, I am not jealous — I do 
not begrudge him his good-fortune — but surely to give 
one so much and another so little cannot be justice ! " 

Williams, however, was no pessimist. On the con- 
trary he was best known as a man who never knew 
when he was beaten. He was simply a continual 
loser, a man who had time and again approached near 
the coveted threshold only to be crowded off by a 
luckier rival. Repeatedly had he been called but sel- 
dom had he been chosen. With a feeling of repulsion 
for it all, he turned and walked rapidly away. 

A burst of applause proclaimed that another speaker 
had finished. The usual stream of congratulations 
poured in. 

" Do you know," said Edith Mason to Van Dent, "I 
always feel so sorry for the poor fellows who are shut 
out of all this. Quite often they have worked as hard 
as the winners and their friends expect as much of 
them. Don't you think so ? " 

" Oh, perhaps so," answered Van Dent," but you 
know the under dog always gets most of our sympathy 
whether he deserves it or not. Victory is after all 
what counts, and ' to the victors belong the spoils.' " 

Edith tapped lightly on the ground with her parasol. 

" I wonder where Mr. Williams has gone," she said; 
" He was standing over there only a moment ago. I 
wanted to tell him how I liked his oration but I shall 
have to wait. Don't you think he did well ? " 

" Very. He always works hard and his work shows 
it. He is too desperately in earnest though for his 
own good. If I only could catch some of the intense- 
ness with which he goes at a thing — but then, I would 
rather do without it than assume his burdens. I fancy 
he has a hard row to hoe — the old story of unrewarded 
genius. But how time flies! Only a few more 



i88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



hours and we shall all be scattered with our college 
days a mere memory. And that reminds me — When 
do you sail for Europe ? " 

" Next week. We did not plan to go so soon but 
papa was obliged to be here the first of August and 
the only alternative was an early trip." 

" And I leave to-morrow for the West. We may 
not meet again for months. Before I go I want to 
win one prize more — the highest and worthiest, the 
one I have sought for longest. Do you think the 
judge will give me the decision I want, Edith ? " 

" You are too precipitate. Perhaps — I cannot say 
— but I fear that the contest is not yet closed. But 
before I go — " 

" I will wait." 

And so they parted. 

•' Why, Mr. Williams, are you going away without 
bidding me good-bye ? You have been posing in the 
midst of y&ur lanrels with a frown on your face as 
black as though you were in the direst tribulation. 
This is no time to play the cynic or the hermit." 

Williams looked up. It was Edith Mason who had 
thus dropped down upon him. Had he seen her com- 
ing, rather than meet her in his present state of mind, 
he would have kept out of the way. But now escape 
was impossible. 

" I intended — that is I thought of seeing you to- 
morrow," he stammered. 

" But what is the matter ? I know something has 
happened. Is it bad news ? " 

" No, it is nothing. I was a fool, but I expected to 
win the Vinton prize and lost." 

" And does it make so much difference as all that ? 
It was only a little and you have honors enough now." 

" True — enough empty honors. But this meant 
more — a good start in life. It has ruined my plans 
and put me back many years." 

" Then the news I bring you will be all the more 
welcome. I have been trying to see you ever since 
papa told me. At a meeting of the trustees this 
afternoon you were chosen assistant professor in Ger- 
man. A year's leave was given you and you will be 
expected to spend most of the time in Europe." 

He looked at her, dazed at his sudden, almost mir- 
aculous good ftjrtune. " And I thought I stood no 
chance," he said. Then he caught still more of her 
meaning. 



"You leave for Europe, too, this week?" he 
asked with a new gleam of hope. 

" Yes." 

" And do you go alone ? " 

He held his breath for her answer. It came so low 
he could scarcely hear. 

" No, Raymond," said the voice, •' I do not think — 
I know I shall not go alone." 

" But Van Dent ? " he asked still doubting. 

She laughed scornfully. 

" Mr. Van Dent has drawn and — lost." 

The next morning a friend hailed Williams, " Do 
you know," said he, " that Stockton has had bad 
news? His father died yesterday, and he has got to 
give up all his plans and take care of the family. 
Hard luck, isn't it? " 

" Yes, mighty hard. Poor fellow 1 " said Williams, 
while he wondered at the half-hearted way in which he 
said it. And yet such is human sympathy. 



Collc^? No*«- 



— Commencement. 

— The U. S. census taker visited the college a few 
days ago. 

— The Seniors' have had exceptionally fine weather 
for their short vacation. 

— Dr. Fernald and family have gone to Southwest 
Harbor, Me., for the summer, 

— Captain Anderson and wife have moved to their 
summer home in Belchertown. 

— Miss Louise Babson is visiting at the home of 
her brother, Professor H. Babson. 

— A. C. Monahan and brother were lately called 
home by the death of their brother, 

— The battalion has been drilling in duck trousers 
of late, making a very attractive sight, 

— The choir has been under the training of Mrs. 
L. E. Sanderson for the past few weeks, 

— Dr. Goessmann and family have returned' from 
Europe where they have spent the Ikst year. 

— The College Senate for the next year will consist 
of the following men from the upper classes : Wilson'; 
Chickering, Gordon and Gamwell ; Belden, Hall, 
Dacy and West. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



iSg 



— The senior class banquet will be held at 10-30 
Wedrtesday night at the Norwood hotel, Northamp- 
ton. 

— The President, having been in Washington for 
some time on business, has returned for Commence- 
ment. 

— In spite of difficulties the Senior class flower-bed 
is looking exceedingly well, much praise being due 
the designer. 

— New globes have been put on the chandeliers in 
the chapel which add greatly to the appeararice of 
those fixtures. 

— Monday, June 4, the freshman class visited the 
state asylum at Northampton. Their report is : All 
returned — that went. 

— To fill the vacancy made by the death of J. D. 
W. French, Governor Crane has appointed George 
H. Ellis as trustee of the college. 

— The following members of the Q. T. V. fraternity 
were in Boston recently: F. Guy Stanley, J. Harris 
Todd, T. Casey, and R. Wesley Morse. 

— Kinney and Claflin, 1902, have arranged for a 
bicycle trip through the eastern part of the state. 
They intend starting in the middle of the week. 

— The Senior invitations present an unusually neat 
and attractive appearance this year. An excellent 
engraving of the chapel is a very important feature. 

— Dr. Wellington sailed a week ago Saturday for 
Berlin' where he will study during the summer. He 
sailed from New York, on the steamer Staatendam. 

— We have thoughtlessly neglected to state the fact 
that the Senior "Polycons" defeated the Senior 
Botanists in a championship game of baseball, the 
score being 7-2. 

— Prof. C. S. Walker attended the Commence- 
ment exercises at Andover Theological Seminary 
where he represented the East Hampshire Conference 
as a member of the board of examiners of the gradu- 
ating class. 

— The Inspector-general of the United States 
Army inspected the college on Friday, June 1. The 
battalion was reviewed after chapel, after which there 
followed a short company drill. The dormitories were 
inspected and all college exercises for the three lower 
classes were suspended. 



— The senior class' in engineering visited the Hol- 
yoke Water Power Company's works recently and 
were kindly shown about by Mr. Sickeland. The princi- 
pal points of interest were : the dam, the gate, and 
turbine tester. 

— The class of 1903 have elected the following met! 
for next term : E. B. Snell, president ; S. C. JBacon, 
vice-president ; G. D. Jones, secretary ; E. B. Shell, 
foot-ball captain ; G. L. Barrus, class captain ; W. V. 
Tower, track-team captain ; N. F. Monahan, histo- 
rian ; P. W. Brooks, sergeant at arms. 

— Three new cases have lately been added to the 
zoological museum. The larger one in the ceHtre of 
the room is for mammals and there are two srhallef 
ones at the west side for birds. The increased space 
allows for a needed re-arrangement of the collection 
which before was crowded in many places for lack of 
room. The effect is to greatly improve the appear- 
ance of the museum. 

— Wednesday afternoon the Sophomores met the. 
Freshmen on the diamond. The Sophs had three 
'varsity men, the Freshies one regular, and substitute 
Bowler, who twirled the ball. With Paul at secortd. 
and Bodfish and Cook as battery, the game looked 
easy for the Sophs but they soon found the Freshies 
hard nuts. Bowler and Bodfish both did good 
work in the box at first, but both went to pieces fn the 
last two innings, so intense was the excitement. The 
game was called with two balls in the field, with the 
Freshman at the bat and with the score 11 to 8 in 
favor of the Sophomores. 



/ithletfc No-t?$. 



Aggie, 9 ; Worcester Tech., 7. 
Aggie won from Tech. in an exciting but poorly 
played game on Pratt Field, May 30. The playiiig 
of both teams was listless, errors being frequent' aritf 
inexcusable. Aggie excelled a bit in stick work, 
Pierson being a particularly bright star, getting three 
clean hits. In the second inning Tech. scored two' 
runs,and in the third a hit, a base on balls, and sev- 
eral errors scored three more. Aggie scored one run 
in the third Halligan sacrificing for O'Hearn. The 
home team sent another man across the rubber in the 
fourth and three in the seventh, thus tying the score. 



I go 



AGGIE LIFE. 





2 





1 


2 


1 






2 


1 


4 











1 


15 
2 




1 


1 

2 















1 






3 


1 





n 










6 





3 







1 








1 




2 


1 





5 







9 


8 


24 


11 


9 


. p. I. 














R. 


iB. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 






1 


1 
1 


5 



2 



1 
1 







1 


2 


2 


3 




3 

1 


1 

1 


1 
8 


3 

1 


1 







1 



1 


9 
1 


















1 


2 


2 




















6 27 10 8 

3 4—9 
2 0—7 
Earned run — M. A. C. Total 



The visitors started off the eighth with two runs on a 
combination of errors but could get no more. Aggie 
came to bat and succeeded in scoring four runs and 
taking the game. The score : 



Paul, s., 
O'Hearn. 3b., 
Graves, lb.. 
Halligan, 2b., 
Cook, lb-, 
Pierson, r., 
Henry, c, 
Macomber, m., 
Bodfish, p.. 

Total, 



Thompson, 3b.. 
H.Walsh, lb., 
Hatch, s., 
F. Walsh, p.. 
Maynard, c. 
Trail, lb.. 
Gray, m.. 
Stone, 2b., 
Messier, r., 

. Total, 7 

M.A. C, 1 1 
W. P. I., 2 3 
Times at bat— M. A. C., 44, W. P. I., 38. 
bases— M. A. C., 9, W. P. 1., 7. Sacrifice hit— Paul Stolen bases— 
O'Hearn, 4, Pierson, 3, Paul. Graves, Stone, Thompson, Maynard. Two- 
base hits — F. Walsh, O'Hearn. First base on balls — Stone, F. Walsh, 
Henry 2, Cook. Craves. First base on errors— M. A. C. 4.. W. P. I., 3. 
Left on bases, M. A. C, 8, W. P. I., 5. Struck out— Maynard, 2, Trail, 
H. Walsh, Hatch, Stone, Messier, O'Hearn, Graves 2, Cook, Bodfish, 
Macomoer. Batters hit — Pierson, Graves, Halligan, Hatch. Double phy — 
Bodfsh to Halligan to Graves. Passed balls'— Henry 3, Maynard 2. Wild 
pitch— Bodfish. Time— 2 h., 45 m. Umpire— George Merritt. 

Aggie, 8 ; Storrs, 2. 
On Saturday, June 2nd, Aggie played a game with 
Storrs Agricultural college easily winning wtth a mar- 
gin of six runs. The game was an uninteresting one 
from a sporting standpoint, the 'field being so uneven 
that steady playing was impossible. There were 
no surprises it being a sure thing from the start. 
The game was featureless except for a double play 
from Bodfish to Halligan to Graves. The score : 



Paul, s., 
O'Hearn, 3b., 
Graves, lb., 
Halligan, 2b., 
Cook, If., 
Pierson, r.f-: 
Henry, c, 
Macomber, c.f., 
Bodfish, p.. 

Total. 



Lyman, c, 
Blakesely, 2b., 
Moriarity, 3b., 
Pratt, l.f.. 
Downing, s.. 
Bishop, lb., 
McLean, p,, 
Harvey, r.f., 
Kan,l.f., 

Total, 



A.B. 


R. 


B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


6 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


6 


I 


2 


2 


1 





5 


I 





7 


1 





5 





1 


7 


1 


-?. 


3 


1 











n 


5 














1 


5 














I 


5 


1 





1 








5 


1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


47 


8 


8 


27 


10 


6 


STORRS 












A.B. 


R. 


B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


4 


1 





9 


2 


2 


4 





1 


4 


1 


2 


4 








2 


4 


1 


4 








1 





6 


3 








2 


1 


2 


3 








7 


1 


3 


3 





■ 1 


1 


4 





2 








1 








2 


1 















29 



27 



13 



Aggie, 
Storrs, 



14 2 10 0—8 
00000200 0—2 
Two base hit — O'Hearn. Stolen bases— Aggie, 4, Storrs 1 . Bases on 
balls — off Bodfish, off McLean, 4. Passed bails- Lyman, 5, Struck out by 
Bodfish, 8, by McLean, 7. Double play — Bodfish to Halligan to Graves. 
Time— 1 h., 40 m. Umpire — A B. Peebles. 

Trinity, 1 ; Aggie, 0. 
On June 2nd Aggie met Trinity on Trinity Field, 
Hartford, and were defeated by the above score. The 
excellent work of both teams prevented either from 
running up a big score. In the fifth inning an acci- 
dent occurred which gave Trinity her run. The spec- 
ial features were the work of both batteries and 
O'Hearn's capture of a liner that saved two scores in 
the fifth inning. 



£:}{cKdin:^^S- 



The Z?/!s/q/y from the Girls' High School of Boston, 
ranks high among our High School exchanges: Its 
articles are thoroughly sensible and of considerable 
interest." A Boyhood in Cambridge Long Ago," tells 
of the early life of Thomas Wentworth Higginson. 
" Filling up Time " may be read with profit by all. It 
indicates an aptitude for quotations on the part of its 
writer. " My Best Young Man " is a clever little 
sketch well worked out to a fitting ending. Exchanges 
receive brief mention but what is said is always to the 
point. Something unusual about this paper is that 
the alumnae contribute regularly. 

***** 

The Latin School Register ixom the historic Boston 
Latin school is a neat little paper which can be de- 
pended upon to be good. The current issue contains 
two good bits of verse, something not met with every 
day, and an interesting article on athletics by a tal- 
ented Englishman comparing the sports of Boston, 
Mass, and Boston. England. " One from Hickory 
Jake " is a fish story of the first order, but well told 
for all that. The editorials, generally weak and in- 
significant in this class of papers are considerably 
above the average. 

Epsilon contains several good sketches, the " Trans- 
gressors " being perhaps the best, and a little verse. 
•' Evening" is one of the most remarkable produc- 
tions we have ever seen. We fancied at first that we 
could trace a resemblance to the famous " Evening 



AGGIE LIFE. 



igi 



byaTailor," but further study convinced us that it was 
absolutely unique. We hope the writer is not often 
affected that way, as it suggests a rather bad night- 
mare. 

***** 

"Judy O'Mara's Vow " in the Premier is a strong, 
well told story, in keeping with the general excellence 
of the paper. 

The Sagamore for May is a manual training num- 
ber. It contains many fine cuts and presents a very 
creditable appearance. 

***** 

The Masten Park Chronicle is a quarterly, accord- 
ingly we expect more from it than from a paper is- 
sued more frequently. Nor are we disappointed. The 
current issue contains much that is good and a little 
that is really excellent. " A Girl's Prerogative " is 
one of the best stories we have ever read in any ama- 
teur publication. It is original, fairly true to life, and 
worked out in a manner which while thoroughly logi- 
cal yet leads to an unexpected ending. We congrat- 
ulate the writer on his success. 



umrvi. 



'89. — B. L. Hartwell, who is chemist at the Rhode 
Island Experiment Station, will be at No. 44 Triangle 
St., Amherst, Commencement week. 

'89. — C. A. Whitney of Upton, Mass., has been 
appointed secretary of the Fruit Growers' Association 
of this state. Mr. Whitney has charge of planning 
the field meetings ; the fall meeting will be held at 
Amherst. 

'90. — Edgar Gregory, Hathorne, Mass. 

'91. — W. C. Paige of Henderson, Ky., is visiting 
his parents at Amherst. Mr. Paige is Y. M. C. A. 
secretary of his town. 

'91. — Arthur H. Sawyer is in the Engineering 
Corps of the Wachusett Dam and Aqueduct Depart- 
ment of the Metropolitan Water Board. His present 
work is swamp improvement. Address, Box 48, 
West Boylston, Mass. 

Class of 1 892 ; 

Dr. W. I. Boynton, office 351 Main St., residence 
192 St. James Ave., Springfield, Mass. 



J. E. Deuel, residence, Lincoln ave., Amherst, 
Mass. 

J. L. Field, 3017 Prairie ave., Chicago, 111. Sales- 
man with Jenkins, Kree & Co. 

Dr. R. P. Lyman, veterinarian, 997 Main St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

F. H. Plumb, 15 Merrick Ave., Springfield, Mass. 
J. B. Knight is census enumerator in Belchertown, 
Mass. 

Ex-'92.— Chas. D. H. Condit, Troy Hills, N.J. , 
farmer. 

Ex-'92.— Wm. J. Goldthwait, Jr., 119 Devonshire 
St., Boston. 

'93. — Herbert C. Davis, postal clerk, Cincinnati 
and Florida Limited, route from Atlanta, Ga., to 
Foxville, Fla, Address 99 Trinity Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

'94. — Linus H. Bacon has received an appoint- 
ment as census enumerator for Spencer and will be- 
gin his work, June 1 . Address Spencer, Mass. 

'94.— Chas. P. Lounsbury of Cape Town, South 
Africa, is visiting friends in town ; he will attend Com- 
mencement exercises at the college. 

'94. — F. G. Averell of Boston is visiting at his home 
in East Amherst. 

Ex- '94. — Erastus Starr has bought out a large 
trucking business in Spencer. 

'95. — A. B. Smith is with Wilson Bros., wholesale 
men's furnishings, corner of Jackson B'v'd and Fifth 
Ave., Chicago. Home address is 544 Winnemas 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

'95. — Joseph Marsh is with Marsh Bros., Danvers, 
Real Estate and Insurance Brokers. 

'95. — H. D. Hemenway, formerly of the Horticul- 
tural Department here has accepted a position as 
instructor in Horticulture at a school of practical Hor- 
ticulture at Hartford, Conn. Mr. Hemenway will be 
a visitor at the college Commencement. Address at 
present, Barre, Mass. 

'96. — Albin M. Kramer, draughtsman with the 
Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

'96. — S. W. Fletcher has passed his examinations 
for a Ph. D. at Cornell University, and has been 
appointed Instructor in Nature Studies for the Sum- 
mer School. 



iga 



ACrGiE LIFE. 



'97. — H. J. Armstrong is Assistant City Engineer, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. Address, City Engineer's Office, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

'98. — A. J. Adjemian is Chemist in the Kansas 
Agricultural Experiment Station where he is carrying 
out a series of experiments for the determination of the 
nitrogen in corn ; he has seven hundred samples to 
analyze. Mr. Adjemian has for the past year been 
engaged in railroad engineering in Oklahoma. 

'99. — M. H. Pingree has been appointed Assistant 
Chemist in the Penn. Experiment Station, State 
College, Penn. Mr. Pingree is to take the place of 
the regular assistant who is traveling in Europe. 

'99. — W. E. Hinds has been appointed to fill the 
newly created office of secretary to the College Y. 
M. C. A. Mr. Hinds is census enumerator in Town- 
send, Mass. 

'99. — H. E. Maynard of the Worcester Polytech- 
nical School will be at his home in Amherst Com- 
mencement week. 



THE mMW SHOE I 

All Up-to-date Shoes for College Men. Our 
representative 

HARRY L. MANNING. 

will" be at Cliapcl rooms every few weeks. 

Gf^flHfllVI SHOE CO., 



280 Washington St., 



Boston, Mass. 



Ex-'Ol.- — Ernest W. Curtis is with the KnoUwood 
Cemetery Company. Mr. Curtis is Transitman on 
location work. Home address. Canton, Mass. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

Yale is to establish a college bank. 

The endowment fund of the University of Chicago 
is placed at $11,000,000. 

Dartmouth has arranged a two years course in 
finance and commerce ; law, currency, banking and 
transportation, are among the subjects considered. 



Whether you take a spin for fun 
Or hump yourself on a century run, 
You won't get sore and tired and stiff 
Or say, nextdoy, 3'ou're "done up"-T-^IF 
You soothe your muscles and oil your 
joints with 




Older than the history of athletics in 

America, it has been a favorite from the first. 

In two size bottles, 25 cents and SO cents. 

I. S. JOHNSON &. CO., Boston, Mass. 



TO THE DEAF.— A rich lady, cured of her 
Deafness and Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's 
Artificial Ear Drums, gave $10,000 to his Institute, 
so that deaf people unable to procure the Ear Drums 
may have them free. Address No. 4375 The Nich- 
olson Institute, 780, Eighth Avenue, New York. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 
Copyrights Aar 

Anyone sending a sketch and descTlptlon may 
(itiicKly ascertain our opinion free Whether an 
. Inyention Is probably patentable. Commni^ca. 
tlons strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for'securinKj>atentB. ' 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
tpeefal notice, without c harg e. In the' "- 

Scientific JUnerican. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest dlr-'' 
cnlation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; f oi^ months, $L Sold by all newsdealer*. 

MUNN j;Co>>'«—^ New Yort 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, J>. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 




JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Eine Watch-work a Specialty. 



Second door south of Post Office. 



Suits to order from $13.00 up. Suits pressed 50 cts. 

Pants pressed 20 cts. 

Remem'ber these suits Ki&pressed not siDonged or burned. 

POWRRS THE TAILOR. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Altering promptly done. 

Ladies' Coats made and altered. 

Gentlemen's own goods made and trimmed in the latest style. 



Kellogg's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



We Help Students through College 

by giving them employment during spare hours, 
either taking orders for our line of books, or hand- 
ling our useful novelties. First come, first served. 
Write at once for full particulars. Men or women. 

WALKER PUBLI5HINa CO., 
134 VanBuren St.. Chicago. 



TEACHERS WANTED! 



UNION TEaCPSMIGEKGIES OF PEQIGil. 



Rev. L. D. BASS, D. D., Manager. 



Pittsburg, Toronto, New Orleans, New York.-Washington, San 
Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver. There are thou- 
sands of positions to be filled. We had over 8,000 vacancies 
during the past season. Teachers needed now to contract for 
next. Unqiialifled facilities (or placing teachers in every, part 
of the United States and Canada, l^rincipals, Superintendents, 
Assistants, Grade Teachers, Public, Private, Art, etc., wanted. 

Address all applications to 

WASHINGTON, 0. C, 01' PITTSBUHG, Pfl. 




C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWK, D. D. S. 



DENTISTS. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



1 Office Houks : 9 a. m. to 5 f. m. 

I 

I Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 



[ M. A. C. students desirous of first class work at reasonable 
prices will find the following list of interest. 

Main Springs, $1.00, warranted one year. Cleaning, $1 to $2.50. 
Balance Staff, $1.50. 

JEWELRY AND OPTICAL WORK. 

Plain Gold Kings soldered, 25c. to 35c. Chased Gold Rings 
oldered, 26c. to 35c. Stone Kings, 50c. Gold Kye Glass or 
ppecs soldered, 35c. Eye Glass Spring, .gold filled, 35c. Eye 
gljiss Springs, gold, 50c. Kiding Bows, nickel, 1f>c. Kiding 
JBows, gold filled, 60c. Jewelry Kouian colored, 25c. Eye Glass 
^nd Spec Lenses, 25c. to $1.00. 
[ All work sent by mall for repair returned the same day. 



Jeweler, Optician and Engraver, 



137 Main St., 



Northampton, Mass, 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET, 
i Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, MasB. " ' ' 



AGGiE LIKK. 



Start in Basiness fof Yourself. 



SUCCESS ASSURED. 



Send 50c. for our system, with full 
instructions and outfit. We have never 
heard of any of our people making a 
failure of it. Known all through Amer- 
ica. 



DARRAGH & RICH, 



5, 7, 9, 11 Broadway, 



New York City. 



J. H. T^OTT, 

Plumber, Steam and Gas Fitter. 
DEALER IN STOVES AND BHNgES. 

AGENT FOE THE CELEBRATED 

Gurney Steam and Hot Water Heaters. 

Telephone 56-4. 



C. R. EILDEIR, 

(Successor to W. W. Hunt) 



All kinds of 



HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 



HUNT'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST. 



Lovelly 

The Photographer, 

To the classes of '97, '98 and '99 M. A. C. MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF COLLEGE WORK. 



Class a7id Athletic Groups, &f. 

Hand Cameras and Supplies in stock, and always fresh. 
AMHEEST, MASS. 



J. P. CAMPION, 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR. 



* 



My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
Latest Novelties and are the very best goods made. 
Call and examine them and get my prices. 

MILITARY SUITS A SPECIALTl. 

S^ All suits made in my own work-shops. ,^| 
Savings Bank Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



(Dassaehusetts Jlgpiealtupal College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Perctieron Horses and Soutiidoi Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually hare a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

E. A. JONES, Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE CO-OFEfiATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, largest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



MAWUFACTDEEK OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Ueer and Ginger 
Alo. Fountains charged to order. 



RIVBK Strket, 



Northampton, Mass. 



E. B. mCKINBDN, E. E. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

VriliLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



Office HonRS: 

9 TO 12 J\.. IvI., 1-30 TO e F. TsAi. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOE EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



tlg-Mepairing done tvIHle you tvait.Sti 
» rB(ENlX ROW. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY AUD FEED STABLE, 

T. L. FAIG-E, Proprietor, 

HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS. TAL- 

LYHO AND BARGE, HACKS, DOUBLE 

AND SINGLE TEAMS. 

AMITT aXMEET, A Iff HURST, MASS. 



STUDENTS can bny at fair prices 



FINE READY-MADE SUITS. 

ALSO 

Ovxastom JVIaicl© Olotlairag. 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



SANDERSON b THOMPSON 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-Operati¥e Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovatine: Establishment 



A.e:e:ie> A.e:e>x».t, 



M. I^. OK:A.r«EJ »oo 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SSS?3 A.TISFA.CTI03Sr C3-XJA.IIA.1>TTEEI3, ft/S* 

Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



'S 



.it. 



Base Ball, Foot Ball, Running Outfits, Tennis Rackets, 

Balls, Nets, &c. Jerseys, Sweaters, College Hats 

and Caps, Flags, Pennants and Banners. 

NBW STORE. NEW GOODS. LOWEST f RICES. 



Horace Partridge & Co., 



84 and 86 Franklin Street, - 



■ BOSTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



R. F. KELTON, 



D. B. Kelton. 



R. f . KELTON & CO., 

DEAMCRS IN 

Fresh and Salt Meats, 



POULTRY, VEeBBLES, FISH m 0YSTEi|8. 



35, 37 and 39 Main St., 



Ilolyoke. 



PHOTOGRARHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class aud Group Work a Specialty. 
i^A-ompt attention given to students. 



IOS.MAIN STKEET, ..... NOETHAMPXON, MASS. 

Tclopbone connection. 



prevail VvVtnusffJbfi^chosen ^/ith k\:^- 



.WhcreM 






M 



^,i^1 



Consider— If tou can keep the wet ont 
of your rifle it will not rustnoxfreeze. Only 

Marlin Repeaters 



have Solid Tops, shedding water like a 
duck's back. Our 191-page book (just out) 
tells all about them. Up-to-date Inf or- 



matlon«bout powder8,blaek and smoke- 
u> less; proper Bizes, Quantities, how to 
Kf - load; hundreds of bullets, lead, alloyed, 
ft-, Jacketed, soft-nosed, mushroom,! etc.: 
S, trajectories, Telocities.penetrations. All 
2r ■ calibres 22 to 45 ; how to care for arms and 
W , 1,000 other things, including many trade 
« J » secrets never before given to the public. 
^"A Vree if you will send itamps for postage to 
M': The Marlia Firearms Co., New Haven. Ct. 



feg^fe»i^»^'5'^" 



-vacsy 



The M. N. Spear Book Store. 



ESTABLISHED FITTT TEAKS. 



Miscellaneous Books. 

Fine line of Stationery^ Fancy Goods, &c. 

A SPECIALTY-M. A. C. STATIONERY. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 



I Portrait and Group Work a Specialty. 

|Pi-ices always the,l9,west. Best of virprk guaranteed. 



Cabinets, ^2.00 and, $2.50 per doz. 
Cards, ,fl.50 and $1.75 per doz. 



\ Special price, njade oa qqaqtities. 

Studio, 17 Sjtritxg Street, - - jLMS£!It8T, MASS, 



Hmbetet Ibouse* 



FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 



D. H. KENDRICK, MANAGER. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITUREjlND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINE OF GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



El. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



WE MAKE- 



PICTURE FRAMES 

of every description. 
We carry an immense line of 

Call and see them. Eegilding done. 



The llorthampton M Store. 

t. R. CHEW, Manager. 

Con. Main and Center Sts., Northampton, 



J. A. RAW80N, 

SEALEB IN 

WATCHES, CliOGKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND PLATED 
WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, CANES, SPORT- 
ING AND EANCT GOODS. 

Fine Stationery, Fountain Pens. 

REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LAKGB STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



MASS. jlGRIGULTUIiAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHBKST, MASS. 

We would Inform the friends of the college, and the publle 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS 

SMALL FRUITS A